Sep 2, 2015
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I'm 23, currently in my 2nd year of Pharmacy school, with a 3.9 GPA.. I have the opportunity to graduate without any debt as well.. however, I have realized that I can't see myself working in a pharmacy for the rest of my life. I know this is a pretty good situation to be in.. and I am grateful. But even clinical/hospital pharmacy doesn't seem very appealing to me. My initial plans for my pharmacy career was to open my own independent, but it seems that is extremely tough nowadays with new laws / chains.

Some of my priorities would include freedom of location and owning my business. Pharmacy seems like it doesn't fit these.

I'm a bit stuck at the moment.. I'd feel like I'm leaving a conventionally good career that promises 100k+ (especially while in your mid 20s) despite the oversaturation in recent years. However, I believe if you are good at presenting yourself, networking, and work hard in your Pharm Intern job, you will have a good chance at getting a job wherever you are, even big cities like LA, SF, NYC, Philly (although it might be a less desirable one like at a busy chain). However, the oversaturation/lack of desirable jobs/new pharm schools opening up is another factor I've considered as a negative.

Is this worth another 3 years of intensive (I'm sure I'll have to put in a lot more time than the previous years, and will cost ~$130k)? It'll be tough to work on side projects/business as well when factoring in extra study time + intern hours (If I want any chance at a job after graduating.. this is a must). Opportunity costs are real.

I figure if my priorities change in the future, I can always re-apply in a few years to pharm, or even med school, as long as I put in the work. PA and PT are also in the cards.. probably most fascinated with PT out of these choices despite the lower salary.

I guess this is one of those "should I pursue something I love for work vs. a safe route?" / 'road less traveled by' situations. Any advice/input?
 

Judgment Dragon

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Jul 2, 2011
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When you mean you have 0 debt, do you mean you have 0 undergraduate debt and 0 pharmacy school debt or 0 undergraduate debt and some pharmacy school debt?
 
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Maruko

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I'm 23, currently in my 2nd year of Pharmacy school, with a 3.9 GPA.. I have the opportunity to graduate without any debt as well.. however, I have realized that I can't see myself working in a pharmacy for the rest of my life. I know this is a pretty good situation to be in.. and I am grateful. But even clinical/hospital pharmacy doesn't seem very appealing to me. My initial plans for my pharmacy career was to open my own independent, but it seems that is extremely tough nowadays with new laws / chains.

Some of my priorities would include freedom of location and owning my business. Pharmacy seems like it doesn't fit these.

I'm a bit stuck at the moment.. I'd feel like I'm leaving a conventionally good career that promises 100k+ (especially while in your mid 20s) despite the oversaturation in recent years. However, I believe if you are good at presenting yourself, networking, and work hard in your Pharm Intern job, you will have a good chance at getting a job wherever you are, even big cities like LA, SF, NYC, Philly (although it might be a less desirable one like at a busy chain). However, the oversaturation/lack of desirable jobs/new pharm schools opening up is another factor I've considered as a negative.

Is this worth another 3 years of intensive (I'm sure I'll have to put in a lot more time than the previous years, and will cost ~$130k)? It'll be tough to work on side projects/business as well when factoring in extra study time + intern hours (If I want any chance at a job after graduating.. this is a must). Opportunity costs are real.

I figure if my priorities change in the future, I can always re-apply in a few years to pharm, or even med school, as long as I put in the work. PA and PT are also in the cards.. probably most fascinated with PT out of these choices despite the lower salary.

I guess this is one of those "should I pursue something I love for work vs. a safe route?" / 'road less traveled by' situations. Any advice/input?
pharmacy is not really a "safe route" nowadays. But:
seeing that you have 0 debt, pharmacy may be good for you, esp. since you're halfway through and you're still young (23), you should finish it.
if you decide you want something else later on, you can always apply for it after 1-2 years working as a pharmacist. you'll still be young at that time.

PS: i don't understand, though: if you'll graduate without debt then what does ~$130k cost come from?
 
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Digsbe

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Aug 6, 2011
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If you're going to have 0 debt just finish. You've come this far, just finish it out if it only costs you years. If you drop out and then apply to another grad program without finishing your current one that can be a big red flag on admissions. I also wouldn't drop out unless you have another opportunity already lined up.
 
