M.D. from China anyone?

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da8s0859q

my bad, i thought it's very important for doctors to be altruistic and willing to serve the underserved. maybe i am just idealistic and have been sheltered from the cruelty of the real world.

Dunno if I'd call it the result of excessive sheltering, but I think you'll find that altruism isn't nearly as rampant in medicine as you'd expect. Idealistic, sure.

A local doc in practice for over a decade once told me how medicine is, for him, simply a means to an end (family, etc.). It is not, mind you, an end in itself.

God bless those that see it as such (die-hard surgeons, etc.). I'm just not one of them. It's a cool job with a lot of unique aspects to it - both good and bad - but at the end of the day, it's still a job, and one I would want to leave at the damn hospital.

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leftmid

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China is like Europe, in that students enter directly into medical studies from high school.

Do you or anyone happen to know how many of them want to quit medicine? And how many actually quit? Thank you.
 

NonTradMed

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Do you or anyone happen to know how many of them want to quit medicine? And how many actually quit? Thank you.

Maybe I can answer that. I have two cousins who studied medicine in China as well as a family friends whose children studied medicine in China.

From what they tell me, many, many students learn that they do not like medicine and end up not practicing it or regretting their decision to do it. The reasons are numerous.

Healthcare in China is screwed up right now. The lack of job openings due to lack of hospital positions means many 'lower tiered' medical schools see unemployed graduates. Hospitals are also very, very dirty places and the biggest need for doctors are in the rural areas (where no self respecting doctors want to go). Chinese doctors can see a big paycheck but they have to get scarce positions at hospitals, which is hard to do unless you went to a well known medical college.

Also, students in China test into medical school. There is no shadowing/volunteering/clinical experience required. The first time the vast majority of medical students see patients or been inside of a hospital is on their clinical rotations during their 4th or 5th year.

One of my parents' family friend's son who did this said the vast majority of his classmates hated medicine by the time rotation came around because they were allowed to see what practicing medicine was like for the first time. Remember all those premeds in US colleges that switch out of medicine for whatever reason? Well, in China, all premeds who test well into their chosen medical school WILL graduate as doctors. They have no option to switch.

My cousin who graduated from medical school a few years ago do not practice as a doctor. She works for the local medical school at an administrative position (which is actually seen as a better job than being a doctor). My other cousin who also graduated from med school hates her career because she has a hard time finding a job and feels all her hardwork is for nothing as she sees people in less demanding academic majors finding jobs and getting on with their lives.

I have to say, I have not heard any young person who actually enjoys the idea of being a doctor in China, mainly because the system does not encourage those who have an interest in medicine to enter it.

Instead a 17 year old who have had no experience exploring careers (b/c they have been busy cramming for the college entrance exam) will decide, based on test scores and on general interest (i.e on a whim), whether they want to apply to a medical school. Once they signed the med school up, if their score pass muster, they will end up a doctor in 5 or 6 years. Sucks to be in a system that shows so little flexibility, huh?
 
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leftmid

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Maybe I can answer that. I have two cousins who studied medicine in China as well as a family friends whose children studied medicine in China.

From what they tell me, many, many students learn that they do not like medicine and end up not practicing it or regretting their decision to do it. The reasons are numerous.

Healthcare in China is screwed up right now. The lack of job openings due to lack of hospital positions means many 'lower tiered' medical schools see unemployed graduates. Hospitals are also very, very dirty places and the biggest need for doctors are in the rural areas (where no self respecting doctors want to go). Chinese doctors can see a big paycheck but they have to get scarce positions at hospitals, which is hard to do unless you went to a well known medical college.

Also, students in China test into medical school. There is no shadowing/volunteering/clinical experience required. The first time the vast majority of medical students see patients or been inside of a hospital is on their clinical rotations during their 4th or 5th year.

One of my parents' family friend's son who did this said the vast majority of his classmates hated medicine by the time rotation came around because they were allowed to see what practicing medicine was like for the first time. Remember all those premeds in US colleges that switch out of medicine for whatever reason? Well, in China, all premeds who test well into their chosen medical school WILL graduate as doctors. They have no option to switch.

My cousin who graduated from medical school a few years ago do not practice as a doctor. She works for the local medical school at an administrative position (which is actually seen as a better job than being a doctor). My other cousin who also graduated from med school hates her career because she has a hard time finding a job and feels all her hardwork is for nothing as she sees people in less demanding academic majors finding jobs and getting on with their lives.

