MisterTO

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Aug 4, 2017
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Hi all,

I scored a 508 (130/124/127/127) on the MCAT in June 2020. I got 1 II from last cycle that ended in a R (school had a 38% post II acceptance). Personally, I know that my MCAT is meh (statistically). In no way am I trying to be a dick to anyone below a 508, it just is truthfully lower than the MD matriculants; scores. The II was an in-state school, so I guess I made the initial "stats cut" for an II, but I did lack clinical experience. Approximately 2 or 3/2020 I was going into a hospital for clinical volunteering. It was canceled due to COVID. However, I got back in 3/21 and have been there since, and plan doing it on a weekly basis for the forseeable future. I have learned a lot from it. Anyways, this is an MCAT post.

I want to retake. I graduate this semester. Classes end about mid-May. I was looking at dates and was thinking the 7/30 exam might be good; would give me 2.5 months (and any time before mid-may to do something between classes). Scores come out 8/31. What I want to ask is do you think that is abnormally late? I do qualify for FAP, so 20 schools are free, applying is free of charge. I feel that by time a potential interview came, I would have improved in the volunteering department (which was my biggest lack) and clinical exp. I have pretty good leadership/tutoring/mentoring stuff already that I was involved with most of my college career, which I enjoyed thoroughly and made it difficult to take on much more. I think I would apply, submit Primary, hopefully get secondaries, write them that month (august) while my exam is being scored. Some I have already written, thus I would tweek for the schools I applied to last year. Have my secondaries in ASAP and then once my scores are in, my app is complete at the schools on 8/31 or 9/1, ready for review. Sorry I was so long-winded. Just trying to get my plan in. As well as any tips, particularly CARS. My average scores on my FLs were (129/124/128/128) for a 509. I guess I cannot be too surprised from the 508, although my recents in B/B and P/S were like 129+ so I was just hoping I'd keep that upward trend in my exam.

THANKS IF YOU MADE IT THIS FAR.
 

GreenDuck12

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The lack of clinical experience was likely a greater impediment to your application than the MCAT score. It is not very likely that a few months of volunteering will significantly move the needle. I would look seriously at a gap year. My state program straight up told us during interviews if you are rejected do not reapply next cycle- take time to build a stronger portfolio.

That being said, if your practice average pretest was a 509 with a sub 125 in cars, you should not have taken the MCAT when you did as a sub 125 score is problematic. For your retake to really have an impact you’re going to need or 5+ point improvement. CARS is definitely the hardest section to improve so you’ll need to practice every day. Look into jack westin free cars passages and practice reading / annotation strategies.
 
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MisterTO

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The lack of clinical experience was likely a greater impediment to your application than the MCAT score. It is not very likely that a few months of volunteering will significantly move the needle. I would look seriously at a gap year. My state program straight up told us during interviews if you are rejected do not reapply next cycle- take time to build a stronger portfolio.

That being said, if your practice average pretest was a 509 with a sub 125 in cars, you should not have taken the MCAT when you did as a sub 125 score is problematic. For your retake to really have an impact you’re going to need or 5+ point improvement. CARS is definitely the hardest section to improve so you’ll need to practice every day. Look into jack westin free cars passages and practice reading / annotation strategies.
Thanks. I respect your opinion. I do have parental pressure as they are not thrilled to house me for another year after college 😂 I think that my retake could be improved much more I'm the science sections. As far as cars I have gotten the highest of a 126. I just freak out and overthink in it. I've been doing daily JW cars and content questions. Might up that a bit more with maybe reading a chapter if content review a day or mixing in Anki until mid may when I can study much more. By time my application is complete, I'll have +200 volunteer hours in a clinical setting. I didn't think my application otherwise Wal terrible, just kinda had to let covid hold me back for a bit.
 

GreenDuck12

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Thanks. I respect your opinion. I do have parental pressure as they are not thrilled to house me for another year after college 😂 I think that my retake could be improved much more I'm the science sections. As far as cars I have gotten the highest of a 126. I just freak out and overthink in it. I've been doing daily JW cars and content questions. Might up that a bit more with maybe reading a chapter if content review a day or mixing in Anki until mid may when I can study much more. By time my application is complete, I'll have +200 volunteer hours in a clinical setting. I didn't think my application otherwise Wal terrible, just kinda had to let covid hold me back for a bit.
Yeah I get that. It’s a bit challenging to go from post II R to an A next cycle and everyone’s best chance for an A is from their state school. You made it to the interview phase so your MCAT score isn’t what held you back but could be a factor. A 130 in cp and 127 in bb is strong already. A sub 125 section score may trigger autoscreens so I would definitely focus your time and energy on that section. It may help you with programs that didn’t interview you this round.
 
