Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center Transitional Year?

Feb 4, 2014
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Anyone gone through this program who can tell us their experience? As interview day did not consist of much interaction with residents it was hard to get a true feel for it. Specific things I am curious about:

Overall happiness/lifestyle?
Culture between staff, residents, attendings?
Housing? My understanding is that many people live on Manhattan, is salary enough to make due? Do they offer subsidized housing?

Anyone recent information would be helpful, thanks!
 
Dec 19, 2014
1
0
Lincoln Medical Center Transitional Year Review 2014-2015

Overall:
The program was my first choice, and I would choose the same program again as my top choice. There is no malignancy. No residents quit, get fired, or are on academic probation as per PD. Residents who need to interview for advanced spots are given the time off. Hours are quite good and I have down time to relax, study, get coffee, and eat outside in the courtyard on 90% of work days. Ty year residents are treated in high regards by attendings and nurses.

The South Bronx is an underserved area. For its zip code it is one of the poorest, with the most dialects spoken, one of the highest rates of comorbidities (mainly DM and obesity), and many high risk pregnancies. Patients are quite thankful for the service that is provided. The ER is the third busiest single center ER in the country. It's a level 1 trauma center and you'll see many GSW, MVA, and other high acuity trauma. You'll also see peds trauma occasionally.

Teaching:
On the core rotations surgery has 4 hours of conference on Thursdays, medicine has noon conference and teaching rounds daily, MICU has 2-4 hours of teaching rounds per day. We have a SimMan were we run codes and practice exam skills, multiple central line and air way mannequins, suturing equipment and laparoscopic equipment. However, on rotations without residents such as radiology or anesthesiology there is no formal conferences, but if you express interest all attending will go out of their way to teach you what they know. The ty year residents meet 1-2 times per month for one hour for teaching rounds and discussion of improvements to the residency or rotations.

Evaluations:
After every rotation you must collect surveys from one attending, nurse and peer. Do not worry about this.

House Staff:
There are department sponsored events. Christmas party dinner this year was at Calle Ocho with a three course meal. Also, had a picnic in prospect park with Dinosaur BBQ. CIR (resident union) also plans picnics and events. Spouses/boyfriends/girlfriends always welcome. Residents also have their own individual parties as well as. Attendings often buy coffee and meals (almost everyday on MICU with certain attendings).

Safety:
Police stationed at every entrance in hospital. No issues that I'm aware of. Never been messed with. However, some patients get verbally abusive in the ED; comes with the job of an ED physician.

Benefits:
Salary: $55,585 (2014-2015) +$500 for orientation and $2500/yr extra from residency Union CIR
$650 for books/laptop/iPad/step 3
$1200 for travel for abstract presentations (plotter printers for posters available in house).
FICA insurance is placed into a personal Prudential retirement account at $5000/yr
No cost dental, vision, and health insurance. Free prescription coverage is limited to $500/yr, but you can opt to pay a low monthly cost for total prescription coverage.
Premium pretax transit card for unlimited subway and bus anywhere in NYC is $100/month out of your salary if wanted.
UES UWS 1br prewar walk ups cost $1700-2000/mo. Bronx 1br by hospital ~$1200/mo.
I have enough money for 1br on UES, cable, Internet, ibr on my student loans, subway unlimited card, wash and fold service and maid service to clean my place biweekly. I also eat most every meal out. 20min commute by subway.

Rotations::
Hard:
SICU One Month (M-Saturday 6a-6p but often stay until 8p)
MICU One Month (m-f 730a-730p) two golden weekends and two weekend days on call (730a-730p)

Medium:
EM Two Months (19 12hour shifts per month) (8a-8p or 8p-8a - split in blocks each for two weeks per month)
IM Two Months(7:00-5p when not on call) (q4 call 7:00a-8p)
Surgery (6a-6p M-F)- one weekend day call (6a-6p) and one weekend night call (6p-6a)
OB clinic two weeks (easy) and L&D two weeks (630a-3pmish m-f)

Easy:
Vacation 1 month
3 elective months (most choose: anesthesiology, radiology, and a research month- no call, overnights, or weekends on electives; can take a few personal days off)
Anesthesiology (M-F 7:30a-early afternoon)
Radiology: (M-F 9am-early afternoon)
Research: take Step 3 and work on an independent research or quality improvement project
Medicine Clinic (1:30p-7:30p M-F)
Two weeks at the end of the year are given off regardless of the rotation to give time to move to your next program.