I have to say, I have not heard any young person who actually enjoys the idea of being a doctor in China, mainly because the system does not encourage those who have an interest in medicine to enter it.

Instead a 17 year old who have had no experience exploring careers (b/c they have been busy cramming for the college entrance exam) will decide, based on test scores and on general interest (i.e on a whim), whether they want to apply to a medical school. Once they signed the med school up, if their score pass muster, they will end up a doctor in 5 or 6 years. Sucks to be in a system that shows so little flexibility, huh?

I assume that everyone involved has a license to practice medicine or doesn't have any problem getting one.

It looks to me like there are too many medical schools and/or too many medical students in China. The other country that I've have heard of a similar situation is probably the Philippines. But it seems that a lot of medical students just don't pass the examination. I don't know anything about India or other countries (in Asian or Europe.) Would anyone care to enlighten me, please?

BTW, do the acupuncturists or homeopathic naturopathic providers have the same problem as MD in China?
 

Meatwad

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Ohhh, man; bad idea. They are giving you advanced standing because you have a BSc? No way, if you are 100% set on going there, do the ENTIRE program from Year 1-5 (although most Chinese schools are more like 5.5 years, according to their websites).

In the US, getting advanced standing in a medical school because of undergraduate classes means you will probably not be licensed in any state. I'm sure Europe, Asia, etc. are similar in their stringent policies towards licensing doctors (especially a foreign one, like yourself).

The ONLY legit way to get advanced standing at a med school anywhere on Earth is if you transfer from a med school. So I repeat: DO NOT TRANSFER INTO 2nd/3rd year, you will have wasted that seemingly insignificant 3-4k a year because your degree will be worthless in many areas of the world.

There are no shortcuts; no easy way out. If you want to be a doctor, do the right thing. It's going to take time and toil, not one or the other.
 

Meatwad

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It looks to me like there are too many medical schools and/or too many medical students in China. The other country that I've have heard of a similar situation is probably the Philippines.

This is grossly inaccurate, actually, quite the opposite is true. Medical schools will be closing in the Philippines in the next couple of years. At one point, classes were full in PI, but now, seats go unfilled at some schools (even with the increased interest from students abroad). The Philippines is in a big crisis, where no Filipinos are really interested in medicine. It's quicker and easier to get a visa to come to the US as a nurse, and the money is very good. $50,000 + USD is an unheard of salary to someone from the Philippines.

So there is definitely not a problem of too many medical students or schools in the Philippines.
 

Flopotomist

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Wait.. the op's sn implies s/he is pre/pharm... and it says so right underneath the SN also, so whey are we talking about an MD?
 

Meatwad

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Wait.. the op's sn implies s/he is pre/pharm... and it says so right underneath the SN also, so whey are we talking about an MD?

:laugh: I didn't even want to touch that, but I've seen more than one members with a permutation of "pharm," in their username and pre-pharm student in their status area asking about getting into medical school.

Probaly couldn't get into pharm school, so they assume a good backup is a foreign med school.
 

MattD

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I didn't read the whole thread and this probably doesn't even apply to the OP's situation, but it may be relevant to people considering going to med school in china...

The other day I was at the cardiologist and was having my annual echo. the echo tech was EXTREMELY good at her job, the images were better than any I've ever seen. She was an older chinese lady, and didn't talk much, but her english seemed fine when she did speak.

I later found out she was a physician in china for a few decades. When she moved over here, apparently echo tech was the best job she could find.

Food for thought, licensure in this country is hard to get through foreign schools.
 

leftmid

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This is grossly inaccurate, actually, quite the opposite is true. Medical schools will be closing in the Philippines in the next couple of years. At one point, classes were full in PI, but now, seats go unfilled at some schools (even with the increased interest from students abroad). The Philippines is in a big crisis, where no Filipinos are really interested in medicine. It's quicker and easier to get a visa to come to the US as a nurse, and the money is very good. $50,000 + USD is an unheard of salary to someone from the Philippines.

I made the inaccurate assumption out of an anecdote that foreigners don't have much problem matriculating at many medical schools in the Philippines. One of the graduates (my fellow countryman) is practicing medicine where I am in the USA now. Also, I've met nurse assistant, phlebotomist and technician who are Filipino. They stated that they either graduated or dropped out medical from medical school in Philippines. Now I know that it's the lack of qualified apllicants. Thanks.