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KnightDoc

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Anyways, this is an MCAT post.

I want to retake. I graduate this semester. Classes end about mid-May. I was looking at dates and was thinking the 7/30 exam might be good; would give me 2.5 months (and any time before mid-may to do something between classes). Scores come out 8/31. What I want to ask is do you think that is abnormally late? I do qualify for FAP, so 20 schools are free, applying is free of charge. I feel that by time a potential interview came, I would have improved in the volunteering department (which was my biggest lack) and clinical exp. I have pretty good leadership/tutoring/mentoring stuff already that I was involved with most of my college career, which I enjoyed thoroughly and made it difficult to take on much more. I think I would apply, submit Primary, hopefully get secondaries, write them that month (august) while my exam is being scored. Some I have already written, thus I would tweek for the schools I applied to last year. Have my secondaries in ASAP and then once my scores are in, my app is complete at the schools on 8/31 or 9/1, ready for review. Sorry I was so long-winded. Just trying to get my plan in. As well as any tips, particularly CARS. My average scores on my FLs were (129/124/128/128) for a 509. I guess I cannot be too surprised from the 508, although my recents in B/B and P/S were like 129+ so I was just hoping I'd keep that upward trend in my exam.

THANKS IF YOU MADE IT THIS FAR.
Is it an MCAT post, or a reapplication post? I hear what you're saying about your parents wanting you out of the house, but you should check out some of @gonnif's posts about reapplying immediately after a failed cycle. You are being very overly optimistic. Your secondaries will be trickling in throughout the month of September, and you will NOT be complete at many schools on 8/31 or 9/1 if you are not submitting primaries until 8/31.

No, being complete is September is not "abnormally late," but it's also not early, and you are a reapplicant with a sub par MCAT that will be averaged by many adcoms with whatever you get on the retake. I don't have a good answer as to your timing, because I understand the pressure to move forward, but you might benefit from more than 2.5 months of MCAT prep, you'd be FAR better off submitting your primaries in May instead of September, and a lot of schools like seeing a break between application cycles. Good luck!!!
 

gonnif

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Hi all,

I scored a 508 (130/124/127/127) on the MCAT in June 2020. I got 1 II from last cycle that ended in a R (school had a 38% post II acceptance). Personally, I know that my MCAT is meh (statistically). In no way am I trying to be a dick to anyone below a 508, it just is truthfully lower than the MD matriculants; scores. The II was an in-state school, so I guess I made the initial "stats cut" for an II, but I did lack clinical experience. Approximately 2 or 3/2020 I was going into a hospital for clinical volunteering. It was canceled due to COVID. However, I got back in 3/21 and have been there since, and plan doing it on a weekly basis for the forseeable future. I have learned a lot from it. Anyways, this is an MCAT post.

I want to retake. I graduate this semester. Classes end about mid-May. I was looking at dates and was thinking the 7/30 exam might be good; would give me 2.5 months (and any time before mid-may to do something between classes). Scores come out 8/31. What I want to ask is do you think that is abnormally late? I do qualify for FAP, so 20 schools are free, applying is free of charge. I feel that by time a potential interview came, I would have improved in the volunteering department (which was my biggest lack) and clinical exp. I have pretty good leadership/tutoring/mentoring stuff already that I was involved with most of my college career, which I enjoyed thoroughly and made it difficult to take on much more. I think I would apply, submit Primary, hopefully get secondaries, write them that month (august) while my exam is being scored. Some I have already written, thus I would tweek for the schools I applied to last year. Have my secondaries in ASAP and then once my scores are in, my app is complete at the schools on 8/31 or 9/1, ready for review. Sorry I was so long-winded. Just trying to get my plan in. As well as any tips, particularly CARS. My average scores on my FLs were (129/124/128/128) for a 509. I guess I cannot be too surprised from the 508, although my recents in B/B and P/S were like 129+ so I was just hoping I'd keep that upward trend in my exam.