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confettiflyer

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If you're halfway through at zero debt, I would recommend just grinding through and finishing and get licensed. This will be your backup plan to pay the bills should your dream job/career not pan out or take a while to develop.

I know us millennials are idealistic and all about finding your dream and other bull****, but at this point in the game you need to look at the cold calculus involved of opportunity costs and time spent already. You're also still young enough to finish and start a new career after anyway, something people still do at age 35-40 and beyond.
 
OP
J
Sep 2, 2015
8
1
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Pharmacy Student
pharmacy is not really a "safe route" nowadays. But:
seeing that you have 0 debt, pharmacy may be good for you, esp. since you're halfway through and you're still young (23), you should finish it.
if you decide you want something else later on, you can always apply for it after 1-2 years working as a pharmacist. you'll still be young at that time.

PS: i don't understand, though: if you'll graduate without debt then what does ~$130k cost come from?
I guess "safe" is relative.. because compared to many other professions, it is still a better outlook in terms of employment, even if schools are pumping out more grads each year.

Graduate without debt but will still be paying the 130k out of pocket. No interest is what I'm saying.. in a position to not have to take a loan but I can't avoid paying tuition haha.

If you're halfway through at zero debt, I would recommend just grinding through and finishing and get licensed. This will be your backup plan to pay the bills should your dream job/career not pan out or take a while to develop.

I know us millennials are idealistic and all about finding your dream and other bull****, but at this point in the game you need to look at the cold calculus involved of opportunity costs and time spent already. You're also still young enough to finish and start a new career after anyway, something people still do at age 35-40 and beyond.
It is idealistic, but with new technologies and media, there are so many ways to make decent money through jobs that were not existent 10 years ago. Looking at cold calculations, it seems it might be ideal to finish the 3 years, but there are a lot of opportunities that could be missed from the amount of time + money spent.

You raise a great point, but what that's flipped around in that I can always start a new career now, and then I can go back to pharm school (or something similar) if things don't pan out, even at 35-40 (more realistically 26-28).

Really appreciate all the input, everybody. Happy I didn't get trolled yet haha
 

Maruko

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You raise a great point, but what that's flipped around in that I can always start a new career now, and then I can go back to pharm school (or something similar) if things don't pan out, even at 35-40 (more realistically 26-28).
how do you imagine you can "go back to pharm school" after starting a new path? it'll take 3-4 years and you can't go back to pharm after that long...
 
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confettiflyer

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It is idealistic, but with new technologies and media, there are so many ways to make decent money through jobs that were not existent 10 years ago. Looking at cold calculations, it seems it might be ideal to finish the 3 years, but there are a lot of opportunities that could be missed from the amount of time + money spent.

You raise a great point, but what that's flipped around in that I can always start a new career now, and then I can go back to pharm school (or something similar) if things don't pan out, even at 35-40 (more realistically 26-28).

Really appreciate all the input, everybody. Happy I didn't get trolled yet haha
I agree with maruko above that it isn't realistic to think you can return to pharmacy school at a later time. The longest deferrals I've seen are on order of 1-2 years, usually for medical reasons. Anything longer than 3-4 years I would say the profession/knowledge base required has changed such that many schools would make you start over from scratch. Even if you reapply, many schools require prerequisites to be < 10 years old, so you'd have to repeat basic science core from undergrad.

But you do raise a good point about opportunities now and forgoing them -- only you can judge whether these are really worth scrapping what you've put in already in pharmacy. I'm inclined to say no, but you know yourself best.
 
OP
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Sep 2, 2015
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Sorry that I didn't clarify, I didn't mean going back to pharmacy school and resuming. I meant re-applying and restarting from P1.

However, I feel that I would rather do PT or PA at that point.. possibly med school.
 

Maruko

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Sorry that I didn't clarify, I didn't mean going back to pharmacy school and resuming. I meant re-applying and restarting from P1.
this is even more insane than coming back to pharmacy school! a complete waste of time.
not to mention that if you withdraw from a school, there's no way they'll (or any other pharm schools) accept you back later.

you are young now, and have 0 debt, you should definitely finish, then think of other paths later.
 