Matt: To my understanding, most of the FMG don't practice medicine in the USA only because they couldn't pass the examination hence can't enter the needed one year of the residency training before they can get the license.

Unless the OP suddenly becomes interested in the hidden treasure in the Phillipines, may be someone could hijack this thread to some other country for a change.
 

Omyss

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isn't Uof Hong kong itnernationally recognized as a good med school?
 

NonTradMed

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I didn't read the whole thread and this probably doesn't even apply to the OP's situation, but it may be relevant to people considering going to med school in china...

The other day I was at the cardiologist and was having my annual echo. the echo tech was EXTREMELY good at her job, the images were better than any I've ever seen. She was an older chinese lady, and didn't talk much, but her english seemed fine when she did speak.

I later found out she was a physician in china for a few decades. When she moved over here, apparently echo tech was the best job she could find.

Food for thought, licensure in this country is hard to get through foreign schools.

For US med students going to Caribbean medical schools, it is not hard to get licensed. It's the foreign doctors who have language barriers who may find it hard to get licensed in this country. Granted, a foreign medical degree will close most nonprimary care positions, but a nonnative grasp of english may prevent licensure (as in your lady's class).
 

Meatwad

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isn't Uof Hong kong itnernationally recognized as a good med school?

Hong Kong University is a very respectable medical university, I believe it's considered one of the best in the world. It's also extremely difficult to get into, not a last-chance place that takes in foreigners. You'd need to be a superstar to get in as a foreigner.
 
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Meatwad

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Unless the OP suddenly becomes interested in the hidden treasure in the Phillipines, may be someone could hijack this thread to some other country for a change.

The Philippines will give you an excellent education at a ridiculously low price (a couple of grand a year at most). However, they will not teach you in a fashion that will prepare you for the USMLE (no shelf exams, etc.). Also, you will have a problem getting licensed in some US states unless you do the 5th Pathway or complete an intern year in the Philippines. So, the Caribbean is really a better option for one wishing to practice in the US (not the OPs situation, so this is a bit off-topic). In the PI, you do rotations there, and an intern year; so you are stuck there for 5 years.

However, I do believe Filipino schools would have a better reputation in the Middle East than a Chinese schools. If the OP has very low stats, they can apply to Our Lady of Fatima medical school in the Philippines. If they have good stats (good GPA + decent MCAT), they can apply to respected Filipino schools (which is most of them, more information to be found in the Asian section of this forum).
 

fungikid

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Hong Kong University's med school is well-respected. Ironically, my sister's friend applied there thinking he wouldn't get into University of Toronto's med school. He got in and is now in his third year. Two of his friends with lower averages than his got into U of T and he kind of regrets applying to HKU (I'm not implying U of T has lower standards, btw. In fact, I go there. I'm just telling what happened as is.)

Anyway, my friends from mainland China say that students with relatively lower scores on the national university entrance exam go to medical school. I don't know how accurate this is, it's just something I heard.
 

NonTradMed

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Anyway, my friends from mainland China say that students with relatively lower scores on the national university entrance exam go to medical school. I don't know how accurate this is, it's just something I heard.

Our family in China agrees with this statement. Hard to believe but in some countries, medicine is not the most prestigious or most difficult program to get into. :D

You still need to score 'well' to get into medical school in China (because they are all located in respectable four year schools), there are other majors which are more competitive.
 

artaxerxes

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Our family in China agrees with this statement. Hard to believe but in some countries, medicine is not the most prestigious or most difficult program to get into. :D

You still need to score 'well' to get into medical school in China (because they are all located in respectable four year schools), there are other majors which are more competitive.

Probably cause chinese doctor's pay isn't all that great. Going into business will lead to much more money.
 

ScootDoc

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Here is a thought for the OP. If you are a U.S./Canadian born and raised citizen and want to get your MD and practice in a competitive or even a semi-competitive specialty for that matter, maybe you should try gettin your medical education .....umm I don't know...here in the U.S. or Canada

*sense the sarcasm OP*
 

etf

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a lot of people are averse to having "made in china" sewn on their t-shirts - why would you want it on your medical degree?
 

artaxerxes

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a lot of people are averse to having "made in china" sewn on their t-shirts - why would you want it on your medical degree?

yellow fever? but I guess you gotta be pretty desperate for that as most asian med students exclusively date white guys anyways.
 

leftmid

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I believe that most (if not all) of the T-shirt factories in the USA and Canada have gone out of business long time ago. Most (if not all) of brand name T shirt, Polo, sportswear and shoes are imported from Asian countries now. People can buy T-shirts or Polo-shirts by dozen when they visit those countries. All qualities of fabric are available up to the most expensive one in the North America. You can buy dresses by a dozen too.

