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Looking for challenge test questions

Discussion in 'DAT Discussions' started by Hope30, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. Hope30

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    Hey guys, I am opening this thread to request all, each to post a very challenging science question so all can attempt to answer. I believe this can be a way to learn and challenge each others. We all can improve. :thumbup:
     
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  3. tayloreve

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    This will be interesting :D
     
  4. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Alright, I just went thru the Kaplan's Molecular Genetics workshop and came across some things I haven't seen in other prep materials. Ok, you asked for it lol...

    1. What is the difference between euchromatin and heterochromatin?
    2. What is the difference between Huntington Disease and Cystic Fibrosis in terms of type of mutation?
    3. Why is the mitochondrial genome inherited from the mother?
    4. What are the two types of translocation of chromosomal material?
    5. What is difference between mosaicism and chimerism?
    6. What is difference between monoploidy and polyploidy?
    7. What are differences among monosomy, trisomy and tetrasomy?
    8. What is the Loop-Scaffold complex and during what phase in Mitosis is this seen?
    9. What are differences among Direct Repair, Base Excision Repair, Mismatch Repair and Nucleotide Excision Repair.
    10. What is difference between transition substitution and transversion substitution in translation mutations?
     
  5. rpatel8

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    I'll start the answering off for the first few.

    1) Euchromatin is areas where DNA is loosely attached to nucleosomes and is actively being trascribed while heterochromatin is where it is more tightly packed to nucleosomes.
    2)Cystic fibrosis is inherited as autosomal recessive and and Huntington is autosomal dominant.
    4) Simple and reciprocal.
     
  6. Hope30

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    6) monoploidy- one set of chromosome, polypoidy- many sets of chromosome
    7) monosomy- only one chromosome (no pair), trisomy- three chromosomes linked together at the cetromere, tetrasomy- four chromosomes
    10) transition substitution- substitution of one purine to another purine (A to G) or a pyrimidine to another pyrimidine (C to T) during mutation. Transversion substitution- substitution of one purine to another pyrimidine.

    Multiple choices next time. Lol the more the questions resemble the test the better.
     
  7. Hope30

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    I shoot out one easy question from my head.

    How many CO2 are produced during Kreb cycle?
    A) 2 B) 4 C) 6 D) 10
     
  8. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Here's a practical question for you ladies:

    Name of the gland and the overproduction of this hormone that causes masculinizing effects in females such as excess facial hair.
     
  9. LetsGo2DSchool

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    And a question for the boys...

    What is the type of cell that produces man juice (aka sperm)?
     
  10. KyoPhan

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    Is this the adrenal cortex?
     
  11. PooyaH

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    That'd be Sertoli cells. Also, know that FSH enhances man juice production, and LH enhances Leydig cells to produce testosterone.

    For ladies, estrogen is made by granulosa cells which is enhanced by FSH, and theca cells are enhanced by LH and produce androgens which signal granulosa cells to make more estrogen.
     
  12. PooyaH

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    Yeah, that'd be due to too much androgen production.
     
  13. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Yes, the adrenal cortex produces androgen (male sex hormone) in both males and females. Overproduction of adrenal androgen in females will cause a female to look like a tranny.
     
  14. FROGGBUSTER

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    Technically, if you're talking about the juice part of man juice (semen), I would say the 3 glands: seminal vesicles, prostate gland, & bulbourethral gland. :D
     
  15. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Yes, you sure do know your man juice.
     
  16. PooyaH

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    True that. I was referring to the main ingredient lol. I should've specified though. Only it's 4 in the morning here and somehow I'm still up!
     
  17. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Is that pun intended lol?
     
  18. PooyaH

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    No pun intended kid! At least not here on SDN lol.
     
  19. LetsGo2DSchool

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    What are the two things oxytocin hormone do?
     
  20. Hope30

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    Oxytocin- a hormone secreted by posterior lobes. Two things- eject milk and smooth the uterus for contraction during birth. :eek:*
     
  21. needzmoar

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  22. LetsGo2DSchool

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    Oxytocin does stimulate milk secretion. However, oxytocin doesn't smooth the uterus. It increases uterine contractions during labor. Shame on you girl!
     
  23. terry gordy

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    - Why does lithium have a higher oxidation potential than potassium. Yet, potassium has a lower first ionization energy than lithium (recall periodic trends)....explain.

    - Consider methylenecyclohexane. When it is treated with HBr in the presence of a peroxide, we get addition to the alkene. Explain why bromine does not attach to the allylic carbon. Does this contradict your knowledge of radical stability (recall radical stability and hammond's postulate are used to explain the observed product which you are probably familiar with)?
     
    #22 terry gordy, Jul 26, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  24. terry gordy

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    In the gaseous phase, tertiary amines are generally the most basic. In aqueous solution, secondary amines are generally more basic than tertiary amines. Explain this observation.
     

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