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wucool33

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If you truly dislike pharmacy, then cut your losses and quit now. Most pharmacists are risk averse, so of course asking on a pharmacy forum, most people will tell you to finish. I'm pretty sure people told Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs to finish college too. What's the point of finishing something you hate? Pharmacy is a sunk cost to you at this point... Even if your dream is to be a bus driver, start on your dreams now...
 

BMBiology

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Everybody hates pharmacy one time or another and has thought about quitting. It is pretty common. Most people I know don't get much satisfaction from working as a pharmacist.

If you had worked in a pharmacy and you are absolutely sure this is not for you then take your loss and move on.

I would say about 10% are truly happy with their decision to go into this profession. I am one of them but I got lucky...really lucky. I could have easily ended up in retail or be stuck in a hospital basement and be miserable.
 
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Digsbe

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Sorry that I didn't clarify, I didn't mean going back to pharmacy school and resuming. I meant re-applying and restarting from P1.

However, I feel that I would rather do PT or PA at that point.. possibly med school.
Just a word of caution (especially for med schools), if they see that you dropped out of a program because you feel you made the wrong choice and wanted to change that will likely be a HUGE red flag to them in that they'll fear you'll also drop out of their programs too (thus taking a seat away from a committed person). Not saying that will be true for all schools, but for many if they see a dropout of a professional program it may be a red flag for admittance to another. Getting a PharmD and then saying you want to swap professions may be an asset to you if you can prove a genuine desire to swap.
 

Maruko

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I would say about 10% are truly happy with their decision to go into this profession. I am one of them but I got lucky...really lucky. I could have easily ended up in retail or be stuck in a hospital basement and be miserable.
why are so few pharmacists happy with their career?

may i ask what you do if not hospital and retail?
 

W19

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Everybody hates pharmacy one time or another and has thought about quitting. It is pretty common. Most people I know don't get much satisfaction from working as a pharmacist.

If you had worked in a pharmacy and you are absolutely sure this is not for you then take your loss and move on.

I would say about 10% are truly happy with their decision to go into this profession. I am one of them but I got lucky...really lucky. I could have easily ended up in retail or be stuck in a hospital basement and be miserable.
I think it's a healthcare 'phenomenon'. Most in this industry hate their job.
 

rph3664

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To the OP: I think you should graduate. What do you have left, 2 years? If it was a 4-year liberal arts program, I'd recommend that you change majors, but with this? Get your degree, and if you really hate pharmacy (do you have any work experience in the field?), you can look into doing something else.

I never "hated pharmacy" when I was in school, although I definitely questioned my sanity quite a few times, wondering, "Is this worth it?" For me, it was, for the next 18 years. :)
 
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farmadiazepine

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Finish up and get the degree, then do whatever you want. You are losing absolutely nothing, and at 23 you are not really even losing years. The most important thing is to get that degree, especially since you have it so good. Then with zero debt you can pursue whatever you want to pursue and still be able to work and have an income. Don't leave.
 

BMBiology

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why are so few pharmacists happy with their career?

may i ask what you do if not hospital and retail?
People are going into this profession without any pharmacy experience. All they know is what they have read from CNN and from what pharmacy schools tell them. They don't know that their professors get to do what they do because the students are paying for their salary. So they end up with this unrealistic picture of the profession. It is when they finally work as a pharmacist 5 days a week, 52 weeks, then they realize pharmacy is not for them. But by then it is already too late.
 
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rph3664

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People are going into this profession without any pharmacy experience. All they know is what they have read from CNN and from what pharmacy schools tell them. They don't know that their professors get to do what they do because the students are paying for their salary. So they end up with this unrealistic picture of the profession. It is when they finally work as a pharmacist 5 days a week, 52 weeks, then they realize pharmacy is not for them. But by then it is already too late.
That was true when I was in school, too.
 