May be the OP can enlighten people a little bit why he wants to go to medical school in China before the practice in the Middle East. Why not a Caribbean or European school? Do you plan to work for a big oil company or open a private practice there? Don't tell me that you're going to work for Bin though. He doesn't even need Dr. Kevorkian.
 

leftmid

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1) I heard that medicine was an unpopular profession for intelligent people in the USSR too. Few and fewer of them wanted to be a doctor then. I don't know if that is still the problem now. The situation is similar to what other posters have described medicine in China. I can't help wondering why.

2) And does anybody know the difference between social medicine and "commie" medicine or whatever it might be called?

BTW, I think the OP should strongly consider the Uniformed Health Services School of Medicine in the USA. Don't forget to bold face and oversize it that you volunteer for the deployment to the Middle East. I bet it is much cheaper than going to medical school in China. Good luck. Say hello to Bin for me, would you?
 

artaxerxes

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1) I heard that medicine was an unpopular profession for intelligent people in the USSR too. Few and fewer of them wanted to be a doctor then. I don't know if that is still the problem now. The situation is similar to what other posters have described medicine in China. I can't help wondering why.

2) And does anybody know the difference between social medicine and "commie" medicine or whatever it might be called?

BTW, I think the OP should strongly consider the Uniformed Health Services School of Medicine in the USA. Don't forget to bold face and oversize it that you volunteer for the deployment to the Middle East. I bet it is much cheaper than going to medical school in China. Good luck. Say hello to Bin for me, would you?

frankly American medicine is far more socialist than China's ain't no medicare, medicaid, or S&S in china. Compared to America, its wildcat capitalism with an authoritarian bent
 

xylem29

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Yes, I think you should do this.

I'm sure that, as a non-citizen who spent years in a Communist nation, studying "medicine" at a non-US accredited institution that is half as long as American programs, you will be in great demand.

:laugh:

And you're not very well read on Chinese politics. A centralized socioeconomic system...LMAO...anything but.
 

dazlindz

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i'd just like to echo the "don't do it" sentiment on the boards. i too know someone who is a brilliant doctor, but because she got her md in china she had to take the boards here and had a lot of trouble with finding a residency and job. we don't like foreign md's here too much, apparently.

and if you want to work in the middle east, why not get an md there? (not that i know anything about it)
 

jochi1543

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1) I heard that medicine was an unpopular profession for intelligent people in the USSR too. Few and fewer of them wanted to be a doctor then. I don't know if that is still the problem now.
Sorry, that's not true. It always was and still is (despite the ridiculously low salaries!) extremely competitive.
 

leftmid

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Sorry, that's not true. It always was and still is (despite the ridiculously low salaries!) extremely competitive.

Thanks. I made a false assumption out of the vent (in an article) by some doctors in the USSR. They were unhappy with low salary and the lack of recognition comparing to other professions such as Ballet dancers, athletes, scientists etc. People treated them as if they needed medicine to survive. I don't know if most of their colleagues actually shared the same feeling though.
 
B

Blade28

To the OP - your goal is to obtain your MD from China, then proceed where for residency?

China? Canada? The US?
 

Meatwad

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i'd just like to echo the "don't do it" sentiment on the boards. i too know someone who is a brilliant doctor, but because she got her md in china she had to take the boards here and had a lot of trouble with finding a residency and job. we don't like foreign md's here too much, apparently.

and if you want to work in the middle east, why not get an md there? (not that i know anything about it)

Quite the contrary. According to NRMP data, in 2007, 25% of residency spots went to non-citizen foreign medical graduates. We don't, however, give residency spots to non-citizen FMG's with poor Step 1 grades and a lack of English skills. If anything, America is overly accepting of foreign MD's. But that's another argument altogether.
 

bubbachuck

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Yes, I think you should do this.

I'm sure that, as a non-citizen who spent years in a Communist nation, studying "medicine" at a non-US accredited institution that is half as long as American programs, you will be in great demand.

:laugh:

you don't sound like a douchebag at all
 

pharmy614

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wow...80 people responded? the interent is great....

