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DrRowing81

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I know there is a thread on books for surgery, but this one is a little more particular and it would take forever to go through all those pages from that thread. Does anyone have a recommendation for a good "medicine" book for surgeons. I really enjoy my medicine rotation I am on right now, and I am getting pretty comfortable and confident taking care of medical patient problems. I would like to carry that over into surgery. I want to be able to manage my SICU patients acute MI and know what meds to put him on and so on and so on. So, is there a concise book out there that I could keep handy that would be good to have to help me keep on top of the "medicine" aspect of surgery

Thanks a bunch
 

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I know there is a thread on books for surgery, but this one is a little more particular and it would take forever to go through all those pages from that thread. Does anyone have a recommendation for a good "medicine" book for surgeons. I really enjoy my medicine rotation I am on right now, and I am getting pretty comfortable and confident taking care of medical patient problems. I would like to carry that over into surgery. I want to be able to manage my SICU patients acute MI and know what meds to put him on and so on and so on. So, is there a concise book out there that I could keep handy that would be good to have to help me keep on top of the "medicine" aspect of surgery

Thanks a bunch

There are a few that are good.

Medical Management of the Surgical Patient by Merli and Weitz - although I don't know when the last edition was printed

Surgical Critical Care - one of the Hopkins Resident's series...of course, focuses mostly on critically ill patients but has a lot of medicine in it.
 

DrRowing81

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Thank you so much Dr. Cox!! Did you find that you were able to take care of your surgical patients medical problems throughout residency? I know alot of times attendings want you to consult for everything because its their skin if you do something wrong.
 
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boston

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Marino's - The ICU Book is pretty practical too. Also there's a new edition just out, so that's even more incentive to shell out $. :smuggrin:

Thank you so much Dr. Cox!! Did you find that you were able to take care of your surgical patients medical problems throughout residency? I know alot of times attendings want you to consult for everything because its their skin if you do something wrong.

I know you didn't ask me, but I thought I'd chime in anyway. As a general surgery resident, you will become proficient in managing the routine critical care issues. At many programs, you will get a lot of critical care experience as a PGY-2 and will become comfortable with managing ARDS, ATN, enteral/parental feeding, sepsis, adrenal insufficiency, etc. Usually we consult medical services when we have a specific question, things become complicated, or the patient is not doing well and we want to make sure we are not overlooking anything. By the time they see your patient, you will already have finished rounds, written your orders, and be in the OR.
 

DrRowing81

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sweet....thats why I love general surgery so much....its the best of both worlds, you get to operate AND be a real doctor! Thanks for the input
 

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Thank you so much Dr. Cox!! Did you find that you were able to take care of your surgical patients medical problems throughout residency? I know alot of times attendings want you to consult for everything because its their skin if you do something wrong.


I felt quite comfortable managing most medical problems, especially in the ICU and would even get a bit frustrated when certain attendings would "consult everything out" (that tended to occur more at the Community hospital we spent a few months at - sometimes it was a "you wash my back I'll wash yours" sort of arrangement.

If problems became complicated or the patient needed in-depth care (ie, dialysis) we would consult the appropriate service, but for post-op MIs, drug withdrawal, etc. I pretty much knew by PGY2 exactly what the recommendations would be.

BTW, Marino's is an excellent book, although its a BOOK, but great for critical care.
 
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