Digsbe

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I think part of the reason is information overload. You have to learn so much, so much therapeutics and how to treat patients yet only a small handful of pharmacists actually get to do that. Retail can be monotonous, and it seems retail companies typically don't want you spending much time with patients. Schools push things like collaborative practice, MTM, disease management, provider status, and an image that pharmacists will run pharmacotherapy clinics where you prescribe and manage chronic conditions or areas of specialty. That's not really happening, insurance doesn't pay for it, many physicians don't see a need for it (or don't think we're able to do it) and state laws don't allow it in some cases. The money isn't there because the insurance funding isn't there. It's frustrating to learn so much, know so much, know how to treat people but not be allowed or able to really apply that. You are far over-trained given the current normal practice setting.

Hospital pharmacy can be a drag when you're in the basement doing verification all day and checking IV preparations or things to go on crash carts or med restocks. You get calls from some nurses who either hate you or are angry with you, you have some arrogant physicians that won't listen when you bring up interactions or recommend better therapy, and administration still exists wanting you to meet metrics and spend tons of time documenting. That being said, it's obvious that not all nurses are angry/whiny nor are all physicians arrogant and apathetic about patient care. Clinical pharmacy can be interesting, but sometimes it's limited to just Vanc, anticoag drugs, aminoglycosides and other drug dosing and that's really all you do apart from rounds, which in some cases isn't even with physicians (you round with nurses, PT, non-physician caregivers, etc.) and in those cases you really don't discuss cases in detail or make treatment plans. Some places may be more progressive. If anything pharmacy practice lags when compared to the skills and knowledge a PharmD has, especially one that went through a residency. Some of it can be that in many cases you get no respect. You did 4 years of grad school, usually 8 years total (most people I know can't get it done in 6 years, and over 50% have a BS with others doing 3 years undergrad. The 6 year PharmD thing is a minority). Many in the public, and in healthcare, think you just count pills and don't understand that you worked extremely hard to earn a doctorate and are a specialist in using medications to treat people. It's kindof an ego thing for some, but as far as being recognized as "doctor x" or the public not seeing you as intelligent with people not knowing what a PharmD is can have some feeling like they invested a lot for no recognition (don't go to pharmacy school for prestige, or any profession for that matter). Some places like the VA or in some more progressive states this isn't the case as much, but overall pharmacists are pretty underutilized and jobs can be monotonous, although high paying. I think that's why many grow dissatisfied, and in that case just suck it up. You make 100k+ a year, let your hobbies and comfortable income be the satisfaction. I worked retail for a year prior to school, I didn't really hate it and I knew it made good money. I honestly enjoyed patient counselling and giving immunizations on rotations and so far as my job existing to provide me a living I'd be content with the money and hours with working longer days and having more days off. The lifestyle matched what I wanted, the job seemed fine to me, I had patient interaction and could help the public and the pay is good. Working 12-14 hour shifts and having 4-5 days off ever other week is appealing to me because I want to travel, and even if I only get 2 weeks vacation starting I can take 2-3 days on my short week and go on several trips per year.
 
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OP
J
Sep 2, 2015
8
1
Status
Pharmacy Student
Another thing I wanted to add.. since I entered the Pharmacy program with just 2 years undergrad, I don't have my bachelors yet, but I verified that I can use the credits from my first year of Pharm towards a Bio degree that I can complete in two semesters (25 credits). I would need that to apply for any other programs like PA, PT, MD, DO in the future.

And when I say I'm in my 2nd year, I mean starting my second year, therefore a full 3 years left.
 

radio frequency

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Dec 18, 2012
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I think you need to figure out what you want to do, then do it. Sunk costs are irrelevant. If you don't want to do pharmacy, don't do it. Your GPA and classes taken shouldn't even enter into your decision as they are basically irrelevant.
 
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BidingMyTime

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Ok, so you are in a 0 - 6 year program, that is a COMPLETELY different situation then someone entering 4 year pharmacy school after 2 - 4 years of undergrad.

My advice initially would have been, finish pharmacy school, there are a million reasons why you should finish it, and no legitimate reasons why you shouldn't.

However, if you are just 2 years in, most of your credits are general undergrad credits, and you could easily change majors without little loss. So, weigh your pros and cons carefully, and if you are convinced this is the best decision for you, then this is the time to change, before you start your 3rd year. If you do drop out, do so knowing that you will not get another chance to go back (yes, you might be the 1 in a million guy who does get another chance, but most likely you won't be.)
 

