HSbF6

Pharmacy Student
Mar 15, 2010
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Is anyone here a military reservist and attends pharmacy school? Is this even possible? Know anyone that has or is?
 

eekOMG

7+ Year Member
Oct 8, 2009
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Virginia
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Pharmacist
I will go and say that it is probably not possible. There are options if you want to do military and pharmacy though.

Send me a PM. I'm planning to do military after pharmacy school.
 

tm79602

7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2009
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Pharmacy Student
I am a military reservist right now and I applied to one pharmacy school and going on the interview next week. It is possible. I separated active duty almost a year ago ( did 7 years active ). The reason why I joined reserves is because my contract was not up in the active side and I wanted to go to pharmacy school now. I easily did my reserve duty one weekend a month when I was getting my prereqs done at a university. My duty station was 2 hours away and had to make the drive every first Friday. I got to stay in really nice hotels, though- that is one of the perks. I just got approved to go IRR ( inactive ) due to me moving to attend pharmacy school once I am accepted. My main focus wants to be on school. My husband is doing the same thing and joining the reserves from active duty to finish his prereqs for dental school. It is possible, it just takes a commitment. There is a possibility that you can get deployed, but pharmacy technicians rarely get deployed and you have so many people volunteering to deploy in the reserves for the extra money and benefits since they are on active duty status when deployed. Now, if there was a emergency in the US, then that is a different story ( ex: 911 attacks ). I have personally witnessed 2 other people who I went to basic training with who are
reservists and started pharmacy school a couple of years ago. They are doing fine and the reserves is helping pay for some tuition. So yes, it is possible - just takes commitment. PM me if you have more questions. Good luck!
 
Last edited:
Oct 12, 2009
14
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Pre-Pharmacy
I personally will be drilling in another state when I attend pharmacy school in Colorado this August. It is completely possible to do this.
 

IrishRxMan

10+ Year Member
May 1, 2008
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Pharmacy Student
I know a guy that was in the reserves and in pharmacy school. You are taking a serious risk by doing pharmacy school while in the reserves because your chances of getting deployed are very high and the fact that you are in a program like pharmacy school does not matter to Uncle Sam. My friend dodged getting deployed by moving to the IRR (Inactive Ready Reserves) but that's only like putting a bandaid on a crack in the Hoover Dam. You still have a target, so to speak, on you to get pulled and deployed eventually. If you want to get money to help with paying for the tuition, look into the ROTC program. They always have booths set up at every APhA convention trying to get people to join. They will help you with some of the tuition, but not all. You also will get a monthly stipend to help with living expenses, which is nice. I believe you will only owe about 4 to 6 years to the government after graduation, but don't quote me on that.
 

tm79602

7+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2009
316
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Kansas
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Pharmacy Student
I know a guy that was in the reserves and in pharmacy school. You are taking a serious risk by doing pharmacy school while in the reserves because your chances of getting deployed are very high and the fact that you are in a program like pharmacy school does not matter to Uncle Sam. My friend dodged getting deployed by moving to the IRR (Inactive Ready Reserves) but that's only like putting a bandaid on a crack in the Hoover Dam. You still have a target, so to speak, on you to get pulled and deployed eventually. If you want to get money to help with paying for the tuition, look into the ROTC program. They always have booths set up at every APhA convention trying to get people to join. They will help you with some of the tuition, but not all. You also will get a monthly stipend to help with living expenses, which is nice. I believe you will only owe about 4 to 6 years to the government after graduation, but don't quote me on that.
It depends on what career field you are in- some career fields deploy more than others. I was a pharmacy technician for 6 years active duty and 1 year reserves- not once did I have to deploy. I am Air Force. They usually choose active duty first, then they go to reservist to fill those slots. People jump at the chance of deploying, because they want the extra money and benefits that comes along with being on active duty status while deployed. Yes, there is a chance, but it depends on what branch of the military you are in and your career field. My husband loads bombs on the B1 and he has deployed once in 7 years. They deploy alot. I am going to IRR status in a month and I am not worried. Only if a world disaster hits when they MIGHT call me back. I read somewhere that you can opt out of it if you are in pharmacy school, for example. I have experience.
 

Passion4Sci

LML
Moderator Emeritus
10+ Year Member
Mar 18, 2009
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Palo Alto, CA
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Pharmacy Student
Ah, IRR...

I remember that IAW AR 135-91, which governs reserve type stuff, the worst they can do IS give you an other than honorable (OTH) discharge.

Pursuant to:

If you are found to be an "unsatisfactory participant" in IRR, your file will be brought to review, and the worst judicial/non-judicial punishment:

(2) The enlisted soldier will be processed for discharge per AR 135–178, chapter 13.

Once the action is complete you will receive a discharge letter. You will likely receive an reenlistment code - 4 (RE4) which means you can't reenlist in any service without a waiver. Waivers are hard to get these days because recruiting is going well because of the economy.

Some people do get general, under honorable conditions as well... it all depends on your manner of "unsat. performance". So, if you just don't respond to the first letter then the certified letter mustering you, then that's what happens. No court time, no nothing. But it can look bad when you apply for work.

Hope that helped.