THANKS IF YOU MADE IT THIS FAR.
As @KnightDoc mentioned me I will add one or two thoughts

You are nuts if you think your are ready to reapply this term and mostly it is your gung-ho attitude. I suggest you get your head out of wherever it is stuck and listen up otherwise you will be likely rejected again

1) you are assuming that your only flaw was your MCAT and limited clinical.
2) you are planning to take the MCAT 7/30 with scores coming back when 8/30. So schools will either wait until the new score comes out which means are at the bottom of the pile late in the game. Or they will consider you with your preexisting score, which means you havent gained much in your application.
3) Are you going to re-polishing your AMCAS (which only got you a single II from your state school) and trying to do secondaries again all while re-prepping for the MCAT. Sounds like a major overload and overly optimistic to say the least
4) As I tell people time and time again, the medical schools themselves say the most common mistake is reapplying too soon.
**********

Medical Schools Reapplicant Links (Post # infinity+1)

Many medical schools offer specific pages of advice for reapplicants, something I find few students look into. This would be true whether or not you are a specific reapplicant to that school. Below are links to a few and please note most say the most common mistake among reapplicants is applying again too soon

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Reapplicants - Miller School of Medicine Admissions
Roughly 20% of the students who apply to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in any given year are reapplicants. Data that we have collected indicate they have a lower acceptance rate than do first time applicants

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Heath
http://www.med.wisc.edu/education/md/admissions/reapplying/31716
(emphasis in the original)
There should be significant improvements in your application before reapplying. This might mean not reapplying the very next year. The most common error made by reapplicants is that they submit their next application too soon.

The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Interview Tips | Ohio State College of Medicine
To maximize the chances of giving off this perception, you must allow enough time before reapplying. This will undoubtedly be the hardest part of the process, but be patient; if you rush it, you may join the ranks of those who are applying for a third time.

University of Minnesota Medical School
Re-Applicant
Though you can submit a second application immediately after your first application, you may want to consider waiting a year if you feel you need more experiences that help you demonstrate the essential and desired qualities of an ideal medical student.

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Reapplicants | Office of Admissions
Our Ideal Candidate | Office of Admissions

Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
http://medicine.vtc.vt.edu/admissions/re-applicants/

LSU Health Shreveport
http://www.lsuhscshreveport.edu/Education/som/admissions/reapplicants/index

University of Missouri
http://medicine.missouri.edu/admissions/nontraditional.html

East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine
https://www.ecu.edu/cs-dhs/bsomadmissions/whatif.cfm

Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC)
https://www.unthsc.edu/texas-colleg...ants-home/common-mistakes-made-by-applicants/

Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
http://www.com.msu.edu/Admissions/Guidelines_For_Success/Reapplication.htm
 
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MisterTO

2+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2017
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As @KnightDoc mentioned me I will add one or two thoughts

You are nuts if you think your are ready to reapply this term and mostly it is your gung-ho attitude. I suggest you get your head out of wherever it is stuck and listen up otherwise you will be likely rejected again

1) you are assuming that your only flaw was your MCAT and limited clinical.
2) you are planning to take the MCAT 7/30 with scores coming back when 8/30. So schools will either wait until the new score comes out which means are at the bottom of the pile late in the game. Or they will consider you with your preexisting score, which means you havent gained much in your application.
3) Are you going to re-polishing your AMCAS (which only got you a single II from your state school) and trying to do secondaries again all while re-prepping for the MCAT. Sounds like a major overload and overly optimistic to say the least
4) As I tell people time and time again, the medical schools themselves say the most common mistake is reapplying too soon.
**********

Medical Schools Reapplicant Links (Post # infinity+1)

Many medical schools offer specific pages of advice for reapplicants, something I find few students look into. This would be true whether or not you are a specific reapplicant to that school. Below are links to a few and please note most say the most common mistake among reapplicants is applying again too soon

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine
Reapplicants - Miller School of Medicine Admissions
Roughly 20% of the students who apply to the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in any given year are reapplicants. Data that we have collected indicate they have a lower acceptance rate than do first time applicants

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Heath
http://www.med.wisc.edu/education/md/admissions/reapplying/31716
(emphasis in the original)
There should be significant improvements in your application before reapplying. This might mean not reapplying the very next year. The most common error made by reapplicants is that they submit their next application too soon.

