Mylez

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Hi all,

Anyone go to a vet school that has an online anatomy website for LA anatomy? I've hunted around a bit but haven't found one. Our school is changing their method of exam this term of anatomy to computer based, so I'd like to look at some photos to prepare for the exam.

Thanks!
 

dyachei

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Hi all,

Anyone go to a vet school that has an online anatomy website for LA anatomy? I've hunted around a bit but haven't found one. Our school is changing their method of exam this term of anatomy to computer based, so I'd like to look at some photos to prepare for the exam.

Thanks!
While my school doesn't have much, I use this website from Cornell

http://web.vet.cornell.edu/public/oed/horsedissection/search.asp

Hope this helps.
 

Lathiana

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Nice site!! This should be very helpful... our lab guide is missing things etc in the drawings that we still have to be able to find and ID on the exam... :(
 
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Habibti

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Ours, too. It can be pretty frustrating.
We only get a list of terms to be able to ID. They have tons of books out that are supposed to help, but it can take quite a while to find a good picture.
 
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Mylez

Mylez

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Thanks everyone, this will be very helpful.

BTW--how many of you had computer based anatomy exams (eg. no gross specimens at all, just photos of them?). This is the first term we've not had gross anatomy specimens and it certainly was a bit of a hit trying to take the exam based on pictures.
 

Capella

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Thanks everyone, this will be very helpful.

BTW--how many of you had computer based anatomy exams (eg. no gross specimens at all, just photos of them?). This is the first term we've not had gross anatomy specimens and it certainly was a bit of a hit trying to take the exam based on pictures.
WHAT!?! That's crazy. Pictures look almost nothing like the real thing. I used the Cornell and Minnesota websites to study anatomy this past year because they were good dissections compared to my own, but if I only had pictures to look at, I know I would have failed all our real specimen tests.
 

RazorDoc2010

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WHAT!?! That's crazy. Pictures look almost nothing like the real thing. I used the Cornell and Minnesota websites to study anatomy this past year because they were good dissections compared to my own, but if I only had pictures to look at, I know I would have failed all our real specimen tests.
no kidding! I had enough trouble with the computer images of RBC maturation...I can't imagine doing anatomy practicals like that.
 
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Mylez

Mylez

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Yeah, our argument to this new professor is just that: pictures are not an accurate representation of our specimens. He claims that many vet schools are using this method, so I thought it'd be interesting to see what other schools do. He is a new faculty prof who has taught at other schools and is teaching our LA course--we have traditionally had another professor who is amazing; so of course we miss her.
 

runnerDC

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He claims that many vet schools are using this method, so I thought it'd be interesting to see what other schools do.
In our LA anatomy class at Tufts, we are broken up into groups of 8 people, and each group gets their own goat (or sheep) and horse to dissect (4 people work on the goat/sheep and 4 work on the horse). Then there is one small group of 2 or so people working on a cow, one working on a pig, and one working on a llama. So everybody in the class gets to see and touch first-hand the anatomy of all of these animals and their comparative differences.

I couldn't imagine doing it any other way and definitely could not imagine learning (or being tested) through pictures alone.
 
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Mylez

Mylez

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I didn't mean to confuse: we have specimens. It is about one horse per two students and the same for small ruminants (eg: goats, sheep). We also have one large ruminant to look at (but no llamas or pigs). Our beef is that we learn all of this stuff on our specimens, so why do we get tested on it via digital photos?

We learned SA and exotic/wildlife anatomy this way: fresh specimens to go over and be tested on for the last two terms. This term we got a new professor (who has used this method elsewhere). His argument is that doing it photographically will teach us better orientation for surgery. The argument we have is that we'll have the dog/cat/horse in front of us when we're doing surgery to orient and see tissue planes/muscle insertions/blood vessels and so on. :confused:

He's kind of...interesting...
 

RazorDoc2010

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We are broken up into groups of 12 and each group (we break up into 2 groups of roughly 6) has a horse and cow to dissect through the LA part of the course. In the final stretch that we're in right now, we do turtles, snakes, iguanas (GIANT ones from Miami!), chickens, and pigs.
 
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