The bad:
Hospital was built mid century, and parts are old and outdated as you'd imagine a public hospital would be (ie SICU has no windows). Medicine clinics and ER are brand new and medicine and inpatient floors look good.

Nurses in New York State are unionized and you may find yourself performing blood draws, blood cultures, and a-sticks more often than your peers outside of New York State. Nurses in Clinic, SICU, and MICU are amazing, but you'll do occasional blood draws in ED, surgery, and medicine for the 5 months you're there.

Translator phones will be required for 50% of patient encounters if you don't speak Spanish. This adds double the time for all encounters but is expected and you're given ample time. Patients truly appreciate being able to speak their native language and often thank you profusely for taking the time to use a translator phone. Rarely, I get a patient who speaks an uncommon dialect and the translator service has to page me back in 5-15min when they find someone.

Switching services every month is a little clunky. You are often oriented on the first day of your new rotation. However, it has been my experience that the residents and attendings recognize you as a brand new resident to the service and orient you as they would on July 1st; so you're often not far behind the pgy-1 resident on that specialty. The ty residents call each other the weekend before switching services to get sign out on patients, find out where and when to show up, attending preferences, tips and tricks of the rotation, etc. We tried starting an online forum but nobody ended up using it.

Quadramed EMR (Epic implementation supposedly 2017) has its quirks and often loses notes; must save notes as partial often and copy your progress with ctrl+c.

The interview:
Starts around 8:30a->Quick presentation by PD->group interview->individual essay->tour-> interview with PD-> home in early afternoon 1-2p. Interview may give a malignant vibe with group interviews, one quick PD interview, and individual essays, but this is only a quirk of the interview process and should not be taken as a reflection of the program. It may be hard to express interest in the program during the interview day, but send a post-interview thank you note to the PD and keep in touch to express interest in the programs that you'll be ranking highly.

Final Words:
I think this program is a diamond in the rough and is often times overlooked or unheard of. However, if you're looking for a relaxed residency in NYC I'd definitely recommend it.
 
Last edited:
About the Ads
Oct 1, 2016
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A few changes I noticed:
- There is no longer 2-weeks off at the end. If you are on certain electives, they will grant you the time off to get ready for the move or orientations. If you are on rotations such as ICU or surgery, or IM, they will not give you the time off.
- There is no sick time (maybe a maximum of 3 days). If you get sick, it would be very difficult for others.
 
Last edited:
Apr 10, 2015
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Can anyone comment on the essay they wanted you to write? What about the group interview? Thanks in advance!!
 

starwarsfan123

2+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2017
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Lincoln Medical Center Transitional Year Review 2014-2015

Overall:
The program was my first choice, and I would choose the same program again as my top choice. There is no malignancy. No residents quit, get fired, or are on academic probation as per PD. Residents who need to interview for advanced spots are given the time off. Hours are quite good and I have down time to relax, study, get coffee, and eat outside in the courtyard on 90% of work days. Ty year residents are treated in high regards by attendings and nurses.

The South Bronx is an underserved area. For its zip code it is one of the poorest, with the most dialects spoken, one of the highest rates of comorbidities (mainly DM and obesity), and many high risk pregnancies. Patients are quite thankful for the service that is provided. The ER is the third busiest single center ER in the country. It's a level 1 trauma center and you'll see many GSW, MVA, and other high acuity trauma. You'll also see peds trauma occasionally.

