juniper456

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Aug 11, 2004
209
0
Status
TPR says to memorize the values of various IR and NMR spectra signals (for different functional groups, types of hydrogens, etc). is this really necessary? it seems like overkill to me. . .
 

Turkeyman

Trickster Poultry
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 26, 2004
1,164
1
35
Silver Spring, Maryland
Status
EK says that for NMR, you'll find electron donating groups upfield(to the right on the NMR graph) b/c they shield the proton. You'll find electron withdrawing groups downfield (left side).

From there you can estimate...so just know your electron donating and withdrawing groups (back from when you studied benzene ring activation/deactivation/positioning
 

tank you

2K Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Jul 19, 2004
2,293
1
36
california
www.last.fm
Status
for IR, u should know carbonyl stretch (1600), OH stretch (~3200)..
for nmr, u should know how to read the graph and tell # of equivalent H.
 
About the Ads

longhorndoc

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Sep 1, 2004
51
0
Status
jtank said:
for IR, u should know carbonyl stretch (1600), OH stretch (~3200)..
for nmr, u should know how to read the graph and tell # of equivalent H.
Ditto. NMR and IR values are relatively easy to memorize for the most commonly used groups. Make cards and you'll know them in a day. It's worth knowing b/c you may get a freestanding question or freestanding like question w/ a passage asking what the value is. These are such EASY questions that I would hate to miss them due to not memorizing them. Don't stress over them though b/c you're likely to only get one question on this if even any. Good luck
 

MoosePilot

Y Bombardier
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 26, 2004
11,735
3
45
Unfathomable
Status
Medical Student
Depends what score you're shooting for. I memorized the most important ones and needed them. If you're only going for the 30, then you might spend your time more productively elsewhere.
 

Economist

Member
10+ Year Member
5+ Year Member
Dec 7, 2004
36
0
Status
If you've taken 2 semesters of orgo and/or orgo lab, you should have enough memorized already. You really only need the major functional groups for IR and proton NMR. And as a previous poster said, you should understand splitting.
 

MoosePilot

Y Bombardier
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
May 26, 2004
11,735
3
45
Unfathomable
Status
Medical Student
Economist said:
If you've taken 2 semesters of orgo and/or orgo lab, you should have enough memorized already. You really only need the major functional groups for IR and proton NMR. And as a previous poster said, you should understand splitting.
Ok, this one probably varies by the person. I hope, or else I'm just weird. If I don't have to memorize something, I'll almost never memorize detail just randomly. Like the IR thing. If I know I'm always going to have access to charts, I'll never have it in memory unless I just work with it *way too often*.

Anyone else like that? I can memorize it just fine if I need to (although it's already gone again from last April), but I don't do it naturally.
 

virilep

What can Brown do for u?
15+ Year Member
Feb 12, 2004
1,563
5
37
Visit site
Status
for the time u spend readng this thread and the updates, u could have already memorized it.... bust out that whiteboard.
 

45408

aw buddy
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Jun 14, 2004
16,972
47
Status
Resident [Any Field]
juniper456 said:
TPR says to memorize the values of various IR and NMR spectra signals (for different functional groups, types of hydrogens, etc). is this really necessary? it seems like overkill to me. . .
nope



you should be able to pick off a methyl group or an aromatic ring on NMR or a ketone or hydroxy group on IR, but not much else.
 

Shrike

Lanius examinatianus
10+ Year Member
Apr 23, 2004
646
4
too far south
Status
I saw a free-standing question on my August 2004 test that required knowing one of the numbers, I forget which one. Demoralizing for those of us who look at the MCAT as a reading comprehension test.

Shrike
TPR physics, verbal, bio (and unfortunately not chemistry)
 
About the Ads