Low gpa ADVICE NEEDED!!! gpa too low for post bacc or SMP?

samac

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Wow that was a long post. I ended up skimming, so sorry if I missed something.
A 2.6 definitely isn't good, but it's not the worst I heard of. You said your science is a little lower what is it exactly? Not telling isn't helping, a 2.55 vs a 2.4 is a huge difference.
For DO schools you can retake the classes you got a C or below and get those GPAs above a 3.0.
Your MCAT isn't good. It's very mediocre. I recommend retaking that, it may be expired by the time you apply and it'll also be a situation where you're up against all new MCATs.
 

QueenJames

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Do a DIY postbacc. Sign up for courses at a nearby 4-year and CC and knock out as many retakes as you can. Study up for the MCAT the following summer and nail that. Apply right away.
 

Goro

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100% agree!


Do a DIY postbacc. Sign up for courses at a nearby 4-year and CC and knock out as many retakes as you can. Study up for the MCAT the following summer and nail that. Apply right away.
 

IslandStyle808

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Only read GPA.

1) Retake courses (DIY post-bacc)
2) Nail MCAT
3) Do some kick @ss ECs
4) Apply
5) Cash in your chips...
 
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What do you mean by DIY post bacc? How can I informal do a post bacc is what I'm trying to ask I guess. Would I still have to fill out applications to get accepted into the school I am wanting to do post bacc in? Not sure how an informal post bacc differs from a regular post bacc procedure wise when it comes to applying. Also will retaking the courses I got a C or lower in really make a difference in my application? It will boost up my undergrad gpa correct? And can someone elaborate please on what they mean by DO schools replacing grades in courses I did bad in.....is it as if I never got the bad grade in the first place? Will they still see the bad grade when I fill out Aacomas come time to applying??
 

IslandStyle808

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What do you mean by DIY post bacc?

DIY post bacc. means do it your self post-baccalaureate (you are an unclassified students doing courses)

How can I informal do a post bacc is what I'm trying to ask I guess. Would I still have to fill out applications to get accepted into the school I am wanting to do post bacc in?

It depends on how your university works. I just simple fill out some forms at my graduate department and the department give the okay.

Not sure how an informal post bacc differs from a regular post bacc procedure wise when it comes to applying. Also will retaking the courses I got a C or lower in really make a difference in my application?

Informal post-bacc is cheaper and you an literally retake the courses you did badly in. Oh heck yeah retaking will make a difference because unlike AMCAS (MD school application service), the AACOMAS (DO school application services) will literal replace your grades instead of average them. So all those C's and below are wiped clean with your retakes when GPA calculations are being done (however this means you have to get a better grade on the retake). Previous bad grades will be still seen.

It will boost up my undergrad gpa correct?

Correct

And can someone elaborate please on what they mean by DO schools replacing grades in courses I did bad in.....is it as if I never got the bad grade in the first place? Will they still see the bad grade when I fill out Aacomas come time to applying??

Let's say you had 2.0 GPA in your freshman year and hypothetically you retook every single course your sophomore year and got a 4.0 GPA. It won't be averaged to a 3.0 GPA, it will taken as a 4.0 GPA. This is the power of grade replacement. However, yes, they will see the bad grades. When it comes time for applications, I would rather be the guy with retake coming in with a 3.5 GPA than no retakes and a 3.0 GPA. This will determine whether you get an interview and acceptance.
Read above
 
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Would it be okay to study to retake the mcat first after I graduate so that way I can see if I should still pursue this career? It'd be a waste of time to do a self post bacc and then retake the mcat a second time and not get a higher score. I'm going to work hard tho to make sure I get a much higher score but what do y'all think?
 

QueenJames

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I say retake the courses and regain some of that confidence back before strapping down to take the MCAT. I retook both semesters of O-chem and whatdoyaknow.. there was A LOT of O-chem on my MCAT back in late 2014. I didn't actually study the O-chem portion for my MCAT because I had just finished retaking both semesters and aced them and finally understood it... I got the highest score on my bio section out of all three sections. These pre-req courses are very important to have a grip on and understanding of in my honest opinion. Plus, you can squeeze in biochem for the new MCAT and get a better understanding of the new MCAT.

Also... no.. it's not about if you SHOULD pursue this career, but if you WANT to. You got this. Plenty of people have to jump through the same hoops you are currently trying to get through and they have succeeded. If you are contemplating doing something for your GPA then you already know you want this. Coming from someone who was in the same boat as you (low GPA... contemplating DIY postbacc...) I say go for it.

HOWEVER! It WILL take some time. You dug yourself a very deep hole and it will take time getting back out of it. It's ok. You can do it!
 
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Thank you so much for the encouraging words!!!

I've already retaken my ochem courses 1 and 2 (I originally withdrawed the first time around because I knew I wasn't going to manage a good grade in there) and so after retaking it last semester I got a B! (Could've been an A if I had tried harder) And I took biochem this summer and got an A in that since I actually tried hard in and it was a subject I fell in love with.

