MCAT with an extended time accommodation - how does this affect application process

Great White Buffalo

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Thought I would throw this out there to any applicants who have taken MCAT with extended time accommodation. My sister just graduated with a 3.95 in physiology in 3.5 years at our state school, has done 1 year of basic research. Will be taking a couple of years off to do TFA. She had an accommodation in undergrad where she gets 1.5 hours to take a 1 hour test (diagnosed with delayed verbal fluency - - basically, she reads slowly). Obviously, she does just fine with add'l time. She took her first MCAT without an accommodation, and scored a 26 (10, 8, 8 Verbal). Her issue was actually finishing the test sections. She just got the neuropsy evaluation redone, with the same result that she should qualify for an extended time to take the MCAT.

Has anyone had issues with applications with the MCAT flag when taking the test with a time extension?? Just curious. She is retaking the test next year, before the new test comes online, but won't be applying until she finishes TFA. Just wondering about the success rate, or lack thereof, of folks with mild learning disabilities and the med school application process.
 
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BlackBox

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Thought I would throw this out there to any applicants who have taken MCAT with extended time accommodation. My sister just graduated with a 3.95 in physiology in 3.5 years at our state school, has done 1 year of basic research. Will be taking a couple of years off to do TFA. She had an accommodation in undergrad where she gets 1.5 hours to take a 1 hour test (diagnosed with delayed verbal fluency - - basically, she reads slowly). Obviously, she does just fine with add'l time. She took her first MCAT without an accommodation, and scored a 26 (10, 8, 8 Verbal). Her issue was actually finishing the test sections. She just got the neuropsy evaluation redone, with the same result that she should qualify for an extended time to take the MCAT.

Has anyone had issues with applications with the MCAT flag when taking the test with a time extension?? Just curious. She is retaking the test next year, before the new test comes online, but won't be applying until she finishes TFA. Just wondering about the success rate, or lack thereof, of folks with mild learning disabilities and the med school application process.


I can't speak to the success rate, but I have heard it is nearly impossible to gain accommodations for the MCAT after having successfully completed it. Her score is around the national average. This may pose a problem when making the argument for accommodations- not that I agree with this, but it is just what I heard.
 

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Thought I would throw this out there to any applicants who have taken MCAT with extended time accommodation. My sister just graduated with a 3.95 in physiology in 3.5 years at our state school, has done 1 year of basic research. Will be taking a couple of years off to do TFA. She had an accommodation in undergrad where she gets 1.5 hours to take a 1 hour test (diagnosed with delayed verbal fluency - - basically, she reads slowly). Obviously, she does just fine with add'l time. She took her first MCAT without an accommodation, and scored a 26 (10, 8, 8 Verbal). Her issue was actually finishing the test sections. She just got the neuropsy evaluation redone, with the same result that she should qualify for an extended time to take the MCAT.

Has anyone had issues with applications with the MCAT flag when taking the test with a time extension?? Just curious. She is retaking the test next year, before the new test comes online, but won't be applying until she finishes TFA. Just wondering about the success rate, or lack thereof, of folks with mild learning disabilities and the med school application process.

PM me....I got extra time for my mcat when it was on paper.
 
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Great White Buffalo

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I can't speak to the success rate, but I have heard it is nearly impossible to gain accommodations for the MCAT after having successfully completed it. Her score is around the national average. This may pose a problem when making the argument for accommodations- not that I agree with this, but it is just what I heard.
Yes, I've heard that. However, the AMCAS folks are asking her to submit her college transcripts, which show she can perform just fine with a bit of extra time. We'll see. I do know of some folks getting accommodations, but only after the lawyers got involved.
 

Dires

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It doesn't affect the application.
 
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I don't know about the MCAT, but on the USMLEs, if one requires extra time, the score report includes a note that an accommodation was made.

That being said, I have classmates who were given extra time in undergrad and in med school, but they were unable to get extra time on the MCAT
 
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Can't imagine that would matter for the application, I think if the MCAT administrators allowed it then it would just be viewed as normal for that person
 

Goro

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100% agree. When I review apps, I never see any hint of needing accommodation.

