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"model system/program"

Discussion in 'PM&R' started by lucyz02, Dec 1, 2005.

  1. lucyz02

    lucyz02 Junior Member
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    When a program say they have the "model" program for SCI or TBI or whatever;what exactly does that mean. These prgorams mention this accreditation status as I assume to sell their program. It sounds impressive, but I actually have not idea what that entails. Is this the CARF approval? Thanks for your input....
     
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  3. rehab_sports_dr

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    > When a program say they have the "model" program for SCI or TBI or whatever;what exactly does that mean.

    This refers to multiple clinical centers that pool their demographic and outcome data to gain understanding about that care of spinal cord and brain injury patients

    The SCI model system webpage is http://www.ncddr.org/rpp/hf/hfdw/mscis/about.html

    The TBI model system webpage is
    http://www.tbindc.org/


    > These prgorams mention this accreditation status as I assume to sell their program. It sounds impressive, but I actually have not idea what that entails.


    It is one of many factors that speak to the quality of a program. Programs that participate in either or both of the model systems will have a strong infrastructure for monitioring their patient outcomes, and ususally have strong research programs in the areas of brain injury and spinal cord injury.

    It is questionable, however, how this directly reflects resident education and training. Few residents do much research on SCI and TBI outcomes, and in fact much of the research done at these programs is performed by PhDs affiliated with the programs and not by the clinicians themselves.

    It is true, though, that programs that have a model systems do have some committment to scholarship and research. There are many good programs, however, that are not model systems.

    My advice to medical students is that when evaluating programs, use the model system designation as one indicator of overall program quality (as is number of nationally prominent faculty, resident performance on the boards, number of residents presenting at national meetings, etc). But also make sure you look at those aspects of the program that specifically interest you. If you are interested in TBI or SCI research, then the model systems designation is important (although probably not as important as the presence of a fellowship), but otherwise it will probably have little direct effect on your training.
     

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