Mar 12, 2010
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Pre-Medical
I applied to med school last year at my only state school. I did not get accepted. My GPA is about a 3.8 with my sGPA around 3.65. My MCAT score was only a 26, which I am sure I can raise to at least a 33. My departmental letter of recomendation was not good because of some attitude problems I had in the past. My plan is to raise my MCAT and to also come complete a second degree in chemistry next year, giving me a double major of biology and chemistry. This will hopefully give me the chance to improve my letter of recommendation. Also I intend on shadowing and volunteering more. Would it be wise for me to apply in the next cycle? or should I wait to apply to the one afterwards?
 

hobbes23

10+ Year Member
Dec 11, 2007
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Wait a cycle. You want to re-apply when you can show that you improved your app.

It sounds like you have a plan to improve:
- raising GPA (probably not necessary given a 3.8)
- retake MCAT
- shadowing and volunteering
- new LORs
- improved maturity

Follow through with your plan and then re-apply. I would also suggest applying to more than one school. Are you really wanting to stay in-state? Did you receive an interview?

Can you do an "exit interview" with them? They will best know about your application and what their particular school wants in an applicant.
 
Mar 12, 2010
16
0
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Wait a cycle. You want to re-apply when you can show that you improved your app.

It sounds like you have a plan to improve:
- raising GPA (probably not necessary given a 3.8)
- retake MCAT
- shadowing and volunteering
- new LORs
- improved maturity

Follow trough with your plan and then re-apply. I would also suggest applying to more than one school. Are you really wanting to stay in-state?
No, but I thought with my stats I would only get into the state school
 

dragonfly99

10+ Year Member
May 15, 2008
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Attending Physician
State schools are not necessarily always easier to get in. Sometimes it looks that way if you only look at the grade and MCAT averages. But sometimes the schools have a certain type of person they are looking for (such as one who wants to work in rural areas) and if on paper you do not fit that, you might have trouble getting in. Also, some schools have relatively small admissions committees and they may take a dislike (or like) to a particular candidate. You may just not fit the profile of a student they want to take. All med school candidates should apply broadly, unless for some reason you are not willing or able to move - this mostly should apply just to married people, etc. who are older with kids (most of the time). You should apply to a whole bunch of schools...low number would be like 7 or 8...going crazy would be like 35 or something.

Raising the MCAT score would help. the GPA is good already. You will have a hard time if there is something bad in any of your LOR's...so you had better mend fences in your department, and/or get into a new department where you can get a decent LOR. You had better make sure you volunteer enough to get a feel of what the medical world is like.
 
Jul 28, 2009
143
1
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I applied to med school last year at my only state school. I did not get accepted. My GPA is about a 3.8 with my sGPA around 3.65. My MCAT score was only a 26, which I am sure I can raise to at least a 33. My departmental letter of recomendation was not good because of some attitude problems I had in the past. My plan is to raise my MCAT and to also come complete a second degree in chemistry next year, giving me a double major of biology and chemistry. This will hopefully give me the chance to improve my letter of recommendation. Also I intend on shadowing and volunteering more. Would it be wise for me to apply in the next cycle? or should I wait to apply to the one afterwards?
Definitely retake the MCAT - even with a high GPA, you need a good MCAT score to confirm to the adcoms that you didn't just take a bunch of easy A classes to get that 3.8. As for taking additional time off. Taking 1-2 years off to do some research and shadow some doctors (in addition to studying for the MCAT) is a very wise decision. Med schools see this as a more serious sacrifice than just reapplying willy-nilly. If you feel that you need more time to bolster your application then do it, you might be able to get into a more competitive school the next time you reapply.

Also work on that attitude problem - that could definitely be a problem when you go into medical school or when you become a resident and have to deal with ungrateful patients and demanding attendings.