It doesn't affect the application.
 

Gauss44

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FYI - Disability lawyers can tell you where your application for extra time is weak and suggest ways to remedy that, if need be. I've known a few people who were denied accommodations initially, then got accommodated after going this route.

Questions for ADCOMs - I was also wondering how ADCOMs would view a 36 with accommodations versus a 35 without accommodations (MCAT score). Which is preferred these days? The accommodated 36 or the 35 without accommodations? What about a 34 without accommodations versus a 36 with accommodations? Does being accommodated on the MCAT essentially void your chance at getting a scholarship for high MCAT score plus high GPA?

(I was going to ask this anyway. Normally I would have created a new thread, but I believe that this is reasonably on topic. Plus, there's the whole shade of gray about throwing an existing thread "off topic" versus making a "duplicate thread.")
 
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Great White Buffalo

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FYI - Disability lawyers can tell you where your application for extra time is weak and suggest ways to remedy that, if need be. I've known a few people who were denied accommodations initially, then got accommodated after going this route.

Questions for ADCOMs - I was also wondering how ADCOMs would view a 36 with accommodations versus a 35 without accommodations (MCAT score). Which is preferred these days? The accommodated 36 or the 35 without accommodations? What about a 34 without accommodations versus a 36 with accommodations? Does being accommodated on the MCAT essentially void your chance at getting a scholarship for high MCAT score plus high GPA?

(I was going to ask this anyway. Normally I would have created a new thread, but I believe that this is reasonably on topic. Plus, there's the whole shade of gray about throwing an existing thread "off topic" versus making a "duplicate thread.")
Many thanks for your counsel. Yes, I have been told by other faculty members that they hired lawyers to get their kid an accommodation after initial denial. Have lawyers in the family, but they are not disability lawyers. Guess my Dad will have to pony up these fees too on top of all the other costs associated with applying.

This whole process is really skewed against lower SES. We struggle intellectually with not being SES, as we do have a somewhat unfair advantage in the whole process.
 
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masaraksh

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Just to play devils advocate:

- lots of people struggle with time on tests.
- plenty of people "read slowly". for instance: i) people for whom english is 2nd language or ii) just other normal people (like me) who are science majors. some of my humanities major friends can read at insane speed.
- "delayed verbal fluency" ... is that even legit? A quick google shows that its not in the DSM. Which does have specific guidelines for other disabilities such as ADD/ADHD/etc.
- I would argue that it seems like 'money and privilege buying an edge' if your family is able to pay to hire lawyers who know how to work the system/ present applicants case best in order to get an advantage (additional time).


as for 36 with acc. vs. 35 without: I'm pretty sure AdComs think of 35/36 as essentially the same exact score, regardless of whether there were accommodations.
 

MDforMee

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I have carpal tunnel and wrist injuries; I went to see my PCP and she gave me an extra time accommodation (for UG) without me even saying anything. I went in for a referral to a hand specialist to get a cortisone shot, but she's like "Hey, here's your extra time on all your tests." I get the feeling that students try to get extra time with phony excuses, honestly.

Anyhow, I looked into accommodations for the MCAT, and you have to have a letter from your treating physician (preferably a specialist, since technically, PCPs shouldn't be treating you for something that requires you to have accommodations in the first place) sent to AMCAS along with a lot of other stuff. It's really complex. The Office for Students with Disabilities at my old school told me that even students with dyslexia don't get approved by AMCAS. In other words, it's really hard to get approved for extra time unless you're missing an arm or have something really grievous, which it sounds like OPs sister doesn't have.

I got a 30 on the MCAT, but I'd feel guilty of trying to cheat the system if I attempted to retake it with extra time to try and boost my score, which, no offense, it sounds like she's doing. If she knew that her score would suffer without extra time, she shouldn't have taken it in the first place.

edit: I hope I don't seem like an ass, but "delayed verbal fluency" isn't even a legitimate diagnosis.
 