Anyhoo, to answer some of your questions...I am just using my sibling's pre-pharm SDN account which I already stated...don't really see how that's an issue...some of you have too much time on your hands..i..f you want to talk about other things why not start your own threads??.....

And I want to work in the middle east b/c they respect foreign trained doctors (would get my residency in Canada after doing med school in Europe or China...its possible I know 4 people who've gone this route) and pay them great salaries. Thanks for your responses.
 

stillapplying

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China is not a pleasant country to live in - not even in the modern cities like Shanghai and Beijing.


There are a heck of a lot of foreigners from NA and Eur living here who would strongly disagree with that statement. Why try to speak for everyone when it is a very evident fact that not everyone agrees with you (evident if you have actually been here and talked to foreigners)?
 

willcandude

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in the midst of the medicine in china talk, there's also so much unrelated anti-china sediments here and there.... that's just sad to hear

i find the OP's grand plans - md in china in 2 years > find job in middle east with 200k (probably saudi arabia) to be quite absurd... i hear some UK grads go practice in middle east because of this high salary... if it comes to comparing a UK med vs a China med, i think China med will be at a disadvantage..

now, i'm not dissing china's med school. the students are probably very intelligent... but there's the stigma, though may not be legitmiate, u still have to deal with it.....

and how are u gonna do clinicals if u don't know mandarin (even if the course is in english)? do you think they will find some english-speaking patients for u in china?

as for the poor social etiqueette in china like spitting in public, i blame it on the communist government. majority of china's population is under-(or un- ?)-educated. also, with so much coruption in china and the government doing little to correct it, the recent generations begin to see that being nice and honest isn't gonnna get them anywhere.... china has the worst parts of communism and capitalism (rich getting richer, poor getting poorer)

now back to medicine...... DON'T GO TO CHINA TO DO MD. people in china take pride in leaving the country for education, y would u wanna go IN? or u can wait for another 10years, maybe chiense universities will be more accepted world wide

*p.s. these don't apply to universities in hong kong
 

Cuijie Wei

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If you know little about China and you are ignorant ,please don't say anything like that.
I don't think I want to study somewhere that requires me to worry about things that you'd never worry about here, like clean water .
If you have been to China, you will be surprise about the development of China
 

giantaxon

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If you know little about China and you are ignorant ,please don't say anything like that.
If you have been to China, you will be surprise about the development of China


Ok... I know China as I did extensive research on the country when I was with the UN. Sure China isn't as bad as it was when Mao was around, but that bar was pretty low to begin with...

You leave out an important detail... China is still "developING". It has a long long way to go to reaching western standards. Then you have to consider the fact that it is a super oppressive country. I could draw up a list pages long of the atrocities its government has committed within the last few decades...

The moral of the story is to avoid China if you can. There are simply more stable more internationally well respected nations to get an overseas education at...
 

Dr.Millisevert

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i know someone who got her m.d. in china. she now works in a biotech because it was too hard to practice here. enough said.

I'm sure it would be very difficult. Just be sure to clearify "why" it is difficult. It may have had more to do with her English skills than her medical skills. (You try sitting medical examinations in mandarine chinese and see if you run into any problems) It may have been because she didn't do well on her interviews, maybe she pissed off the wrong people, maybe she had personal problems. Who knows.

Bottom line. Yes it would be very difficult to accomplish this China MD -> US practice. However, not impossible.
 

Dr.Millisevert

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Does anyone know someone who got MD from China and now working in the Middle East, another country or even China herself? Do patients still respect doctors a lot in China? In other words, do patients sue their doctors in China? I've heard that it's happening in other Asian countries now.


If you want to create a list of countries in which you judge how well respected doctors are by the frequency of getting sued, then the US would be at the top of the list.
 

thumz

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IAM in china ZHEJIANG MEDICAL UNIVERSITY..

everything is fine here, and am not Chinese am from east Africa, we have some local prof`s and international prof`s,
it is true that some uni`s they are not experienced in teaching in english, be carefully there sre so many fake uni`s in china..
last i might tell u go only to TOP UNi`s according to chinese ranking
sooryenglish is not my language bt i hope u understand me
try PEKING UNIVERSITY
ZHEJIANG UNIVERSITY
thy are TOP unis in china
Hello all,

Your responses are much appreciated but there seems to be some confusion about my situation (I thought I made it clear before but eh..I'll try again).

