iraqiamerican

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Does anybody have that link where it tell you specificly which bio topics to study?

Thanks :)
 

pre_opt_sku

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iraqiamerican said:
Does anybody have that link where it tell you specificly which bio topics to study?

Thanks :)
I don't know of anything specific other than the OAT guide from www.opted.org.
 

Rusunn

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iraqiamerican said:
Does anybody have that link where it tell you specificly which bio topics to study?

Thanks :)
According to my Kaplan lesson book, the topics are:
Cell and Molecular biology, diversity of life, Vertebrate Anatomy, Development biology, Evolution, and Ecology. From what I experienced (your test might be different), I found these to be emphasized the most on the OAT.
 
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iraqiamerican

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Rusunn said:
According to my Kaplan lesson book, the topics are:
Cell and Molecular biology, diversity of life, Vertebrate Anatomy, Development biology, Evolution, and Ecology. From what I experienced (your test might be different), I found these to be emphasized the most on the OAT.
where do you get this lesson book from! I dont understand why Kaplan did not publish it with the new 2005 edition :thumbdown:
 

Rusunn

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iraqiamerican said:
where do you get this lesson book from! I dont understand why Kaplan did not publish it with the new 2005 edition :thumbdown:
When you sign up for either the Kaplan OAT classroom course, online course or tutoring, they send you two textbooks. The first is the Kaplan OAT lesson book, which basically is an outline of each classroom lesson. the 2nd is a 1000 page review text and this is an exhaustive review of all the sciences (bio,chem.orgo,phys). You can’t go to the bookstore and buy these books. You need to be registered for a Kaplan course.
 

gioiarioia

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Don't waste your money and time on the Kaplan course just for those books! I used the Kaplan MCAT Comphrehensive Review Book (available at Borders, or any bookstore can order if not in stock). About 1000 pages and tells you everything you need to know. I have taken the OAT twice and my scores in every category jumped about 40 points (some 60) just from studying the MCAT review book.

I also purchased the Kaplan OAT Practice Test Book... this is a good way to practice tests that actually are like the OAT (versus MCAT). In the front of this book it lists the specific subjects. However, be aware that it does not include everything... I know from taking the test twice that anything is fair game. So if you are trying to narrow down your subjects for study, I wouldn't. Take the time to do the work that is necessary for your success on the OAT.

I highly advise taking the computerized version versus the written test. I know it is all that is available now, but I really think that the self-paced nature of the test allows the student to perform much better.
 

iraqiamerican

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Ok guys below is what I was looking for.
Do you think their are any extra topics that they did not mention?
Survey of the Natural Sciences
Biology: Cell and Molecular Biology – origin of life; cell metabolism (including photosynthesis); enzymology; cellular processes; thermodynamics; organelle structure and function; mitosis/meiosis; Diversity of Life: Biological Organization and Relationship of Major Taxa monera, plantae, animalia, protista, fungi, etc.) using the five-kingdom system; Vertebrate
Anatomy and Physiology: Structure and function of Systems- integumentary, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, immunological, digestive, respiratory, urinary, nervous/senses, endocrine, and reproductive; Developmental Biology - fertilization, descriptive embryology, and developmental mechanics; Genetics – molecular genetics, human genetics, classical genetics, and chromosomal genetics; Evolution, Ecology, and Behavior - natural selection, population genetics/speciation, cladistics, population and community ecology, ecosystems, animal behavior (including social behavior).

General Chemistry: Stoichiometry and General Concepts - percent composition, empirical formulae, balancing equations, moles and molecular formulas, molar mass, density, and calculations from balanced equations; Gases - kinetic molecular theory of gases, Dalton’s, Boyle’s, Charles, and ideal gas laws; Liquids and Solids - intermolecular forces, phase changes, vapor pressure, structures, polarity, and properties; Solutions - polarity, properties (colligative, non-colligative), forces, and concentration calculations; Acids and Bases - pH, strength, Bronsted-Lowry reactions, calculations; Chemical Equilibria - molecular, acid/base, precipitation, calculations, and Le Chatelier’s principle; Thermodynamics and Thermochemistry– laws of thermodynamics, Hess’ law, spontaneity, enthalpies and entropies, and heat transfer; Chemical Kinetics - rate laws, activation energy, and half life; Oxidation-Reduction Reactions - balancing equations, determination of oxidation numbers, electrochemical calculations, and electrochemical concepts and terminology; Atomic and Molecular Structure - electron configuration, orbital types, Lewis-Dot diagrams, atomic theory, quantum theory, molecular geometry, bond types, and sub-atomic particles; Periodic Properties -representative elements, transition elements, periodic trends, and descriptive chemistry; Nuclear Reactions - balancing equations, binding energy, decay processes, particles, and terminology; Laboratory - basic techniques, equipment, error analysis, safety, and data analysis.

Organic Chemistry: Mechanism (Energetics, Structure, and Stability of Intermediates) - SN1, SN2, elimination, addition, free radical, and substitution mechanisms; Chemical and Physical Properties of Molecules and Organic Analysis - inter and intra molecular forces, separation, introductory infrared spectroscopy, 1HNMR spectroscopy, 13CNMR, chemical identification, stability, solubility, and polarity; Stereochemistry - conforma¬tional analysis, optical activity, chirality, chiral centers, planes of symmetry, enantiomers, diastereomers, and meso compounds; Nomenclature - IUPAC rules, and functional groups in molecules; Individual Reactions of the Major Functional Groups and Combinations of Reactions to Synthesize Compounds; Acid-Base Chemistry - resonance effects, inductive results, and prediction of products and equilibria; Aromatics and Bonding - concept of aromaticity, resonance, atomic orbitals, molecular orbitals, hybridization, bond angles, and bond lengths.

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Ability to read, organize, analyze, and remember new information in optometry and the sciences. Ability to comprehend thoroughly when studying scientific information. Reading materials are typical of the level of material encountered in the first year of optometry school and require no prior knowledge of the topic other than a basic undergraduate preparation in science. The Reading Comprehension Test will contain three different reading passages.

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