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OP, if your sister scored 13, 8, 13 then you could make an argument. Since she scored an 8 and a 10 on the other two sections, her 8 in verbal doesn't seem particularly out of place....with her level of prep for the test, she is a 26-caliber applicant. She needs to study harder and step it up if she wants admission.
 

masaraksh

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OP, if your sister scored 13, 8, 13 then you could make an argument. Since she scored an 8 and a 10 on the other two sections, her 8 in verbal doesn't seem particularly out of place....with her level of prep for the test, she is a 26-caliber applicant. She needs to study harder and step it up if she wants admission.
btw, OP, do her a favor and don't link her to this thread Christmas morning. not a very nice present


@kyamh
With a 13,8,13 could you really make that argument? Given that even MCAT science sections are so 'passage-based', I think being a 'slow reader' (for lack of better term) will hurt you on those almost as much.
 

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If that 10's in PS, this does seem like a problem with comprehension as both bio and verbal rely heavily on verbal comprehension.
 

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It doesn't affect the application.
This is untrue.

I qualified for extended time, as I was granted this in college. I opted for a standard exam administration after discussing this with 13 (no exaggeration) admissions directors. It bodes poorly for ones application - basically, the rationale I was almost indiscriminately given, was that you don't get "extra time" when you have 20 patients in one day, and you need to be able to manage your time efficiently in 3rd and 4th year, as well as the following 3-10 years after medical school in residency/fellowship. That being said, while it is not impossible to get accepted with a non-standard exam administration (they will not see what accommodation you received, but they will know it was not the conventional exam) it is VERY rare that it happens.
 
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Dires

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This is untrue.

I qualified for extended time, as I was granted this in college. I opted for a standard exam administration after discussing this with 13 (no exaggeration) admissions directors. It bodes poorly for ones application - basically, the rationale I was almost indiscriminately given, was that you don't get "extra time" when you have 20 patients in one day, and you need to be able to manage your time efficiently in 3rd and 4th year, as well as the following 3-10 years after medical school in residency/fellowship. That being said, while it is not impossible to get accepted with a non-standard exam administration (they will not see what accommodation you received, but they will know it was not the conventional exam) it is VERY rare that it happens.
How interesting that you were able to get 13 admissions directors to admit they violate the ADA by rejecting applicants on the basis of having a learning disability. Count me as skeptical. :laugh:
 

Dires

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Be as skeptical as you want - I already was accepted to medical school, so I'm not trying to fill some kind of personal void in my sentiments about applying. I'm just sharing the information that I know to be true. Feel free to ignore anything else I say though :)
Except for that what you are saying is completely false...
 
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Great White Buffalo

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Just to play devils advocate:

- lots of people struggle with time on tests.
- plenty of people "read slowly". for instance: i) people for whom english is 2nd language or ii) just other normal people (like me) who are science majors. some of my humanities major friends can read at insane speed.
- "delayed verbal fluency" ... is that even legit? A quick google shows that its not in the DSM. Which does have specific guidelines for other disabilities such as ADD/ADHD/etc.
- I would argue that it seems like 'money and privilege buying an edge' if your family is able to pay to hire lawyers who know how to work the system/ present applicants case best in order to get an advantage (additional time).


as for 36 with acc. vs. 35 without: I'm pretty sure AdComs think of 35/36 as essentially the same exact score, regardless of whether there were accommodations.
The actual diagnosis is processing speed deficit (Learning Disability, NOS, 315.9) per the Neuropsychologist (PhD)
 
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masaraksh

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The actual diagnosis is processing speed deficit (Learning Disability, NOS, 315.9) per the Neuropsychologist (PhD)
Thanks for looking it up. I know barely anything about learning impairments and disabilities so my search was just a crude google for "delayed verbal fluency".

Would a PhD trained Neuropsychologist be a good enough advocate to ask AAMC to allow for additional time? Or would an MD 'note' still be required?
 