The Ohio State University College of Medicine
Interview Tips | Ohio State College of Medicine
To maximize the chances of giving off this perception, you must allow enough time before reapplying. This will undoubtedly be the hardest part of the process, but be patient; if you rush it, you may join the ranks of those who are applying for a third time.

University of Minnesota Medical School
Re-Applicant
Though you can submit a second application immediately after your first application, you may want to consider waiting a year if you feel you need more experiences that help you demonstrate the essential and desired qualities of an ideal medical student.

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Reapplicants | Office of Admissions
Our Ideal Candidate | Office of Admissions

Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine
http://medicine.vtc.vt.edu/admissions/re-applicants/

LSU Health Shreveport
http://www.lsuhscshreveport.edu/Education/som/admissions/reapplicants/index

University of Missouri
http://medicine.missouri.edu/admissions/nontraditional.html

East Carolina University, Brody School of Medicine
Admissions

Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (UNTHSC)
Common Mistakes Made by Applicants - Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine

Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
http://www.com.msu.edu/Admissions/Guidelines_For_Success/Reapplication.htm

Okay. Here are my stats

508 MCAT (130/124/127/127)
3.98 cGPA
3.99 sGPA
350 hours of being an SI (supplemental instructor for general chemistry)
800 hours as a residential peer mentor (tutor and first year student mentor) with Res Life
Residential advisor this year (not really putting an hours on it as it isn't a typical timed job)
Several hundred hours as a tutor for various subjects and as a note taker for disability access services
President of a Cancer Awareness org; hosted a Relay for Life
200 volunteer hours in various organizations whenever they were offered (I had a rigid schedule while I was the Peer Mentor) so I got them when I could.
400 hours research (which was cut off during COVID-19, not a lot came from it however, no pubs at least)
Hobbies include winemaking and growing grapes, gardening, an extreme interest in football, and a writer and photographer for student Uni newspaper.
Now 200 hours clinical volunteering at a hospital by time my app is complete (nothing wild but patient transport and then other minor activities that I need to do for patients).
Would like to start scribing after my app is finished for my gap year or work in the industry (Biochem) and volunteer more.

I am sorry, but If i get my MCAT up to maybe 514 with something like (130/127/129/128) I would feel much better of my applicant as a white male. I also understand that is a big IF. I know my app looks maybe better for an academic standpoint, maybe for like PhD and teaching or something. I also plan to re-evaluate my personal statement and get at least 1 new LOR. I am not just going in and blindly re-applying. My list was very low yield and lots of privates just because of my situation (lower MCAT), but I just feel meh not applying with free 20 school designations with FAP. Maybe if my practice MCAT scores are not great, than I may reconsider. I am getting older and after my clinical experiences, albeit minor, I want to get out there soon and make a difference. I understand my app is not stellar but god dangit, I want another crack at if @gonnif

thx
 

MisterTO

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Aug 4, 2017
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Is it an MCAT post, or a reapplication post? I hear what you're saying about your parents wanting you out of the house, but you should check out some of @gonnif's posts about reapplying immediately after a failed cycle. You are being very overly optimistic. Your secondaries will be trickling in throughout the month of September, and you will NOT be complete at many schools on 8/31 or 9/1 if you are not submitting primaries until 8/31.

No, being complete is September is not "abnormally late," but it's also not early, and you are a reapplicant with a sub par MCAT that will be averaged by many adcoms with whatever you get on the retake. I don't have a good answer as to your timing, because I understand the pressure to move forward, but you might benefit from more than 2.5 months of MCAT prep, you'd be FAR better off submitting your primaries in May instead of September, and a lot of schools like seeing a break between application cycles. Good luck!!!
I 100% would be submitting my primary on May 31 or whenever it opens. Pre-writing my secondaries during the month of august after my MCAT is complete, and getting all of them in by my MCAT score release or before then.

AND @gonnif sorry if all of what I sent is annoying, I just wanted to give you more context. I understand that I am not an extraordinary applicant, just wanted to give you as much context as possible. Thanks
 
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KnightDoc

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I 100% would be submitting my primary on May 31 or whenever it opens. Pre-writing my secondaries during the month of august after my MCAT is complete, and getting all of them in by my MCAT score release or before then.