Teaching:
On the core rotations surgery has 4 hours of conference on Thursdays, medicine has noon conference and teaching rounds daily, MICU has 2-4 hours of teaching rounds per day. We have a SimMan were we run codes and practice exam skills, multiple central line and air way mannequins, suturing equipment and laparoscopic equipment. However, on rotations without residents such as radiology or anesthesiology there is no formal conferences, but if you express interest all attending will go out of their way to teach you what they know. The ty year residents meet 1-2 times per month for one hour for teaching rounds and discussion of improvements to the residency or rotations.

Evaluations:
After every rotation you must collect surveys from one attending, nurse and peer. Do not worry about this.

House Staff:
There are department sponsored events. Christmas party dinner this year was at Calle Ocho with a three course meal. Also, had a picnic in prospect park with Dinosaur BBQ. CIR (resident union) also plans picnics and events. Spouses/boyfriends/girlfriends always welcome. Residents also have their own individual parties as well as. Attendings often buy coffee and meals (almost everyday on MICU with certain attendings).

Safety:
Police stationed at every entrance in hospital. No issues that I'm aware of. Never been messed with. However, some patients get verbally abusive in the ED; comes with the job of an ED physician.

Benefits:
Salary: $55,585 (2014-2015) +$500 for orientation and $2500/yr extra from residency Union CIR
$650 for books/laptop/iPad/step 3
$1200 for travel for abstract presentations (plotter printers for posters available in house).
FICA insurance is placed into a personal Prudential retirement account at $5000/yr
No cost dental, vision, and health insurance. Free prescription coverage is limited to $500/yr, but you can opt to pay a low monthly cost for total prescription coverage.
Premium pretax transit card for unlimited subway and bus anywhere in NYC is $100/month out of your salary if wanted.
UES UWS 1br prewar walk ups cost $1700-2000/mo. Bronx 1br by hospital ~$1200/mo.
I have enough money for 1br on UES, cable, Internet, ibr on my student loans, subway unlimited card, wash and fold service and maid service to clean my place biweekly. I also eat most every meal out. 20min commute by subway.

Rotations::
Hard:
SICU One Month (M-Saturday 6a-6p but often stay until 8p)
MICU One Month (m-f 730a-730p) two golden weekends and two weekend days on call (730a-730p)

Medium:
EM Two Months (19 12hour shifts per month) (8a-8p or 8p-8a - split in blocks each for two weeks per month)
IM Two Months(7:00-5p when not on call) (q4 call 7:00a-8p)
Surgery (6a-6p M-F)- one weekend day call (6a-6p) and one weekend night call (6p-6a)
OB clinic two weeks (easy) and L&D two weeks (630a-3pmish m-f)

Easy:
Vacation 1 month
3 elective months (most choose: anesthesiology, radiology, and a research month- no call, overnights, or weekends on electives; can take a few personal days off)
Anesthesiology (M-F 7:30a-early afternoon)
Radiology: (M-F 9am-early afternoon)
Research: take Step 3 and work on an independent research or quality improvement project
Medicine Clinic (1:30p-7:30p M-F)
Two weeks at the end of the year are given off regardless of the rotation to give time to move to your next program.

The bad:
Hospital was built mid century, and parts are old and outdated as you'd imagine a public hospital would be (ie SICU has no windows). Medicine clinics and ER are brand new and medicine and inpatient floors look good.

Nurses in New York State are unionized and you may find yourself performing blood draws, blood cultures, and a-sticks more often than your peers outside of New York State. Nurses in Clinic, SICU, and MICU are amazing, but you'll do occasional blood draws in ED, surgery, and medicine for the 5 months you're there.

Translator phones will be required for 50% of patient encounters if you don't speak Spanish. This adds double the time for all encounters but is expected and you're given ample time. Patients truly appreciate being able to speak their native language and often thank you profusely for taking the time to use a translator phone. Rarely, I get a patient who speaks an uncommon dialect and the translator service has to page me back in 5-15min when they find someone.