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Great White Buffalo

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Thanks for looking it up. I know barely anything about learning impairments and disabilities so my search was just a crude google for "delayed verbal fluency".

Would a PhD trained Neuropsychologist be a good enough advocate to ask AAMC to allow for additional time? Or would an MD 'note' still be required?
This Neuropsychology Clinic is part of the Department of Psychiatry in a large academic medical center. The PhDs are licensed Clinical Psychologists in a PhD run Clinic. Under the licensing scope of practice, yada yada yada. This clinic is specific for testing, I guess. I got the diagnosis code right off her report which just came in. Same as it was 3.5 years ago (this is not newly diagnosed).

To anyone following this thread, I'll keep folks posted on the progress. Many thanks for all who have chimed in. This is definitely not a process for the faint of heart (the boatload of documentation alone is daunting - - every SAT/ACT/MCAT she ever took, plus HS and college transcripts, etc.)
 
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masaraksh

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I had another thought...

Is it possible for her to like... drink a lot of coffee or take something like ADD medication before the test so that she could actually normally within the time limit.

OK - obviously this is controversial and maybe not the best medical advice, but it is a fact that some people in college take ADD medications in order to work/study harder. Again, just trying to think outside the box on this one.
 
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Great White Buffalo

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I had another thought...

Is it possible for her to like... drink a lot of coffee or take something like ADD medication before the test so that she could actually normally within the time limit.

OK - obviously this is controversial and maybe not the best medical advice, but it is a fact that some people in college take ADD medications in order to work/study harder. Again, just trying to think outside the box on this one.
Hmm, our dad is child psychiatrist, so he would have an absolute cow about that. It is his opinion you can't "medicate" a learning disability they way you can medicate depression and psychosis. Others do abuse Adderall, which now makes his job harder, as folks want that prescription so they can sell it. Folks are now abusing Ritalin now too.
 

masaraksh

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Hmm, our dad is child psychiatrist, so he would have an absolute cow about that. It is his opinion you can't "medicate" a learning disability they way you can medicate depression and psychosis. Others do abuse Adderall, which now makes his job harder, as folks want that prescription so they can sell it. Folks are now abusing Ritalin now too.
Well it's also very debatable how much you can successfully 'medicate' depression. I am aware that people abuse Adderall, etc. To me that seems very crazy though. If I've had a lot of work, coffee has worked well enough.

By the way, you & your dad might enjoy this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Epidemic-Bullets-Psychiatric-Astonishing/dp/0307452425
 

MDforMee

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Your dad's a shrink and you're getting a "diagnosis" letter penciled in by a psychologist? Cough cough cough.

Did you not read what the other poster said, either? Or read what I wrote? You're attempting to help your sister get a few extra points on a test in return for a red flag in her application, while helping her avoid accountability. A 3.95 in physiology, too? What school was this, and are they accepting applications?
 
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Dires

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It actually isn't. What you are positing is more of a philosophical sentiment than what actually happens.
No what I'm positing is not philosophical. I don't think you even understand how the process works. During the entire application process all the school knows is that the MCAT was not taken under "standard conditions". That means the student could have a temporary physical disability, a long term physical impairment, a learning disability, a medical condition, ect. So I apologize if I find it fascinating that more than 13 admissions directors told you that they devalue applications if this one box is checked. Which again might I add is against the law.

It is not a rejection based on disability - your MCAT score is not considered as competitive - and we all know the name of the game is "be competitive." They ADCOMS are free to assign whatever merit they wish to the elements of ones application - it is a very difficult thing to come back from.
and
That being said, while it is not impossible to get accepted with a non-standard exam administration (they will not see what accommodation you received, but they will know it was not the conventional exam) it is VERY rare that it happens.
You do realize that most classes have students who receive accommodations right? Its not "very rare" for a disabled student to get accepted. There are several in my class and I'm sure there are some in your class. Additionally, all of these students will more than likely receive accommodations on the USMLE. If you are a student who has actually required accommodations in the past you took some pretty poor advice. The USMLE is even more stringent in their requirements for receiving accommodations than the AAMC and they usually require a long history of proof.

