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Sep 12, 2020
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Hi All!

I am currently pursuing my master's in counseling to become a licensed professional counselor (CACREP program; 100-hr prac, 600-hr internship) and love the wellness model our profession operates from. That being said, I do have an interest in also obtaining a PsyD (from my quick research, this is more clinically focused than a PhD, and I'm not completely tied to it) in the future for a variety of reasons (insurance acceptability, potential career opportunities, international opportunities with MSF, and of course, more learning :)). I'm not interested in a PhD in Counselor Ed because I'm not interested in teaching.

I hope to transition into a part-time program where I could continue to practice as an LPC (obtaining the doc degree over a number of years is totally fine as long as I can still be seeing clients as an LPC!). Looking for in-person options that may have some opportunity to 'transfer' my grad classes (this isn't that crucial, more money-saving). Additional points for programs with a focus on social justice and wellness - I'd also like to find some solid, APA accredited programs.

Here's the snag: my husband will begin applying for law schools at the end of this year, so we don't know where we may end up! That being said, we're almost MORE flexible because of this if anyone has a program they loved.

There is time to figure this out, and I thought I would float this out in case someone had some wisdom.

Thanks for your time and thoughts
 
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summerbabe

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That being said, I do have an interest in also obtaining a PsyD (from my quick research, this is more clinically focused than a PhD, and I'm not completely tied to it)
All PhD and PsyD programs have a strong clinical focus since every graduate is license-eligible and reputable programs take their gatekeeping roles seriously. The differences are likely with research expectations and participation.

I hope to transition into a part-time program where I could continue to practice as an LPC (obtaining this over a number of years is totally fine as long as I can still be seeing clients!)....I'd also like to find some solid, APA accredited programs.
As far as I know, these 2 aims will be incompatible, unfortunately, even if part-time doctoral study may be available in other fields. I knew people in grad school with LPCs and independent practice experience but they completed practicum like everybody else during the program and were prohibited from working while in school.

I would be very, very, very wary about any program that offers part-time study. I also knew people in graduate school who ran into situation where they wren't able to attend full-time and they would generally end up taking leaves of absences, rather than drop down to part-time.

Looking for in-person options that may have some opportunity to 'transfer' my grad classes (this isn't that crucial, more money-saving).
My understanding is that while some programs may allow you to waive courses if they've been taken at the graduate level, you'll still need to take electives in lieu to reach the credit thresholds for graduation.
 

beginner2011

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That being said, I do have an interest in also obtaining a PsyD (from my quick research, this is more clinically focused than a PhD, and I'm not completely tied to it) in the future for a variety of reasons (insurance acceptability, potential career opportunities, international opportunities with MSF, and of course, more learning :)).
1. The difference in income is unlikely to outweigh the costs of obtaining doctoral level training if your plan is to provide psychotherapy. Especially if you're almost finished with training at the master's level.
2. What career opportunities, specifically? If you're just planning to do psychotherapy there are very few differences in career opportunities.
3. I'm not familiar with MSF, but I'd be surprised if a PsyD is strongly preferred over an LPC for international psychotherapy.
4. You don't need to be a student to continue learning. Please do not discount the fact that you will continue learning long after you've completed your degree.
 
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MamaPhD

Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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Aug 2, 2010
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If I'm following correctly, you're married to a lawyer-to-be and your spouse's career henceforth will determine your location. I know so many lawyer-mental health professional couples and this is usually the arrangement. Being tied to your husband's law school location makes you less flexible, not more. Admission rates for doctoral programs are low no matter where you go (I'm excluding unaccredited or poor quality programs that will take anyone with a pulse). Also, part-time study while practicing as an LPC is not a realistic plan. I suggest that you focus on developing your practice as a newly licensed LPC, get the best continuing education and mentoring you can to develop your skills, and re-assess whether a doctoral degree really suits your aims after you've gotten some experience.

Also, I don't know how any of the above squares with your interest in international work, but I suppose this is not something you're seriously planning to do any time soon (anyway, mental health positions in MSF usually require no more than a master's degree).
 
Sep 12, 2020
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Thanks all for your thoughts/suggestions. This has given me some things to ponder on moving forward!
 
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