AND @gonnif sorry if all of what I sent is annoying, I just wanted to give you more context. I understand that I am not an extraordinary applicant, just wanted to give you as much context as possible. Thanks
Okay, so now you have a new risk, and that's that your score isn't where you need it to be and you risk another blown cycle at those schools. Applying MCAT-blind is risky, and that's exactly what you will be doing with a 508 and a TBD.

You are correct, though, that doing this will mitigate what would otherwise be a late complete date. It's workable if you have enough time to prepare for the test, but you still have to deal with the fact that schools like to see reapplicants take a break. This WOULD totally work for schools you didn't apply to last cycle, assuming you hit your target MCAT. Good luck!!!
 

MisterTO

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Okay, so now you have a new risk, and that's that your score isn't where you need it to be and you risk another blown cycle at those schools. Applying MCAT-blind is risky, and that's exactly what you will be doing with a 508 and a TBD.

You are correct, though, that doing this will mitigate what would otherwise be a late complete date. It's workable if you have enough time to prepare for the test, but you still have to deal with the fact that schools like to see reapplicants take a break. This WOULD totally work for schools you didn't apply to last cycle, assuming you hit your target MCAT. Good luck!!!
I feel you, and that is why I said that if my practice scores aren't significantly better than a 508, I would push the exam back or cancel/whatever. I mean, I had this plan and I feel much better about attending medical school and feel much more confident in my choice. I feel pressure. I mean I will definitely be applying to different schools as I will probably throw out some low yields, and I had some other schools that really probably shouldn't be on my list. Maybe 10/20 were low yield or higher than my MCAT... if that helps at all. I have another in state school but they start in January. Was never my ideal location, but I didn't even realize they are like the only damn school that starts in january almost, and got an email basically saying that I was a ******* and that I wont be graduated by time school starts.
 
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GreenDuck12

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I am getting older and after my clinical experiences, albeit minor, I want to get out there soon and make a difference. I understand my app is not stellar but god dangit
This isn’t the right mentality to have during a competitive application cycle. You’re not older - trust me on this - so age shouldn’t be a factor in your decision making. Every applicant wants to make a difference but there are many ways to do so.

Your mentality needs to be what is it going to take to have the next application cycle be a successful one by having the best possible application. Remember 60% of all applicants are unsuccessful in a given year - you need to improve your application enough that the 20 schools that you previously applied to and did not grant you an interview would want to reconsider. An mcat score likely isn’t enough - especially with the context of your stellar gpa. This screams application overhaul which isn’t easily done in one year. My guess is something in your personal statement didn’t get a lot of traction. If you ended up on a waitlist things might be different. If you were granted more interviews things might be different.

Obviously you need to do what you feel is best. My perspective is that of an older applicant and mcat tutor. Over the years I have spent of the forum I can’t tell you how many folks have posts in similar positions as you and agonize over what to do next. Before you jump into the next cycle consider what happens if it doesn’t pan out. You would definitely be looking at at least one gap year, perhaps 2, and risk having a new mcat score expire.
 
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MisterTO

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This isn’t the right mentality to have during a competitive application cycle. You’re not older - trust me on this - so age shouldn’t be a factor in your decision making. Every applicant wants to make a difference but there are many ways to do so.

Your mentality needs to be what is it going to take to have the next application cycle be a successful one by having the best possible application. Remember 60% of all applicants are unsuccessful in a given year - you need to improve your application enough that the 20 schools that you previously applied to and did not grant you an interview would want to reconsider. An mcat score likely isn’t enough - especially with the context of your stellar gpa. This screams application overhaul which isn’t easily done in one year. My guess is something in your personal statement didn’t get a lot of traction. If you ended up on a waitlist things might be different. If you were granted more interviews things might be different.

Obviously you need to do what you feel is best. My perspective is that of an older applicant and mcat tutor. Over the years I have spent of the forum I can’t tell you how many folks have posts in similar positions as you and agonize over what to do next. Before you jump into the next cycle consider what happens if it doesn’t pan out. You would definitely be looking at at least one gap year, perhaps 2, and risk having a new mcat score expire.
I am just curious what you suggest would really bump my stuff up? I mean everyone is suggesting me take two years off until I would start med school to do what? Scribe? Volunteer? Research? I HAVE to work in some capacity (maybe scribing). I am genuinely curious what 2 more years is going to do?
 