With that being said that's why I was considering focusing on the mcat first after graduating. Do you think with an exceptionally MUCH higher mcat the second time around I could possibly have adm people overlook my gpa when applying for DO schools? My parents are also pushing me to study the mcat right after graduating too and want me to focus on that thinking that some med schools might overlook my poor gpa
(I know I shouldn't listen to what the parents say too and should do what I think is right for my situation but are they wrong?)
 

IslandStyle808

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Remember that schools have cut offs for both GPA and MCAT. If your GPA is not high enough, then you won't even get to the interview stage. Even if you take the MCAT score great and apply immediate, you won't fair well if your GPA is not good enough. There are schools with bare minimums of 3.2 to 3.25 for both GPAs. So don't apply until you get your GPA at least above a 3.2 (ideally you want to be at 3.4-3.5).
 

QueenJames

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Thank you so much for the encouraging words!!!

I've already retaken my ochem courses 1 and 2 (I originally withdrawed the first time around because I knew I wasn't going to manage a good grade in there) and so after retaking it last semester I got a B! (Could've been an A if I had tried harder) And I took biochem this summer and got an A in that since I actually tried hard in and it was a subject I fell in love with.

With that being said that's why I was considering focusing on the mcat first after graduating. Do you think with an exceptionally MUCH higher mcat the second time around I could possibly have adm people overlook my gpa when applying for DO schools? My parents are also pushing me to study the mcat right after graduating too and want me to focus on that thinking that some med schools might overlook my poor gpa
(I know I shouldn't listen to what the parents say too and should do what I think is right for my situation but are they wrong?)
No offense.. but parents don't know jack **** about the med school process. They know of so and so who had a such and such GPA that was low but a such and such high MCAT with such and such experience and that you certainly have a shot. NO. DO NOT RUSH IT. Take the MCAT when you are ready. You already did ehhh (once again.. no offense) and this is your chance to prove yourself.

You wouldn't happen to belong to an Asian/Indian/Desi fam by any chance would you? If so, that's exactly what I am talking about lololol
 
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Repeat ur pre requiring classes, then that your mcat. If your score is sub 505, I would say give up. With an outstanding MCAT, it's worthwhile to further fix your GPA, low mcat will simply murder your chance consider the gpa you start with.
 
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Hi all,

I'm currently a premed senior about to finish up my last semester of college. I will be graduating fall 2015! However, my gpa is really low and I know it's not competitive enough for any MD or DO med schools.

My gpa is......here it is.......cumulative 2.6., and science gpa is a little lower.......I am so embarrassed to even type it. But I am more dedicated now than ever to fix my mistakes and to make med school happen. I KNOW I can succeed in this path to medicine and I know I would make a great physician someday!! I come from a very diverse background, I have traveled to a diff country and have seen the diff in healthcare systems they have in third world countries compared to the USA. I have clinical experience and plan to get even more experience working in the hospital again. I also plan to tutor as a way to show that my grades are not a reflection of my knowledge. There is more to my resume but I can't write it all.

I've been looking into doing either a post bacc or masters program before applying to med school. However I'm worried that my gpa is too low to even get into any program. Is there any way I can get my undergrad gpa overlooked somehow? I also already took the MCAT before they changed the exam and got a 26 (not great but no horrible, still not high enough near the score I wanted), so I plan to retake it after I graduate.

Also, should I just focus on retaking the mcat and scoring much higher first after I graduate in the fall? Or should I focus on TRYING to get into a post bacc/smp program first? And what should I do if my gpa keeps me from getting into any kind of program?! Really lost and desperate for helpful advice!!!

So what do you think is the best route for my situation? Please no rude or hurtful comments.

Thanks for your time!!!

Hello premedinpearls. I am in a very similar situation. From what I've heard from my local med school admission offices and my pre-health advisor is that it depends on where or maybe when the GPA mistakes occurred and which medical programs you want to apply to. I am not an expert, I just hope I can help you with the advice I was given.

If the mistakes occurred earlier in your college career, in let's say general chemistry and organic chemistry where you might have gotten C's then taking advanced biochemistry and obtaining an A would show mass improvement because biochemistry requires knowledge of general and organic chemistry. This is why some medical schools prefer you to take upper division undergraduate biological courses to mend a low GPA. This can be pricey because the upper division courses would need to be taken at a university. For this option you can do a post baccalaureate program. Some post bacc programs will make you retake all the pre-reqs and some will offer upper division courses or others offer a combination of the two.

On the other hand, since Graduate GPA's and undergraduate GPA's are separate a master's program may help since graduate courses are more advanced. The issue with graduate programs for some med schools is that they are too focused and that some graduate programs may have grade inflation. My local DO and MD medical schools say they consider graduate programs a better way to mend a low GPA.

I am applying to both graduate programs and post bac's, I don't want to limit myself. You have to fight for yourself! You are a unique and persistent individual and you should let them know it. If you have a positive trend milk it! Tell them why your GPA is low and what you've learned. Schools love a person who is willing to ask for help so don't say I fixed my problems all by myself. Mention office hours, tutoring or going to a learning specialist.

Regarding the MCAT. I don't know if this will help you, but I know for this application cycle some medical schools are accepting sub 500 scores because it is a new exam. Next year as the number of test takers increases so will the average exam scores so that means that MCAT score will need to be above a 500