Just curious...

Discussion in 'Student Research and Publishing' started by pressmom, May 25, 2008.

  1. pressmom

    pressmom Third year!
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    Hi everyone,

    Since this forum is mainly for med students (I'm a vet student), I was wondering how your research is structured as a student. Are you working on your own or with a professor, PhD, MD or some combination of the above? Are you all MD/PhD or are some of you just pursuing your MD?

    I'm working on some clinical research this summer, studying scintigraphy in cats and dogs to discover ureteral obstructions. I didn't think I'd like research, but as it turns out, I'm loving it. (Only some vet students do research prior to professional school, and it doesn't seem to play as important of a role in getting into professional school as it does in human medicine. More emphasis is placed on clinical experience, as that's where most vets will end up.)

    Thanks!

    Also, if this has been discussed before, could someone point me to the thread?
     
  2. RxnMan

    RxnMan Who, me? A doctor?
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    It depends on your level of involvement and your training/experience.

    A lot of kids in my class essentially have the PI (of any stripe) tell them what experiement to run, or what data to collect. I've got a MS, so I designed my own experiements and I put in my own IRB, with minimal mentor oversight. There's PhDs in my class who can do everything on their own, including writing grants.

    Just? Just an MD? Hmp.

    I'm kidding. This website is for MDs and MD students (and DOs), but anyone can parcipate here.

    A majority of the research done out there by MDs will be clinical in nature (does X drug or Y do better in the setting of Z?), so what you're saying isn't that surprising. Also, schools want MD applicants to know what they're getting into, and clinical experience plays into this.

    I don't know if it has been discussed elswhere, but you can use the search function (right side of the blue bar at the top).
     
  3. pressmom

    pressmom Third year!
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    I knew I'd get slammed for that! :p j/k I'm JUST getting my DVM (but possibly an MBA, too).

    Good to know that stuff. There are definitely a few people in the vet boards who have masters and have done their own thing. There are others in DVM/PhD programs.

    Both the projects I applied for were clinical in nature (the other one I applied for was a long-acting Fentanyl formulation in dogs and a MAC-BAR study with an anesthesiologist), but there are others in the same program I'm in doing bench work and epidemiological stuff. (One is doing DNA extraction and another is tracking MRSA here in TN.)

    Thanks for the answers!
     
  4. tbo

    tbo MS-4
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    RxnMan, Out of curiosity how did you go about selecting your area of study and your PI? I'm about in the same boat as you - I could probably get an experiment running on my own.
     
  5. RxnMan

    RxnMan Who, me? A doctor?
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    I totally lucked out in that my school assigns us advisors, and mine had a similar background and research interest.

    But that doesn't help you.

    Take a look through the FAQ. My tips for finding a PI are there. For you, if you want greater autonomy, then be sure to be clear about it when talking to prospective PIs.
     
  6. tbo

    tbo MS-4
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    Thanks RxnMan.
     

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