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GreenDuck12

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I am just curious what you suggest would really bump my stuff up? I mean everyone is suggesting me take two years off until I would start med school to do what? Scribe? Volunteer? Research? I HAVE to work in some capacity (maybe scribing). Otherwords, research isn't for me. I am genuinely curious what 2 more years is going to do?
There are plenty of things you can do but it depends on your interests. Many younger folks in my class spent a few years as scribes, clinical research coordinators, research assistants, medical assistants, etc. There’s a reason why many of these jobs are filled with premeds because it does help with applications. Plenty more spent time working in non medical fields and built up their clinical experiences with volunteer work. You said you want to make a difference? Try to find work with non profits or government entities dedicated to serving high needs communities. It’ll certainly make for valuable learning experience and life experience to have as a doctor. Now for me, I was a nontrad. I became a teacher and only later decided to pursue a medical career. Personally, I think the fact that my background was different from my peers was helpful.

TLDR: basically any job that helps you gain experience with diverse populations and more clearly articulate why you want to spend the next 7+ years of your life becoming a physician.
 
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gonnif

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This isn’t the right mentality to have during a competitive application cycle. You’re not older - trust me on this - so age shouldn’t be a factor in your decision making. Every applicant wants to make a difference but there are many ways to do so.

Your mentality needs to be what is it going to take to have the next application cycle be a successful one by having the best possible application. Remember 60% of all applicants are unsuccessful in a given year - you need to improve your application enough that the 20 schools that you previously applied to and did not grant you an interview would want to reconsider. An mcat score likely isn’t enough - especially with the context of your stellar gpa. This screams application overhaul which isn’t easily done in one year. My guess is something in your personal statement didn’t get a lot of traction. If you ended up on a waitlist things might be different. If you were granted more interviews things might be different.

Obviously you need to do what you feel is best. My perspective is that of an older applicant and mcat tutor. Over the years I have spent of the forum I can’t tell you how many folks have posts in similar positions as you and agonize over what to do next. Before you jump into the next cycle consider what happens if it doesn’t pan out. You would definitely be looking at at least one gap year, perhaps 2, and risk having a new mcat score expire.
Strongly concur. Your attitude is all wrong. You are saying "Gung Ho", "Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead", "Charge!",no matter the weakness or the timing, you need to attack now. STOP AND THINK.
1) if you are MCAT weak then spend time prepping.
2) If you submit with an old score on first day, no school is obligated to wait for a new score. And if they do, it wont matter that you were transmitted day one. They wont look at your primary until the new score and there is where you sit in the pack.
3) You got one interview at your state school with a mediocre MCAT. You are in In state resident. For lack of a better way to say it for all we know your application could have been essentially a charity case, taking in lower stat residents. No other school even responded. So I would seriously take a look at your application as being alright.
4) and if you submit to schools day one with old score and even if they wait for new score, what happens if that too is mediocre. Many schools have a two application limit. They will not consider you again. Its two strikes and you are out.
5) Age? I send people to school in their 30's 40's and even a few in 50's

Will my age be used against me?
 
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MisterTO

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Strongly concur. Your attitude is all wrong. You are saying "Gung Ho", "Damn the Torpedoes, Full Speed Ahead", "Charge!",no matter the weakness or the timing, you need to attack now. STOP AND THINK.
1) if you are MCAT weak then spend time prepping.
2) If you submit with an old score on first day, no school is obligated to wait for a new score. And if they do, it wont matter that you were transmitted day one. They wont look at your primary until the new score and there is where you sit in the pack.
3) You got one interview at your state school with a mediocre MCAT. You are in In state resident. For lack of a better way to say it for all we know your application could have been essentially a charity case, taking in lower stat residents. No other school even responded. So I would seriously take a look at your application as being alright.
4) and if you submit to schools day one with old score and even if they wait for new score, what happens if that too is mediocre. Many schools have a two application limit. They will not consider you again. Its two strikes and you are out.
5) Age? I send people to school in their 30's 40's and even a few in 50's