Switching services every month is a little clunky. You are often oriented on the first day of your new rotation. However, it has been my experience that the residents and attendings recognize you as a brand new resident to the service and orient you as they would on July 1st; so you're often not far behind the pgy-1 resident on that specialty. The ty residents call each other the weekend before switching services to get sign out on patients, find out where and when to show up, attending preferences, tips and tricks of the rotation, etc. We tried starting an online forum but nobody ended up using it.

Quadramed EMR (Epic implementation supposedly 2017) has its quirks and often loses notes; must save notes as partial often and copy your progress with ctrl+c.

The interview:
Starts around 8:30a->Quick presentation by PD->group interview->individual essay->tour-> interview with PD-> home in early afternoon 1-2p. Interview may give a malignant vibe with group interviews, one quick PD interview, and individual essays, but this is only a quirk of the interview process and should not be taken as a reflection of the program. It may be hard to express interest in the program during the interview day, but send a post-interview thank you note to the PD and keep in touch to express interest in the programs that you'll be ranking highly.

Final Words:
I think this program is a diamond in the rough and is often times overlooked or unheard of. However, if you're looking for a relaxed residency in NYC I'd definitely recommend it.
Reviving this comment. I received an interview there. What do you mean by essay?
 

parcus

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Aug 3, 2016
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Reviving this comment. I received an interview there. What do you mean by essay?
That is for prelim only. 4.000 characters essay on a topic about a couple of things you can choose. Dam, 4000 characters is longer than my PS; that is all I needed on top of all the madness going on in my life, really. 4 hours to do it from scratch... sight.
 

medrocks47

10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Mar 24, 2008
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Lincoln Medical Center Transitional Year Review 2014-2015

Overall:
The program was my first choice, and I would choose the same program again as my top choice. There is no malignancy. No residents quit, get fired, or are on academic probation as per PD. Residents who need to interview for advanced spots are given the time off. Hours are quite good and I have down time to relax, study, get coffee, and eat outside in the courtyard on 90% of work days. Ty year residents are treated in high regards by attendings and nurses.

The South Bronx is an underserved area. For its zip code it is one of the poorest, with the most dialects spoken, one of the highest rates of comorbidities (mainly DM and obesity), and many high risk pregnancies. Patients are quite thankful for the service that is provided. The ER is the third busiest single center ER in the country. It's a level 1 trauma center and you'll see many GSW, MVA, and other high acuity trauma. You'll also see peds trauma occasionally.

Teaching:
On the core rotations surgery has 4 hours of conference on Thursdays, medicine has noon conference and teaching rounds daily, MICU has 2-4 hours of teaching rounds per day. We have a SimMan were we run codes and practice exam skills, multiple central line and air way mannequins, suturing equipment and laparoscopic equipment. However, on rotations without residents such as radiology or anesthesiology there is no formal conferences, but if you express interest all attending will go out of their way to teach you what they know. The ty year residents meet 1-2 times per month for one hour for teaching rounds and discussion of improvements to the residency or rotations.

Evaluations:
After every rotation you must collect surveys from one attending, nurse and peer. Do not worry about this.

House Staff:
There are department sponsored events. Christmas party dinner this year was at Calle Ocho with a three course meal. Also, had a picnic in prospect park with Dinosaur BBQ. CIR (resident union) also plans picnics and events. Spouses/boyfriends/girlfriends always welcome. Residents also have their own individual parties as well as. Attendings often buy coffee and meals (almost everyday on MICU with certain attendings).

Safety:
Police stationed at every entrance in hospital. No issues that I'm aware of. Never been messed with. However, some patients get verbally abusive in the ED; comes with the job of an ED physician.

