carrigallen

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Here is the .pdf file from the NRMP website, of areas filled today. Posted on NRMP site 1 hour ago.

Notes:

Remember that specific advanced specialties in the US (PGY-2s) (Neurology, Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, Otolaryngology, & Urology) are filled by early match (sf) and NOT included here. Any programs listed are those leftover from san fran, or choose to wait.

Remember to decipher the ones which are PGY-1 and PGY-2. Some are integrated programs, some are not!

You need to read the columns carefully, and understand how the field/pgy are organized before you can interpret the data.
 

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CaptainJack02

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Someone explain something to me.

There was only 1 spot in nuclear medicine and 4 in opthalmology? Am I reading this incorrectly, or is this data the match statistics for all students in 2004? And NO plastic surgery spots AT ALL?!?! I'm not interested in any of these fields, but those #'s sound wierd.

Captjack
 

rice

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Ophthalmology is done through the early match (SF Match). That is why you don't see the numbers there for the NRMP.
 

(nicedream)

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I have a question. There were about a thousand transitional year positions offered, and 13,000 ranks for them. That makes it almost the highest ranks/pos residency, I believe below only Diag. Rad. However, not all the spots were filled, and transitional year is hardly a competetive spot to get. What's the deal?
 

beezar

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Originally posted by (nicedream)
I have a question. There were about a thousand transitional year positions offered, and 13,000 ranks for them. That makes it almost the highest ranks/pos residency, I believe below only Diag. Rad. However, not all the spots were filled, and transitional year is hardly a competetive spot to get. What's the deal?
On the contrary, transitional spots can be extremely competitive, especially the ones in desirable locations like California. The reasons for this is that several specialties require a prelim or transitional year before residency (such as Derm, Optho, Rads, Anesthesia, PM&R). Transitional years are also thought to be easier years than prelim medicine or prelim surgery, so are highly sought after, especially the cush ones. Now if you take into account how competitive those derm, optho, and rads applicants are, it could be very tough to get a transitional spot.
 

IndyXRT

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As a person who had to scramble for a first year position, I can confirm that transitional year programs are very competitive.
 

(nicedream)

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I stand corrected. I guess I'm thinking in terms of osteopathic postgraduate study, where a transitional/intern year is required in states such as Florida regardless of specialty. I assume that such spots are easy to land? Still, I was under the impression that allopathic students completed a one year internship preceding their residency regardless of specialty as well. Is this different from a transitional year?
 

Skrubz

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The transitional year is basically your M3 year all over again (depending on the particular program). All PGY-1 MDs are usually called "interns" but are already doing what their residency entails (be it general surgery, internal medicine, peds, ER, etc), except for those residencies that require a year of post-grad clinical training prior to specialty training.

E.g. Categorical medicine intern (PGY-1) will only have 2 more years of medicine before graduating (3 year residency).
 

(nicedream)

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Originally posted by Apollyon
More like your M4 year - 4 required months, a month of vacation, and 7 months of electives is pretty cush/sweet.
So what's the notoriously hellish "intern" year?
 

IndyXRT

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Originally posted by (nicedream)
So what's the notoriously hellish "intern" year?
Back in the day, all allopathic residencies required a rotating internship prior to applying for any residency. This is no longer the case. However, the first year of residency training, no matter what you do, is still called the internship.

As previously stated, some specialties have the intern year built in (surgery, IM, OB, peds, FP), but some require a year of internship in a separate specialty before you begin training (Rad Onc, Radiology, Opthalmology, Anesthesia to name a few). The natoriously hellish "intern" year you refer to is what most people have to go through their first year. The first year of residency (aka internship) usually involves much more call and involves being in the hospital for more hours than the rest of residency training. However, many transitional year spots are not that difficult (less call, more easy months). Thus they are highly sought after, especially by lazy people like me. :)
 

edik

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Originally posted by rice
Ophthalmology is done through the early match (SF Match). That is why you don't see the numbers there for the NRMP.
I thought early match was for many specialties (Urology, Ortho, ENT, etc), but they do show up in the list.