Will my age be used against me?
22. I personally have issues with age, my god, I am a freak with it. I do know that the average is slightly higher for matriculants, like 24 or 25. I understand where you come from and I know that I have plenty of time left in my life (god willing). I also was very aware of my application and its lack of clinical experience, and the idea that I may not have a good cycle (although I didn't think that I had MAJOR holes). I even remember warning my mother, who is very caring and wants the best for me, that I may have to take a gap year or even two if i did not get in. She couldn't believe it. Told me the schools are crazy for not taking me, as a mother would say. I told her thanks and all, but this **** is competitive. I have pressure from my parents for getting in. Worse case scenario, I get my own apartment for 2022-2023 when they 'kick me' out in a sense. I was hoping to be traditional and get in right away and get on with my life; but part of me likes having a few years to enjoy before I start medical school as it will be a lot of my life gone working and studying a lot.

& I totally see where you are coming from my friend. I just hope you can and do see where I come from. Pressure from my mom and dad to get in ASAP (which is my biggest source of fear), pressure from friends, family, etc. I have three friends in undergraduate (all of which got in now (MD/JD, MD-rural program, and pre-acceptance MD), all of which had lower MCATs by some as much as 8 points. I should have tried one of those options, haha! I just wished to go in traditional and have options, but we see now how that turned out. I am just anxious, worried, but excited to have COVID-19 be over and to get more experiences, and I just am trying here. I just want you to understand my situation. I know you are a blunt and honest individual. I do respect that and thank you for your advice.
 

KnightDoc

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22. I personally have issues with age, my god, I am a freak with it. I do know that the average is slightly higher for matriculants, like 24 or 25. I understand where you come from and I know that I have plenty of time left in my life (god willing). I also was very aware of my application and its lack of clinical experience, and the idea that I may not have a good cycle (although I didn't think that I had MAJOR holes). I even remember warning my mother, who is very caring and wants the best for me, that I may have to take a gap year or even two if i did not get in. She couldn't believe it. Told me the schools are crazy for not taking me, as a mother would say. I told her thanks and all, but this **** is competitive. I have pressure from my parents for getting in. Worse case scenario, I get my own apartment for 2022-2023 when they 'kick me' out in a sense. I was hoping to be traditional and get in right away and get on with my life; but part of me likes having a few years to enjoy before I start medical school as it will be a lot of my life gone working and studying a lot.

& I totally see where you are coming from my friend. I just hope you can and do see where I come from. Pressure from my mom and dad to get in ASAP (which is my biggest source of fear), pressure from friends, family, etc. I have three friends in undergraduate (all of which got in now (MD/JD, MD-rural program, and pre-acceptance MD), all of which had lower MCATs by some as much as 8 points. I should have tried one of those options, haha! I just wished to go in traditional and have options, but we see now how that turned out. I am just anxious, worried, but excited to have COVID-19 be over and to get more experiences, and I just am trying here. I just want you to understand my situation. I know you are a blunt and honest individual. I do respect that and thank you for your advice.
Hey -- I TOTALLY feel you. You and your parents both need to know that a full 2/3 of matriculants nowadays have at least one gap year. After accounting for BS/MD students, that number is close to 75%. The deck was stacked against you going in, trying to be one of the 25% as a white male applicant with a great GPA, below average MCAT and unspectacular ECs, so don't beat yourself up and try to make your parents understand it's totally not your fault (other than not knowing to not try to rush an application through). 9,300 more people applied this cycle than last. As a result, plenty of people who look even better than you on paper had similar results.

Hindsight is 20/20, but anyone who knows what they are doing would have told you you're fighting an uphill battle without a gap year. Now, you're going to have a gap year, but you'll have to deal with all the BS associated with being a reapplicant. I honestly think you'll be in a far better position with your additional hours if you get your MCAT above 512.2 (white matriculant median). Just make sure to rewrite all your essays in case they contributed to your issues last cycle, and expand your school list to ensure you have a decent number of schools that will not view you as a reapplicant.
 

Goro

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Did you have DO schools on your list? If not you need to have them now with a below average MCAT score for MD, and as a reapplicant. Beggars can't be choosy, and you've already lost one year of clinician salary.

The fact that you have issues with your age at 22 is setting off alarm bells to me about your maturity.

I strongly suggest that you take a gap year and work, and especially stay off campus, and get out of your comfort zone.

