1. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.

Military EM

Discussion in 'Emergency Medicine' started by paradude, Dec 9, 2005.

  1. paradude

    paradude Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    I've been accepted at USUHS. Could any current or former military ER docs comment on how similar/different a career in military EM is compared to practicing in the civilian world? I've spent 8 years enlisted AF so I'm not really looking for comments about making a transition to life in the military but I'm just interested in learning what my future practice will look like.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Apollyon

    Apollyon Screw the GST
    Physician Lifetime Donor Classifieds Approved 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Messages:
    19,277
    Likes Received:
    3,691
    One of our attendings is an Army reservist, and has been called up twice in the past 2 1/2 years. He did a tour in Iraq (where he was the doc for an EPW camp that had 12000 inmates in a site for 6000), and then, more recently, was at Bragg. As he summarized it, just like any other EM job, except the patients tend to be younger and healthier, and a lot of ortho and STD's.

    And the UOD is as ordered by the CO - for him, it was scrubs or BDU's. No class B's and the white coat.
     
  4. The White Coat Investor

    The White Coat Investor AKA ActiveDutyMD
    Physician Partner Organization 10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2002
    Messages:
    5,145
    Likes Received:
    2,222
    Status:
    Attending Physician
    That's a very optimistic view of military EM. I hope it turns out that good when I get there next summer. From the one month rotation I did back as a medical student, there is significantly less acuity, significantly less pay, and significantly more bureaucratic headaches than in civilian practice. Combined with mandatory vacations to hot sandy places, it can't be beat. Ask me again in a year, hopefully it won't be as bad as I imagine.
     
  5. MoosePilot

    MoosePilot Y Bombardier
    7+ Year Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Messages:
    11,735
    Likes Received:
    2
    Status:
    Medical Student
    Congrats! Good question, thanks, I want to hear the answers too.
     
  6. paradude

    paradude Junior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2005
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    anybody interested in responding to this? It was posted on the military interest thread in response to the same question posed by me in this interest group.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    I'm sure you've heard this before, but don't get too set on one specialty yet. As far as ER goes, there are some advantages to being a military ER doc versus civilian. In the civilian world, ER docs are getting hosed w/ malpractice and also end up doing primary care for the dredges of society. In the military, you don't have to deal with a bunch of IV drug abusing, painkiller seeking, system leeching scumbags. That said, you'll still be considered the biggest idiot in your hospital (military or civ).
    __________________
    Be bold and courageous. When you look back on your life, you'll regret the things you didn't do more than the ones you did.
    -H Jackson Brown Jr
     
  7. BKN

    BKN Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2005
    Messages:
    1,560
    Likes Received:
    4
    In peacetime, I found Military EM dull. You're taking care of the healthiest population in the world. Since the care is free, they have no reason not to come in. I ran an AF ED. We saw 150 pts daily and admitted about 5. The rest were viral syndromes and other irritations. If we wanted to be too busy and bored at the same time, we would have picked FP. All of the docs in my group got out as soon as they could, some were very bitter.

    In war, of course, it's a different story. There's excitement, stress and boredom. Most of the heatlhcare givers carry some scars.

    All in all, unless you have a deep commitment to serving your country, I suggest considering alternatives.
     

Share This Page