Benefits:
Salary: $55,585 (2014-2015) +$500 for orientation and $2500/yr extra from residency Union CIR
$650 for books/laptop/iPad/step 3
$1200 for travel for abstract presentations (plotter printers for posters available in house).
FICA insurance is placed into a personal Prudential retirement account at $5000/yr
No cost dental, vision, and health insurance. Free prescription coverage is limited to $500/yr, but you can opt to pay a low monthly cost for total prescription coverage.
Premium pretax transit card for unlimited subway and bus anywhere in NYC is $100/month out of your salary if wanted.
UES UWS 1br prewar walk ups cost $1700-2000/mo. Bronx 1br by hospital ~$1200/mo.
I have enough money for 1br on UES, cable, Internet, ibr on my student loans, subway unlimited card, wash and fold service and maid service to clean my place biweekly. I also eat most every meal out. 20min commute by subway.

Rotations::
Hard:
SICU One Month (M-Saturday 6a-6p but often stay until 8p)
MICU One Month (m-f 730a-730p) two golden weekends and two weekend days on call (730a-730p)

Medium:
EM Two Months (19 12hour shifts per month) (8a-8p or 8p-8a - split in blocks each for two weeks per month)
IM Two Months(7:00-5p when not on call) (q4 call 7:00a-8p)
Surgery (6a-6p M-F)- one weekend day call (6a-6p) and one weekend night call (6p-6a)
OB clinic two weeks (easy) and L&D two weeks (630a-3pmish m-f)

Easy:
Vacation 1 month
3 elective months (most choose: anesthesiology, radiology, and a research month- no call, overnights, or weekends on electives; can take a few personal days off)
Anesthesiology (M-F 7:30a-early afternoon)
Radiology: (M-F 9am-early afternoon)
Research: take Step 3 and work on an independent research or quality improvement project
Medicine Clinic (1:30p-7:30p M-F)
Two weeks at the end of the year are given off regardless of the rotation to give time to move to your next program.

The bad:
Hospital was built mid century, and parts are old and outdated as you'd imagine a public hospital would be (ie SICU has no windows). Medicine clinics and ER are brand new and medicine and inpatient floors look good.

Nurses in New York State are unionized and you may find yourself performing blood draws, blood cultures, and a-sticks more often than your peers outside of New York State. Nurses in Clinic, SICU, and MICU are amazing, but you'll do occasional blood draws in ED, surgery, and medicine for the 5 months you're there.

Translator phones will be required for 50% of patient encounters if you don't speak Spanish. This adds double the time for all encounters but is expected and you're given ample time. Patients truly appreciate being able to speak their native language and often thank you profusely for taking the time to use a translator phone. Rarely, I get a patient who speaks an uncommon dialect and the translator service has to page me back in 5-15min when they find someone.

Switching services every month is a little clunky. You are often oriented on the first day of your new rotation. However, it has been my experience that the residents and attendings recognize you as a brand new resident to the service and orient you as they would on July 1st; so you're often not far behind the pgy-1 resident on that specialty. The ty residents call each other the weekend before switching services to get sign out on patients, find out where and when to show up, attending preferences, tips and tricks of the rotation, etc. We tried starting an online forum but nobody ended up using it.

Quadramed EMR (Epic implementation supposedly 2017) has its quirks and often loses notes; must save notes as partial often and copy your progress with ctrl+c.

The interview:
Starts around 8:30a->Quick presentation by PD->group interview->individual essay->tour-> interview with PD-> home in early afternoon 1-2p. Interview may give a malignant vibe with group interviews, one quick PD interview, and individual essays, but this is only a quirk of the interview process and should not be taken as a reflection of the program. It may be hard to express interest in the program during the interview day, but send a post-interview thank you note to the PD and keep in touch to express interest in the programs that you'll be ranking highly.

Final Words:
I think this program is a diamond in the rough and is often times overlooked or unheard of. However, if you're looking for a relaxed residency in NYC I'd definitely recommend it.

Any information about the group interview would be greatly appreciated!!
 
Jan 11, 2018
1
0
Lincoln TY - 2017 Update

Hi everyone - The original posting from 2014-2015 was very helpful to me when I ranked programs so I thought I would take the time to write an update regarding the program, although I have never posted before.