Most importantly engage in service to others less fortunate than yourself.

And lastly, your MCAT score is not what kept you out of medical school.
 

MisterTO

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The fact that you have issues with your age at 22 is setting off alarm bells to me about your maturity.

It's not like I am balling in the corner that I am aging. I am not sure how being younger and not enjoying the idea of aging "sets off alarm bells" in regards to maturity. I am sure when I am 30 or 40, my perception on age will be different. I don't know. A gap year results in +2 years of "lost clinician salary" not 1. I guess it sounds like 2 gap years to me (or atleast two years out of undergrad). That is my biggest fear and maybe it is an ego thing for me, which I get I should drop. Thanks, and nice cat. I attached one of my 5 below, Betelgeuse.
beetle (2).jpg
 

Goro

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It's not like I am balling in the corner that I am aging. I am not sure how being younger and not enjoying the idea of aging "sets off alarm bells" in regards to maturity. I am sure when I am 30 or 40, my perception on age will be different. I don't know. A gap year results in +2 years of "lost clinician salary" not 1. I guess it sounds like 2 gap years to me (or atleast two years out of undergrad). That is my biggest fear and maybe it is an ego thing for me, which I get I should drop. Thanks, and nice cat. I attached one of my 5 below, Betelgeuse.
View attachment 334602
If you don't get into Medical School, you will not have any clinician salary.
 
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GreenDuck12

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I am not sure how being younger and not enjoying the idea of aging "sets off alarm bells" in regards to maturity.
Its an indication that one is more preoccupied with superficial things rather than more substantive things like being ready to make life and death decisions for the patients that you care for. There is a reason that the average age is 25 and 26 - it usually means that people have had a few years of working and living outside of the comfortable structures and boundaries of college. There is a lot of growing up that happens in those years. Now Im on the older side of my class but I cannot tell you how many of my classmates who are on the younger side and are struggling in medical school - less with academics and more with professionalism / interpersonal things. Unfortunately, it is really easy for our educators and attendings to tell who is a younger applicant vs who has had some life experience. As @Goro has pointed out in other posts, medical school admissions committees are largely the final arbiter in deciding who becomes a practicing physician in the US due to the high rate of passing boards and matching into residency programs from US MD programs. They definitely take their job seriously. As our dean of admissions says during each interview day - they want to catch applicants when they are ready to move forward with becoming a doctor as they have seen the trouble associated with admitting someone who is not ready.

Now none of this is to say that you would have those same struggles but to provide some additional context for the age of medical school matriculants. A lot of folks in my class who matriculated at 25, 26, and 27 applied right out of undergrad and did not get in. Some decided to work for a few years and waited to apply because they recognized that they needed more experience.

You've referenced pressure from your parents, peers, etc. Regardless of what you ultimately decide to do, I would highly encourage you to train yourself to stop comparing yourself to others and trying to meet the desires others have for you. This trait, probably more than any other, will absolutely destroy you in medical school. There will always be someone smarter, who earns higher test scores, who earns more publications, who matches into a higher ranked program, who matches into a more competitive speciality, who earns more money etc. My (younger) classmates who struggle the most have difficulty with taking exams and seeing scores that are lower than undergrad, or not being in the top 1%, 5%, 10%, or 50% of the class. They place too much emphasis on external factors and comparing themselves to others. The trick to making it through medical school is recognizing what you need to do to get to where you want to go, and managing your time and energy to get there.

Best of luck to you.
 
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Jan 23, 2021
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My advice it to get out of your parents house and do something interesting for a couple years. Do you have any idea how tiresome it is to see thousands of applications that are virtually indistinguishable? It's not your scores. Committees have a pile of a thousand white middle class early 20s applicants with all the boxes checked. They barely read them. I went to a top 5 school at 30 years old. I got in nowhere at 23. I sold cars, painted houses, finally found a research job in neuroscience, where I spent 5 years, and became an animal research neurosurgeon. I traveled, taught martial arts, worked extensively with disabled population, taught blind people to ski, became interesting. My peers were journalists, biology teachers, research scientists, musicians, and Olympic athletes. I'm not saying you have to do all that, but at 22, you have checked a lot of boxes and have done well, but you simply haven't had enough time to become interesting.
 
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