O.State

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Jul 18, 2014
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I think part of the reason is information overload. You have to learn so much, so much therapeutics and how to treat patients yet only a small handful of pharmacists actually get to do that. Retail can be monotonous, and it seems retail companies typically don't want you spending much time with patients. Schools push things like collaborative practice, MTM, disease management, provider status, and an image that pharmacists will run pharmacotherapy clinics where you prescribe and manage chronic conditions or areas of specialty. That's not really happening, insurance doesn't pay for it, many physicians don't see a need for it (or don't think we're able to do it) and state laws don't allow it in some cases. The money isn't there because the insurance funding isn't there. It's frustrating to learn so much, know so much, know how to treat people but not be allowed or able to really apply that. You are far over-trained given the current normal practice setting.

Hospital pharmacy can be a drag when you're in the basement doing verification all day and checking IV preparations or things to go on crash carts or med restocks. You get calls from some nurses who either hate you or are angry with you, you have some arrogant physicians that won't listen when you bring up interactions or recommend better therapy, and administration still exists wanting you to meet metrics and spend tons of time documenting. That being said, it's obvious that not all nurses are angry/whiny nor are all physicians arrogant and apathetic about patient care. Clinical pharmacy can be interesting, but sometimes it's limited to just Vanc, anticoag drugs, aminoglycosides and other drug dosing and that's really all you do apart from rounds, which in some cases isn't even with physicians (you round with nurses, PT, non-physician caregivers, etc.) and in those cases you really don't discuss cases in detail or make treatment plans. Some places may be more progressive. If anything pharmacy practice lags when compared to the skills and knowledge a PharmD has, especially one that went through a residency. Some of it can be that in many cases you get no respect. You did 4 years of grad school, usually 8 years total (most people I know can't get it done in 6 years, and over 50% have a BS with others doing 3 years undergrad. The 6 year PharmD thing is a minority). Many in the public, and in healthcare, think you just count pills and don't understand that you worked extremely hard to earn a doctorate and are a specialist in using medications to treat people. It's kindof an ego thing for some, but as far as being recognized as "doctor x" or the public not seeing you as intelligent with people not knowing what a PharmD is can have some feeling like they invested a lot for no recognition (don't go to pharmacy school for prestige, or any profession for that matter). Some places like the VA or in some more progressive states this isn't the case as much, but overall pharmacists are pretty underutilized and jobs can be monotonous, although high paying. I think that's why many grow dissatisfied, and in that case just suck it up. You make 100k+ a year, let your hobbies and comfortable income be the satisfaction. I worked retail for a year prior to school, I didn't really hate it and I knew it made good money. I honestly enjoyed patient counselling and giving immunizations on rotations and so far as my job existing to provide me a living I'd be content with the money and hours with working longer days and having more days off. The lifestyle matched what I wanted, the job seemed fine to me, I had patient interaction and could help the public and the pay is good. Working 12-14 hour shifts and having 4-5 days off ever other week is appealing to me because I want to travel, and even if I only get 2 weeks vacation starting I can take 2-3 days on my short week and go on several trips per year.
Very good post. I felt like a weirdo for the longest time bc I enjoyed retail and everything about it, meanwhile all my classmates are bemoaning the thought of it.

To the op: finish, get ur degree...in the duration, look at fields that might combine your knowledge and expertise in other settings (research? oncology/hematology?) But finish and get that title, it can only make you look better on your med school app to have Dr. already in front of your name.
 
Sep 3, 2015
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I believe Pharmacists are payed off well in other countries. Why don't you try taking up internships to see how that career plays out in other countries. an internship overseas might help you out on that. I have been checking on websites like diversityabroad.com and I think they can be helpful. Because with a good credits you have shifting your career would be such a waste.
 

Jbrl

2+ Year Member
May 7, 2015
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Another thing I wanted to add.. since I entered the Pharmacy program with just 2 years undergrad, I don't have my bachelors yet, but I verified that I can use the credits from my first year of Pharm towards a Bio degree that I can complete in two semesters (25 credits). I would need that to apply for any other programs like PA, PT, MD, DO in the future.