Overall: Well-balanced internship in terms of alternating difficult months with relaxed months. Strongest rotations in terms of all-around learning experiences are MICU, SICU, General Surgery (Emergency General Surgery), and Emergency Medicine. Lincoln Hospital is a level-1 trauma center with a high volume emergency room. This program is ideal for the applicant going into an advanced program with a procedural or critical care flavor. Most of the interns chose this program over a prelim medicine year because they preferred to spend more time on surgical and emergency services, less on inpatient medical floors. The program also allows for 3 elective blocks.

Changes since original post include the appointment of a new residency director this past summer. The interview also no longer includes an essay or group interview - there are 2 faculty interviews, informal discussion with current residents, tour of the hospital, and finished by noon. Otherwise, rotations are about the same with 2 blocks of inpatient medical floors (2 weeks are night float), 1 block of medicine clinic, 1 block of MICU, 1 block of SICU, 1 block of surgical floors, 2 blocks of EM (19 night shifts, 19 day shifts), 1 block of OB/GYN, 3 blocks of electives (radiology, anesthesiology, research are typical if approved), and 1 block vacation. Blocks are 4 weeks long and they are very strict about taking vacation in a 4-week block, which can make it difficult if you need time at the end. There is also only 3 days of sick leave available. Although CIR (union) provides money to attend a conference, this needs to be approved by the director and scheduled during elective block.

Negatives to the program include its location in the South Bronx- be prepared to serve the poorest of the poor in New York City and really see the opioid epidemic in action. So, there can be lots of social work for relatively healthy patients who do not have primary care, as well as some very sad cases of advanced disease. I guess the location as a trauma center is a pro and a con in terms of contributing to volume and exposure, but sometimes you just want there to be a regular cafeteria in the lobby and be able to relate more to your patients.

As a city hospital, there is also a fair amount of general disorganization and inefficiencies. The TY residents rotate through a lot of departments with varying expectations that are not always defined. The orientation could be much better in terms of introducing TY residents to each department. Schedules are created haphazardly, sometimes given days before a rotation in a new department begins. Only the medicine and EM department uses an online scheduling system. EMR is Quadramed. Quality of nursing varies by floor and acuity. Residents are expected to run labs and transport patients. Also, there are limited elective offerings for TY residents (no medical subspecialties, no opthalmology elective, no tailor-made electives), although there may be more electives being approved this year. Highly recommend clarifying any changes to the schedule for next year prior to ranking this program, particularly given the change in leadership.

Good luck!
 

starwarsfan123

2+ Year Member
Jan 11, 2017
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Thank you for the thorough post. Indeed, it is very much appreciated and thoughtful of you.

I know you explained that this program is ideal for an applicant with a procedural or critical care flavor. Could you perhaps expand more on "they preferred to spend more time on surgical and emergency services, less on inpatient medical floors"

For example, what kind of applicant would prefer to a prelim program over lincoln TY that is in a safe neighborhood/predom english speaking with lets say (5 months of Wards, 2 months ICU, 1 month night float, 4 months electives)?

Thanks for any advice.


Lincoln TY - 2017 Update

Hi everyone - The original posting from 2014-2015 was very helpful to me when I ranked programs so I thought I would take the time to write an update regarding the program, although I have never posted before.

Overall: Well-balanced internship in terms of alternating difficult months with relaxed months. Strongest rotations in terms of all-around learning experiences are MICU, SICU, General Surgery (Emergency General Surgery), and Emergency Medicine. Lincoln Hospital is a level-1 trauma center with a high volume emergency room. This program is ideal for the applicant going into an advanced program with a procedural or critical care flavor. Most of the interns chose this program over a prelim medicine year because they preferred to spend more time on surgical and emergency services, less on inpatient medical floors. The program also allows for 3 elective blocks.