Furthermore, I don't know if there are statistics available showing how many students requiring accommodations apply and are accepted/rejected, but that would be what is required to prove your hypothesis. Otherwise, it's your message board here-say versus what was written into law in the ADA.
 
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Dires

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Whatever you say, chief. I'm pretty sure I know what I am talking about, and you seem confident that you think you know what you are talking about, and we aren't going to convince each other otherwise. I say just drop it.
I can agree to disagree :)
 

masaraksh

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Just to throw some heat into the fire... perhaps applicants who require accommodation are less desirable if you imagine how they may work as doctors:

- they may take 1.5 times as long on patient visits/consults and be slower at writing/dictating the medical record notes. this would decrease patient throughput.
- would perform less procedures per unit time
- slower to react, comprehend, respond to urgent issues which could compromise care.

obviously these are huge generalizations but the thought is that if you look at disability as a spectrum there is a point at which the disability is significant barrier to a person functioning in the critical role of a professional.
 
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This is untrue.

I qualified for extended time, as I was granted this in college. I opted for a standard exam administration after discussing this with 13 (no exaggeration) admissions directors. It bodes poorly for ones application - basically, the rationale I was almost indiscriminately given, was that you don't get "extra time" when you have 20 patients in one day, and you need to be able to manage your time efficiently in 3rd and 4th year, as well as the following 3-10 years after medical school in residency/fellowship. That being said, while it is not impossible to get accepted with a non-standard exam administration (they will not see what accommodation you received, but they will know it was not the conventional exam) it is VERY rare that it happens.
I am also highly skeptical. I cannot believe that 13 different admissions directors would admit to violating the law to a prospective student.
 
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Great White Buffalo

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Your dad's a shrink and you're getting a "diagnosis" letter penciled in by a psychologist? Cough cough cough.

Did you not read what the other poster said, either? Or read what I wrote? You're attempting to help your sister get a few extra points on a test in return for a red flag in her application, while helping her avoid accountability. A 3.95 in physiology, too? What school was this, and are they accepting applications?
Well, yeah my Dad is a "shrink", ahem an MD/PhD (back before it was "popular"), did his 6 year residency at Stanford. Hopefully medical school classes in neuro-behavioral medicine will increase everyone's knowledge of psychiatry. Many academic medical centers have boatloads of social workers, psychologists and nurse practioners within the psychiatry department. Each has a valuable contribution to make to a team approach to helping folks across a continuum of disability. The goal is always to enhance functionality and quality of life, and in severe cases, safety.

While the psychiatrist deal with more acute issues, these PhD are experts in testing and learning disabilities. He has a lot of respect for his colleagues expertise in their areas of practice. All of medicine is now a team approach, and at his institution, respect is a given, not a courtesy.
 
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How interesting that you were able to get 13 admissions directors to admit they violate the ADA by rejecting applicants on the basis of having a learning disability. Count me as skeptical. :laugh:
Oh, please, I've heard ADCOMs and faculty members who interview applicants for residency say things that violate ADA, ERAS, and title IX
 

Dires

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Oh, please, I've heard ADCOMs and faculty members who interview applicants for residency say things that violate ADA, ERAS, and title IX
So what's your point?
 

Dires

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I don't think the poster who said he/she contacted 13 schools is making it up
So you buy into the main point that there is rampant prejudice against disabled students in the medical school admission process?
 