I am a Canadian student who's just graduated from the University of Toronto Honors BSc. program. I only speak english seeing as I'm caucasian (Scottish/Portugese) so I don't speak Mandarin. However, the med schools in China that I wanted to apply to are for foreign students only (ie. International students) so its English instruction only... and it would not be for 5 years since I've already completed most of their material in my BSc, it would be like 2-3 years tops at $3000-$4000US/year. So...my question was if I attended this Chinese school and obtained an M.D. would it be hard to get good positions in the future not only in the west (Europe or Canada )but in the Middleast as well? And I'm interested in the middleast (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Kuwait). b/c they pay like $200,000/year starting salaries:eek:.....Glad to have cleared that up, and thanks for your advice guys!!!
 

dosimetry

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Yes, I think you should do this.

I'm sure that, as a non-citizen who spent years in a Communist nation, studying "medicine" at a non-US accredited institution that is half as long as American programs, you will be in great demand.

:laugh:


For one thing, getting into ANY universities in China (as a Chinese of course) would be harder than getting into a med school in the US.

PS: Chinese MBBS are recognized by the WHO, Canada, & the US (I don't know about the other countries though). The education is 5 years long + residency, so I'm really quite confused about the "half as long" part that you're talking about. Is it because you're can't do math? Well I think that's the problem my friend.
 

dosimetry

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I know for a fact that degrees (or more specifically courses) from China aren't accepted here in the US.


Chinese educated physicians, engineers, pharmacists, nurses, & other degrees are all recognized both in Canada & the US. However in order to register in the profession you must pass the registry exam (same as those from other Western countries). In my hospital we've got quite a few Chinese educated MDs, radiation therapists, & dosimetrists working.
 

dosimetry

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Hey fellow Canadian...

Your future plans seem COMPLETELY from left field. Why exactly do you want to study medicine in China? Furthermore, have you ever set foot in Asia? China?

I'm probably going to be flamed for this, but China is hardly an ideal environment for study. The last time I was in Shanghai or Beijing, I couldn't wait to get the hell out. Insanely hectic, pollution worse than anything you can imagine, a national love for the disgusting practice of public spitting, CROWDED CROWDED CROWDED...man, the list goes on. Oh, and since you don't know Mandarin, you might as well be mute because NO ONE speaks English in China.

In conclusion, China is a messed up country where almost ANYTHING GOES. I'd rather go to school in Thailand!


Um, it bothers you because no one speaks English? Wow the next time when a French goes to Australia he might as well say "Australia sucks balls cuz no one here speak French".
 

dosimetry

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To pharmy,

I don't think going to Chinese meds is a good idea, reasons are pretty much all listed above. It'll be really hard for you to come back & practice. You can probably practice in some other East Asian countries though. I know a Korean friend who went to a really good pharm school in Northern China, & he's going back to practice pharm in S.Korea afterward.
 

dosimetry

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Not sure if you're seriously asking but I'll answer. YES, doctors hold alot of social status in China, probably equivalent to how we see people with MDs in the US but no where NEAR the economic status.

Law suits, they're rare but growing, that's very much true. Insurance companies are still budding in China so getting insurance as a doctor or as a patient is still not that universal. IE, if you screw up surgery in China, it is more likely the patients family shows up at your doctor wanting to beat the crap out of you than being served.

I do not know the exact details of the content but it drops alot of the chemistry/physics aspects of medicine, biochemistry is still taught to some degree.

On a side note, to no one specific, it seems quite a few people should read Benedict Anderson or Edward Said's works (not wiki).

I just want to say something about your understanding of physician's status in China. You see China is very different, people want to be in management positions or do stuff that's directly related to money, such as finance. Finance, MBA, actuary in China are HOT HOT HOT. There're tons of these jobs in China that are offering a similar amount of compensation compare to the States. Doctors on the other hand are generally being viewed as OK jobs, they are much lesser respected compare to the MDs in US. If you tell somebody "Hi, I'm a doctor", most likely that person is going to say "OK", but if you tell that person you're an MBA & is currently a director/manager of a department in a bank or investment firm or something related to the stock market etc, they're going to say "WOW".

