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Manual Therapy

Discussion in 'Physical Therapy' started by mjb2006, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. mjb2006

    mjb2006 New Member

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    May 6, 2006
    First year DPT student here, wondering if anyone has an opinion on what school of thought is the best for manual therapy (Maitland, Paris etc.). Also, does salary increase for someone who has a certification in manual therapy (MTC, DMT). I am partial to Paris because he is a pioneer in orthopedic PT and because of his viewpiont on PTs specializing in something rather than a broad knowledge. Thoughts??
     
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  3. matotom

    matotom Junior Member 5+ Year Member

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    Apr 26, 2004
    i took one paris course and thought he was A TOTAL HACK. Damn good 'salesman' tho. the best chiropractor has nothing on him.

    just my opinion. some peeps love his methods.
     
  4. PT2MD

    PT2MD Hold my beer... 2+ Year Member

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    Aug 3, 2006
    Lone Star State
    Lots of opinions and take mine for what it's worth. Paris has a REEAL high opinion of his methods which I'm not crazy about, but the courses are taught well. Ola Grimbsby has a good series that's pretty evidence based.

    I've been practicing for long enough to come to the realization that most manual therapy courses are often flowery versions of what you already know. It doesn't hurt to go to them, but don't expect an entirely new skill set unless you really feel behind the 8-ball. Manual therapy hacks, as the OP put it, are part of the reason I think PT has some real identity issues.
     
  5. truthseeker

    truthseeker Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Sep 2, 2004
    the only CEUs that I have taken regarding manual therapy has been a Mulligan course. It was a new set of skills that actually helped my practice quite a bit. Specifically, treating torticollis/wryneck. Used to take weeks, now takes hours/days.
     
  6. PT2MD

    PT2MD Hold my beer... 2+ Year Member

    1,084
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    Aug 3, 2006
    Lone Star State
    If I took a course teaching how to manage torticollis/wryneck, it would be new to me as well. Of course if I took a manual course on conditions I actually treat, I wouldn't expect a new skill set. Manual therapists have to sell themselves and their approaches to put butts in the seats of their courses.
     
  7. truthseeker

    truthseeker Senior Member 10+ Year Member

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    Sep 2, 2004

    I didn't mean to imply that that is all I learned in the course, but most courses give you one or two nuggets that are gold, and lots of fluff otherwise. Very few are paradigm shifting.

    The nugget in the mulligan course was treating those people, including myself, who occasionally wake up with severely limited range of motion in one direction with pain at that end point.

    Seems that I would always wake up with that 1 or 2 days before a long anticipated golf trip.
     

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