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So you buy into the main point that there is rampant prejudice against disabled students in the medical school admission process?
Well considering I've hear first-hand, yes, yes I believe it exists. Is it rampant? I cannot say
 
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I'm just going to put the information out there that if someone has a learning disability such as dyslexia more likely than not, they have a diagnoses from an earlier age than college. MCAT accommodations will more likely be given to an individual who has proof that they have been given accommodations throughout their education history. I know people who have and have not been successful in gaining accommodations and the common questioned asked was extensive verification that they have been given accommodations in early education. I have talked to an education specialist who has helped people get accommodations for both the LSAT and MCAT. She said it is much easier to get accommodations for the LSAT with a new diagnoses, but she has yet to have a client get accommodations for the MCAT with a new diagnoses. All that have been successful at getting any form of accommodations had accommodations dating back to at least high school, but many even farther back from elementary school.
 
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So you buy into the main point that there is rampant prejudice against disabled students in the medical school admission process?
Why not? The "discrimination" has to happen somewhere, if not at medical school then at residency. Someone with muscular dystrophy will never be an orthopedic surgeon, which is incredibly physically demanding, or never be any surgeon for that matter. Is that a problem? If someone is deaf they are not going to go to medical school because they cannot communicate with the vast majority of patients, do you think this is a problem? If someone is completely blind, they can't be a physician since they can't diagnose well. Problem?

Should not students with a history of anger issues be evaluated more carefully before entering medical school? What about students who have a severe speech impediment? What about students who have poorly managed depression who may come to mental harm as a result of the stress and proximity to death/illness?

Why are you putting up a stink about mental disabilities while we are perfectly fine about accepting physical disabilities as reasons to bar students from becoming physicians?
 
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Why not? The "discrimination" has to happen somewhere, if not at medical school then at residency. Someone with muscular dystrophy will never be an orthopedic surgeon, which is incredibly physically demanding, or never be any surgeon for that matter. Is that a problem? If someone is deaf they are not going to go to medical school because they cannot communicate with the vast majority of patients, do you think this is a problem? If someone is completely blind, they can't be a physician since they can't diagnose well. Problem?

Should not students with a history of anger issues be evaluated more carefully before entering medical school? What about students who have a severe speech impediment? What about students who have poorly managed depression who may come to mental harm as a result of the stress and proximity to death/illness?

Why are you putting up a stink about mental disabilities while we are perfectly fine about accepting physical disabilities as reasons to bar students from becoming physicians?
Well, at the University of Michigan, the Chairman of Family Medicine (Dr. Zazove) is indeed deaf. And the Chairwoman of Neurosurgery at the same University (Dr. Muraszko) is a woman who has spinal bifida (needed a special wheelchair to prop her up when she use to do neurosurgeries). Both are heralded at U of M, and have been very upfront in discussing their disabilities.

Please read an inspiring story (very short) of Dr. Muraszko:

http://umhsheadlines.org/25/dr-muraszko-featured-in-ama-presidents-speech/

Excerpt from the speech above:

"But three obstacles stood in her way. First, she was only four feet nine inches tall, which would make reaching the operating table a challenge. Second, she was a woman, and almost 95% of neurosurgeons are male.
And third, she had a disability. As a result of her spina bifida, one of Karin’s legs is 2 inches shorter than the other. And in neurosurgery, where operations can take 12, 15, even 18 hours, it’s essential that physicians are physically, as well as mentally strong.
While the challenges before Karin were great, her determination was even greater. I told her that she was going to have to prove herself – even “over-prove” herself to achieve her goal.
I knew she could. I knew she would. And of course . . . she did!"

Let's open our thinking about what is possible!! These 2 pioneers are exceptional human beings, not letting their disabilities define them.
 

moco89

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Medicine is a very conservative field. I am not against people with disabilities using accommodations.

However, there is probably a high probability that your sister will be discriminated against for using extended testing time, which will be flagged. She will have to search for schools that are very sensitive and understanding of nearly all disabilities. In addition, on the Osteopathic forums, there is somebody almost every year that received extended testing time for the MCAT that was unable to get extended testing time for the USMLE. They ended up not passing the USMLE, multiple times, mostly because they could not get accomodations. They end up being completely out of luck and cannot continue in school.

