Avicenna

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5+ Year Member
Nov 18, 2012
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Pre-Medical
I tried emailing several biomed professors in my university about getting a research position in my first semester of college, but none of them emailed back. (It had nothing to do with the email content, as I'm confident that I was respectful and expressed authentic interest in the field of research).

This second semester, I was talking to my chemistry professor and when I expressed an interest in researching, he offered me a position. The problem is that his research has to do with carbon nanotube composites and polymer derived ceramics - this is all industrial and has little relation to medicine.

Will being involved in this lab be as effective as working in a more medically relevant field of research for getting me into medical school? Should I take this position, or continue emailing professors whose research's focus is more biological than physical?
 
Last edited:
Aug 8, 2013
1,395
903
Michigan
Status
Medical Student
You should think about what research will be interesting to you. Research can be long and tedious and frustrating and boring...you need to make sure you are interested enough to persevere through those challenges.

My research is not medically relevant and I have had no troubles so far.

Edit: remember that the point of doing research is not the topic you research since you won't find a cure for cancer as an undergrad anyhow. Research help you work on your problem solving skills, teaches you to read primary literature, teaches you responsibility and hard work, teaches you to communicate effectively orally and in writing, teaches you to work as a part of a team, and gives you a chance to become an expect in a specific topic that excites you.
 

gig123

5+ Year Member
Sep 18, 2013
28
1
Status
Pre-Medical
If you're interested in those topics then absolutely accept the offer. If not, then keep looking. Medical schools value all types of research, as long as you're doing something significant (helping out on projects, starting your own project, etc)
 

mcloaf

7+ Year Member
Jan 21, 2012
5,176
4,648
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Resident [Any Field]
Research is research, and TBH applied chemistry is probably a lot more medically relevant than plenty of other things people do research on before medical school. If you like the PI and the material, go for it.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
52,547
76,171
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
Research is research. If you're learning about the scientific principal, whether you're researching clams from the South Pacific or Huntington's disease, it's OK.

I tried emailing several biomed professors in my university about getting a research position in my first semester of college, but none of them emailed back. (It had nothing to do with the email content, as I'm confident that I was respectful and expressed authentic interest in the field of research).

This second semester, I was talking to my chemistry professor and when I expressed an interest in researching, he offered me a position. The problem is that his research has to do with carbon nanotube composites and polymer derived ceramics - this is all industrial and has little relation to medicine.

Will being involved in this lab be as effective as working in a more medically relevant field of research? Should I take this position, or continue emailing professors whose research's focus is more biological than physical?
 

HelpPleaseMD

7+ Year Member
Aug 4, 2011
1,057
234
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Resident [Any Field]
though if there is a specific field you are interested in, its nice to research in that area.
 
Dec 4, 2013
618
697
Status
Medical Student
I tried emailing several biomed professors in my university about getting a research position in my first semester of college, but none of them emailed back. (It had nothing to do with the email content, as I'm confident that I was respectful and expressed authentic interest in the field of research).

This second semester, I was talking to my chemistry professor and when I expressed an interest in researching, he offered me a position. The problem is that his research has to do with carbon nanotube composites and polymer derived ceramics - this is all industrial and has little relation to medicine.

Will being involved in this lab be as effective as working in a more medically relevant field of research for getting me into medical school? Should I take this position, or continue emailing professors whose research's focus is more biological than physical?
Super interesting fields that could have potential orthopedic implications down the line? Ceramics are already being looked at for resurfacing. Get involved it sounds good to me.