Changes since original post include the appointment of a new residency director this past summer. The interview also no longer includes an essay or group interview - there are 2 faculty interviews, informal discussion with current residents, tour of the hospital, and finished by noon. Otherwise, rotations are about the same with 2 blocks of inpatient medical floors (2 weeks are night float), 1 block of medicine clinic, 1 block of MICU, 1 block of SICU, 1 block of surgical floors, 2 blocks of EM (19 night shifts, 19 day shifts), 1 block of OB/GYN, 3 blocks of electives (radiology, anesthesiology, research are typical if approved), and 1 block vacation. Blocks are 4 weeks long and they are very strict about taking vacation in a 4-week block, which can make it difficult if you need time at the end. There is also only 3 days of sick leave available. Although CIR (union) provides money to attend a conference, this needs to be approved by the director and scheduled during elective block.

Negatives to the program include its location in the South Bronx- be prepared to serve the poorest of the poor in New York City and really see the opioid epidemic in action. So, there can be lots of social work for relatively healthy patients who do not have primary care, as well as some very sad cases of advanced disease. I guess the location as a trauma center is a pro and a con in terms of contributing to volume and exposure, but sometimes you just want there to be a regular cafeteria in the lobby and be able to relate more to your patients.

As a city hospital, there is also a fair amount of general disorganization and inefficiencies. The TY residents rotate through a lot of departments with varying expectations that are not always defined. The orientation could be much better in terms of introducing TY residents to each department. Schedules are created haphazardly, sometimes given days before a rotation in a new department begins. Only the medicine and EM department uses an online scheduling system. EMR is Quadramed. Quality of nursing varies by floor and acuity. Residents are expected to run labs and transport patients. Also, there are limited elective offerings for TY residents (no medical subspecialties, no opthalmology elective, no tailor-made electives), although there may be more electives being approved this year. Highly recommend clarifying any changes to the schedule for next year prior to ranking this program, particularly given the change in leadership.

Good luck!
 
Jul 14, 2018
1
0
Lincoln Medical Center Transitional Year Review 2014-2015

Overall:
The program was my first choice, and I would choose the same program again as my top choice. There is no malignancy. No residents quit, get fired, or are on academic probation as per PD. Residents who need to interview for advanced spots are given the time off. Hours are quite good and I have down time to relax, study, get coffee, and eat outside in the courtyard on 90% of work days. Ty year residents are treated in high regards by attendings and nurses.

The South Bronx is an underserved area. For its zip code it is one of the poorest, with the most dialects spoken, one of the highest rates of comorbidities (mainly DM and obesity), and many high risk pregnancies. Patients are quite thankful for the service that is provided. The ER is the third busiest single center ER in the country. It's a level 1 trauma center and you'll see many GSW, MVA, and other high acuity trauma. You'll also see peds trauma occasionally.

Teaching:
On the core rotations surgery has 4 hours of conference on Thursdays, medicine has noon conference and teaching rounds daily, MICU has 2-4 hours of teaching rounds per day. We have a SimMan were we run codes and practice exam skills, multiple central line and air way mannequins, suturing equipment and laparoscopic equipment. However, on rotations without residents such as radiology or anesthesiology there is no formal conferences, but if you express interest all attending will go out of their way to teach you what they know. The ty year residents meet 1-2 times per month for one hour for teaching rounds and discussion of improvements to the residency or rotations.

Evaluations:
After every rotation you must collect surveys from one attending, nurse and peer. Do not worry about this.

House Staff:
There are department sponsored events. Christmas party dinner this year was at Calle Ocho with a three course meal. Also, had a picnic in prospect park with Dinosaur BBQ. CIR (resident union) also plans picnics and events. Spouses/boyfriends/girlfriends always welcome. Residents also have their own individual parties as well as. Attendings often buy coffee and meals (almost everyday on MICU with certain attendings).

Safety:
Police stationed at every entrance in hospital. No issues that I'm aware of. Never been messed with. However, some patients get verbally abusive in the ED; comes with the job of an ED physician.