And when I say I'm in my 2nd year, I mean starting my second year, therefore a full 3 years left.
3 years is a long time. Don't fall prey to sunken ship bias. At the same time, you need to hone in on what you actually want to do i.e. not laundry listing all the possibilities, illustrating that you're not really sure what you would be looking for.

Why don't you just take a gap year? Travel, take other classes or get a bachelor's, work as a scribe/EMT/whatever. Find yourself and explore the other professions you're interested in. Come out of this year fully determined to either continue pharmacy school or switch out to something better. I say this because I was in a similar position as you, and would have regretted switching because I ended up finding my niche during P2 year. You have 0 debt; time is on your side.
 
Last edited:
OP
J
Sep 2, 2015
8
1
Status
Pharmacy Student
Ok, so you are in a 0 - 6 year program, that is a COMPLETELY different situation then someone entering 4 year pharmacy school after 2 - 4 years of undergrad.

My advice initially would have been, finish pharmacy school, there are a million reasons why you should finish it, and no legitimate reasons why you shouldn't.

However, if you are just 2 years in, most of your credits are general undergrad credits, and you could easily change majors without little loss. So, weigh your pros and cons carefully, and if you are convinced this is the best decision for you, then this is the time to change, before you start your 3rd year. If you do drop out, do so knowing that you will not get another chance to go back (yes, you might be the 1 in a million guy who does get another chance, but most likely you won't be.)
Actually, I'm in a 4 year pharm school, that I entered after 2 yrs of undergrad. I finished my 3rd year (first professional year), but my professional credits can be used to fulfill regular Bio credits.

Thanks for the responses, everybody. Great to hear outside opinions.
 

streetpreacher

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Sep 16, 2010
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My initial plans for my pharmacy career was to open my own independent, but it seems that is extremely tough nowadays with new laws / chains.
If you base this statement on what you find on this forum, I would suggest speaking to some people who own their own pharmacies (not just retail, but compounding/specialty pharmacies). There are many ways to make independent pharmacies operate very successfully and not directly compete with any retail chains, although you can definitely do that as well (just not to the degree of success seen in the past). Just a thought, worth checking out if you haven't made your mind up already.
 
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Mar 10, 2012
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If you base this statement on what you find on this forum, I would suggest speaking to some people who own their own pharmacies (not just retail, but compounding/specialty pharmacies). There are many ways to make independent pharmacies operate very successfully and not directly compete with any retail chains, although you can definitely do that as well (just not to the degree of success seen in the past). Just a thought, worth checking out if you haven't made your mind up already.

I actually agree with this. I have been on this forum since 2004 and everything I know about the profession has come from this forum. Last month, I was added to this new group on facebook (MWPA) and I was blown away. I couldn't believe what I was reading on there. I was surprised what a lot of people have achieved with their Pham D. This forum is very negative and does not reflect the true state of pharmacy.
 
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rph3664

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Jul 5, 2010
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Ok, so you are in a 0 - 6 year program, that is a COMPLETELY different situation then someone entering 4 year pharmacy school after 2 - 4 years of undergrad.

My advice initially would have been, finish pharmacy school, there are a million reasons why you should finish it, and no legitimate reasons why you shouldn't.

However, if you are just 2 years in, most of your credits are general undergrad credits, and you could easily change majors without little loss. So, weigh your pros and cons carefully, and if you are convinced this is the best decision for you, then this is the time to change, before you start your 3rd year. If you do drop out, do so knowing that you will not get another chance to go back (yes, you might be the 1 in a million guy who does get another chance, but most likely you won't be.)
I agree. If school has started, s/he should finish the semester, and find another major. It's not like s/he's on the verge of graduation.
 

Dalteparin

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Aug 17, 2009
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this is even more insane than coming back to pharmacy school! a complete waste of time.
not to mention that if you withdraw from a school, there's no way they'll (or any other pharm schools) accept you back later.

you are young now, and have 0 debt, you should definitely finish, then think of other paths later.
I agree! The only way a pharm school would let you come back is if you left with a grave reason. And by "grave reason," I mean that somebody was either in a grave or about to be.