I am facing potential discrimination issues at my former university due to taking medical withdrawal 4 times, due to serious unresolvable issues during the semester, mostly due to having a previously undiagnosed rare disease. I tested positive for the ganglionic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody, and I have autonomic dysfunction. Administrators at my engineering school thought my withdrawals were excessive and they said that they might not give me medical withdrawal anymore (as in give me Fs) or not let me repeat courses due to medical withdrawals (as in not let me finish my degree). Needless to say, I am now completing my engineering degree at an ABET-accredited program completely online, even with the consequences involved potentially with medical school (if I am able to pursue it).

I am just saying, she is going to have to be careful. I am aware you seem pretty confident that she can do medical school, but just do whatever you can to ensure her success. Since she has a print-related disability, has she considered using Bookshare.org for medical school or university? They digitize required school textbooks for free and they have software that reads the books aloud to you, on virtually all platforms, but it is best on the iPad. Also, Kurzweil 3000 is amazing, but expensive. If you have Bookshare, you don't necessarily need Kurzweil 3000, but that depends if you want to use Kurzweil 3000 as a screenreader to read the web or anything other than books.
 
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deanthedream17

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How interesting that you were able to get 13 admissions directors to admit they violate the ADA by rejecting applicants on the basis of having a learning disability. Count me as skeptical. :laugh:
It doesn't violate the ADA. The argument for extra time on the MCAT and other accommodations has gone up against the justice system and there is a clear need to only grant extra time and accommodations under extreme circumstances to best provide medical care. A deaf medical student from creighton sued the school for wanting a translator during rotations and lost under the grounds that it would limit patient comfort in providing necessary private details to the doctor/medical student.

Remember medical students must meet certain necessary skills and functions
 

Dires

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It doesn't violate the ADA. The argument for extra time on the MCAT and other accommodations has gone up against the justice system and there is a clear need to only grant extra time and accommodations under extreme circumstances to best provide medical care. A deaf medical student from creighton sued the school for wanting a translator during rotations and lost under the grounds that it would limit patient comfort in providing necessary private details to the doctor/medical student.

Remember medical students must meet certain necessary skills and functions
https://www.aamc.org/members/gsa/64660/gsa_ada.html

http://nad.org/news/2013/9/deaf-medical-student-wins-ada-case-against-creighton

What the $&@# are you talking about?

Why not? The "discrimination" has to happen somewhere, if not at medical school then at residency. Someone with muscular dystrophy will never be an orthopedic surgeon, which is incredibly physically demanding, or never be any surgeon for that matter. Is that a problem? If someone is deaf they are not going to go to medical school because they cannot communicate with the vast majority of patients, do you think this is a problem? If someone is completely blind, they can't be a physician since they can't diagnose well. Problem?

Should not students with a history of anger issues be evaluated more carefully before entering medical school? What about students who have a severe speech impediment? What about students who have poorly managed depression who may come to mental harm as a result of the stress and proximity to death/illness?

Why are you putting up a stink about mental disabilities while we are perfectly fine about accepting physical disabilities as reasons to bar students from becoming physicians?
Profound ignorance.
 
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AspiringERMD

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This is untrue.

I qualified for extended time, as I was granted this in college. I opted for a standard exam administration after discussing this with 13 (no exaggeration) admissions directors. It bodes poorly for ones application - basically, the rationale I was almost indiscriminately given, was that you don't get "extra time" when you have 20 patients in one day, and you need to be able to manage your time efficiently in 3rd and 4th year, as well as the following 3-10 years after medical school in residency/fellowship. That being said, while it is not impossible to get accepted with a non-standard exam administration (they will not see what accommodation you received, but they will know it was not the conventional exam) it is VERY rare that it happens.
+1. Apart from talking to 13 admissions directors, this was me. Qualified, received it, but waved it in the end. I didn't like the fact that admissions workers would see that I had extended time, so I decided to chance it. Not sure whether I regret it or not. I rushed like crazy and barely finished all the questions. Had to take some random stabs. Then again, normal applicants do, sometimes.