Benefits:
Salary: $55,585 (2014-2015) +$500 for orientation and $2500/yr extra from residency Union CIR
$650 for books/laptop/iPad/step 3
$1200 for travel for abstract presentations (plotter printers for posters available in house).
FICA insurance is placed into a personal Prudential retirement account at $5000/yr
No cost dental, vision, and health insurance. Free prescription coverage is limited to $500/yr, but you can opt to pay a low monthly cost for total prescription coverage.
Premium pretax transit card for unlimited subway and bus anywhere in NYC is $100/month out of your salary if wanted.
UES UWS 1br prewar walk ups cost $1700-2000/mo. Bronx 1br by hospital ~$1200/mo.
I have enough money for 1br on UES, cable, Internet, ibr on my student loans, subway unlimited card, wash and fold service and maid service to clean my place biweekly. I also eat most every meal out. 20min commute by subway.

Rotations::
Hard:
SICU One Month (M-Saturday 6a-6p but often stay until 8p)
MICU One Month (m-f 730a-730p) two golden weekends and two weekend days on call (730a-730p)

Medium:
EM Two Months (19 12hour shifts per month) (8a-8p or 8p-8a - split in blocks each for two weeks per month)
IM Two Months(7:00-5p when not on call) (q4 call 7:00a-8p)
Surgery (6a-6p M-F)- one weekend day call (6a-6p) and one weekend night call (6p-6a)
OB clinic two weeks (easy) and L&D two weeks (630a-3pmish m-f)

Easy:
Vacation 1 month
3 elective months (most choose: anesthesiology, radiology, and a research month- no call, overnights, or weekends on electives; can take a few personal days off)
Anesthesiology (M-F 7:30a-early afternoon)
Radiology: (M-F 9am-early afternoon)
Research: take Step 3 and work on an independent research or quality improvement project
Medicine Clinic (1:30p-7:30p M-F)
Two weeks at the end of the year are given off regardless of the rotation to give time to move to your next program.

The bad:
Hospital was built mid century, and parts are old and outdated as you'd imagine a public hospital would be (ie SICU has no windows). Medicine clinics and ER are brand new and medicine and inpatient floors look good.

Nurses in New York State are unionized and you may find yourself performing blood draws, blood cultures, and a-sticks more often than your peers outside of New York State. Nurses in Clinic, SICU, and MICU are amazing, but you'll do occasional blood draws in ED, surgery, and medicine for the 5 months you're there.

Translator phones will be required for 50% of patient encounters if you don't speak Spanish. This adds double the time for all encounters but is expected and you're given ample time. Patients truly appreciate being able to speak their native language and often thank you profusely for taking the time to use a translator phone. Rarely, I get a patient who speaks an uncommon dialect and the translator service has to page me back in 5-15min when they find someone.

Switching services every month is a little clunky. You are often oriented on the first day of your new rotation. However, it has been my experience that the residents and attendings recognize you as a brand new resident to the service and orient you as they would on July 1st; so you're often not far behind the pgy-1 resident on that specialty. The ty residents call each other the weekend before switching services to get sign out on patients, find out where and when to show up, attending preferences, tips and tricks of the rotation, etc. We tried starting an online forum but nobody ended up using it.

Quadramed EMR (Epic implementation supposedly 2017) has its quirks and often loses notes; must save notes as partial often and copy your progress with ctrl+c.

The interview:
Starts around 8:30a->Quick presentation by PD->group interview->individual essay->tour-> interview with PD-> home in early afternoon 1-2p. Interview may give a malignant vibe with group interviews, one quick PD interview, and individual essays, but this is only a quirk of the interview process and should not be taken as a reflection of the program. It may be hard to express interest in the program during the interview day, but send a post-interview thank you note to the PD and keep in touch to express interest in the programs that you'll be ranking highly.

Final Words:
I think this program is a diamond in the rough and is often times overlooked or unheard of. However, if you're looking for a relaxed residency in NYC I'd definitely recommend it.

THANK YOU. Better than the interview day itself.
 
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