Stick with pharmacy, build up a nest egg, and you can have your mid-life crisis early. :)
 
OP
J
Sep 2, 2015
8
1
Status
Pharmacy Student
Will this impact future chances with a PA/MD/PT program heavily? If I leave the program, I will be utilizing the credits from my P1 year towards a bachelors in Biology which I will finish this year thanks to those credits. Can't it viewed as a quicker path to a bachelors that I would need in order to switch careers into something I'm more passionate about?
 

panasoniku

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2012
88
30
Status
Pharmacist
Will this impact future chances with a PA/MD/PT program heavily? If I leave the program, I will be utilizing the credits from my P1 year towards a bachelors in Biology which I will finish this year thanks to those credits. Can't it viewed as a quicker path to a bachelors that I would need in order to switch careers into something I'm more passionate about?
I know pharm graduates that went back to med school and got SLAMMED during the interviews for "stealing a pharmacy school seat. Are you going to steal a seat from the med school class too?"

Anyways, with only one year of didactic schooling, I would just finish it. You should also look into other opportunities in pharmacy. Not everything is hospital and retail. There's industry, healthcare i-banking, informatics, automation, consulting services, etc. If I left pharm school before doing internships and rotations, I would have never known about these other opportunities that are a lot more exciting to me.
 
Sep 27, 2014
386
195
Baltimore
Status
Medical Student (Accepted)
Will this impact future chances with a PA/MD/PT program heavily? If I leave the program, I will be utilizing the credits from my P1 year towards a bachelors in Biology which I will finish this year thanks to those credits. Can't it viewed as a quicker path to a bachelors that I would need in order to switch careers into something I'm more passionate about?
It is all about twisting your decision into a positive. This should not impact your chances with applying to another health care professional program provided you have a solid MCAT/GRE and GPA.
 

stoichiometrist

7+ Year Member
Aug 2, 2011
2,197
2,196
I know pharm graduates that went back to med school and got SLAMMED during the interviews for "stealing a pharmacy school seat. Are you going to steal a seat from the med school class too?"
I just had to laugh at the idea that students are "stealing" pharmacy school seats when they're being handed out like candy right now.
 

JanuviaGrl

7+ Year Member
Aug 13, 2010
76
20
Status
Pharmacist
I actually agree with this. I have been on this forum since 2004 and everything I know about the profession has come from this forum. Last month, I was added to this new group on facebook (MWPA) and I was blown away. I couldn't believe what I was reading on there. I was surprised what a lot of people have achieved with their Pham D. This forum is very negative and does not reflect the true state of pharmacy.
Does MWPA stand for Minority Women Pharmacy Association? Or maybe not... Pls share the link or PM it to me. I want to read something positive too .
 

panasoniku

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2012
88
30
Status
Pharmacist
I just had to laugh at the idea that students are "stealing" pharmacy school seats when they're being handed out like candy right now.
I know, not my words! My friends and I laughed like wtf? Then again, there ARE people rejected. They also had solid MCAT scores in the mid to upper 30s, and near flawless pharm school GPA.
 

panasoniku

5+ Year Member
Jun 13, 2012
88
30
Status
Pharmacist
Wow you are paying pharmacy school out of pocket?

You (most likely your parents) are loaded then and you don't have to worry about paying bills I am guessing.

Then, you should take the risk and follow your dream honestly.
Ikr. I had a classmate that literally drove around in maseratis and exotic luxury cars and lives a magazine photoshoot life. Still graduated and hasn't worked a day in a pharmacy!
 

Jbrl

2+ Year Member
May 7, 2015
334
283
I know pharm graduates that went back to med school and got SLAMMED during the interviews for "stealing a pharmacy school seat. Are you going to steal a seat from the med school class too?"

Anyways, with only one year of didactic schooling, I would just finish it. You should also look into other opportunities in pharmacy. Not everything is hospital and retail. There's industry, healthcare i-banking, informatics, automation, consulting services, etc. If I left pharm school before doing internships and rotations, I would have never known about these other opportunities that are a lot more exciting to me.
IB would probably be really hard to break into for the vast majority of students, no? The ones who do probably went to top UGs or will need to do a lot of cold calling / networking...