Salary wise, docs can make very little or a hell amount of money in China. Young docs make very little but the experienced specialists can make way more, especially the surgeons. In cities like Shanghai or Beijing, it's common for a specialist surgeon to make over a million ¥ (or about 150k USD) if you count in the commission from drugs/equipments, red pockets, & bonus (in China it's common for employees to get bonus that's several times the amount of their monthly or yearly income, even for labor jobs). My friend's dad's friend was a surgeon graduated from a Japanese med school. He's one of the staffed surgeon at Beijing XieHe Hospital, & he makes about 150k USD for base salary alone, if you count in all the commissions, red pockets, & bonus, he would probably make more than 300k a year. However most docs make wayyy less though, in fact in many places the base salary for physicians are about the same or even lower than high school teachers (well teachers are being viewed as respected jobs in China & they make way more RELATIVELY compare to the teachers in other countries).
 
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Shoushu

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Chinese educated physicians, engineers, pharmacists, nurses, & other degrees are all recognized both in Canada & the US. However in order to register in the profession you must pass the registry exam (same as those from other Western countries). In my hospital we've got quite a few Chinese educated MDs, radiation therapists, & dosimetrists working.

The Chinese MBBS/MDs love to come to America. No surprise. USA treats doctors better than in China.

In 50 states alone, there are at least Total: 5226 (5226) Chinese-educated docs. All these IMGs tested and interviewed into doctor jobs in the U.S. (http://physician.cmgforum.net/) The website I listed only includes random searched ones. I estimate there are at least 7,000. Isn't it enough stat to show this as a viable way back to West?

CA approves ~130 Chinese med schools. see Cali list. Out of dozens, only Big 4 in caribbean are approved. Means 130 of them are quality-enough to be ~50 states approved. China has 174 WHO/IMED-FAIMER schools. If one wants CA or a hard state, don't go to other 44.

Top 20 Chinese schools are prestigious. If you study hard, you can pass USMLE, MCCQE, PLAB, NMAT, NZMLE, AUS-MLE.

I'd study there any day than in Philipines or tiny caribbean island.
 
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lmesina

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I recently attended a premed fair at my university. There were representatives from CMU there. I have a friend that is about to attend there also, and I was somewhat interested in their program. However, I do not speak any Chinese.
I brought up my concerns about this, and they told me that I would be okay, and I will not need to, since they taught in English. But we just spoke briefly, since I wanted to check out the other tables.

From other sources, I've gathered that I should be able to speak the language, since I'll be interacting with patients there during rotations/clerkships right?
 

Shoushu

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From other sources, I've gathered that I should be able to speak the language, since I'll be interacting with patients there during rotations/clerkships right?

CMU is a good choice. Prestigious univ.

For English MBBS programs, no need to know any Chinese in the 1st 4 years or so. Basic sciences are taught in English by Chinese or internationally-hired doctors.

You may need to speak semi-fluent mandarin to interact with patients. 4 or 5 years is enough to learn a language
 

lihangchen

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Hi guys...

I'm a Canadian student who's considering attending a Chinese med school for foreign/international students that'll be 2-3 yrs long and very inexpensive. But I was wondering: if I do get my M.D. from China will it be hard to find high-paying positions in the West and especially the Middleast (where I want to work)? This is b/c I've heard that the Middleastern hospitals/institutions prefer Western educated doctors (i.e. western med schools). Anyone have any thoughts or experiences on this?

Hi, you already have MBBS?
Then apply graduate level Master or Doctor med education in China. Cheap and cost 3 years, you can do like 3 years clinical training, some schools are very good.
Chinese is a must in clinical training though.

Fudan University, I am studying in it.
Shanghai Jiaotong U, in Shanghai
Beijing U
PUMC, in Beijing
Huaxi Medical College, in Chengdu
Tongji Medical College, in Wuhan
Zhongshan Medical College, in Guangzhou

I can not say much about the efficacy of Master or Doctors degree in China to western countries. But they are necessary in China.
 

maxhmu

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Hi guys...

I'm a Canadian student who's considering attending a Chinese med school for foreign/international students that'll be 2-3 yrs long and very inexpensive. But I was wondering: if I do get my M.D. from China will it be hard to find high-paying positions in the West and especially the Middleast (where I want to work)? This is b/c I've heard that the Middleastern hospitals/institutions prefer Western educated doctors (i.e. western med schools). Anyone have any thoughts or experiences on this?

hi ,now i'm doing my M.D. from china there have no any problem and its also cheap from any other countries , here hospital management is better and if u want take admission in any good university then u can send email - [email protected] then i'll send u all details about my university and others , now i,m studying in peking university in beijing , p.r china.
 
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