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Moving to a new state

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by N1DERL&, Apr 2, 2004.

  1. N1DERL&

    N1DERL& HP4!!!!
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    For all of you have moved to a new state, I had a bazillion questions... :D

    How did you find your apartment? Did you look in the classifieds or those books you find at the supermarket? Did you have the place ready before you arrived or did you find it after? How do you handle the application, etc if you haven't moved yet?

    Also, how does car insurance work? Do I just lose money on the insurance I've already paid for in my home state? Do I need to get a new policy in the new state?

    I've got more but don't want to overwhelm..

    I know... I'm pitiful... don't know much about moving far.. never had to do it before +pity+ I could use all the help I can get! :laugh:

    Thanks!
     
  2. Trekkie963

    Trekkie963 Senior Member
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    The internet is a great resource for finding apartments in distant locations. I have used www.rent.net quite a bit. I'd definitely try to have the apartment lined up before moving, unless you have like a family member or someone else you plan to crash with for 1-2 months. If you are uncomfortable committing to an apartment without seeing it, then it is worth a short trip to your new city in advance to check out housing and make a final decision. Depending on demand, you sometimes need to reserve apartments as much as sixty days before your intended move-in date.

    You can keep your car registered in your old state indefinitely, and keep the old car insurance. Whenever is convenient for you (like when your license plates are going to expire) you can go through all the paperwork of switching states. I never did this for the four years I spent in Texas. Now I am moving back to Cali and still have my Cali plates, driver's license, and insurance.
     
  3. kiernin

    kiernin Member
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    If you decide to register your car in your new state, just call your car insurance co and see if they offer coverage there. If they do, they can just update your policy with your new address. This will most likely result in a rate change. For example, my insurance went up when I moved from AZ to CA, and then went up again when I moved from the burbs into San Francisco. If your ins co doesn't offer coverage in your new state, you will have to find a new carrier. Shop around to find out who offers the most competitive rates. When you choose a new ins co, just call the old one and cancel your policy. They will refund the money for what's left of the 6-month term of the policy. You won't just lose the money.
    All though many people never bother to change their car registration/license etc, especially if you're only planning to be there temporarily, it may be necessary if you're trying to qualify as an in-state resident for tuition purposes in the future.
     
  4. XCanadianRagwee

    XCanadianRagwee Membership Revoked
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    I've moved to several different states. Here's what I did to look for an apartment (and I'll be doing this again very soon). First I looked on the web for apartmental rental webpages. Usually they will list you tons and tons of complexes. From that list, I wrote down about 20 possibilities (keep in mind the location where you want to live, and price). Next I flew to that city (this was a four day trip). The first full day, I went to all the apartments I had written down. At night I compiled all the info, and picked my top ones. I also looked at a renters guide book for the area (typically found at grocery stores and retail stores). I flipped through that to see if there were any last minute places I should check out. BY the end of the end of the night I had my top place, and a few other apartment places I wanted to check out from the renters guidebook. That afternoon, I told my top apt place I was moving in, and did the paperwork. The next two days, I toured the city.

    Relatively easy process, but you MUST have a method down before you go. And be patient witht he apt complexes, otherwise you're in for a longer day.


    Depends. If you are dependent, you still register the car in your former state. If you are independent you must register it in the new state (usually within 30 days). As for insurance, most big name companies have branches in all fifty states so you just transfer areas (which may increase or decrease your premiums).

    Hope this helps. Any other questions PM me.
     
  5. Sharkfan

    Sharkfan Senior Member
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    I will be moving into another state, but am familiar with the city I will be moving into. I got one of those grocery store books over Christmas break to familiarize myself with area apartment rates, and then looked on the internet. Once I found a place with good rates in an area I liked, I called them up, told them I was doing this from a distance, and asked what I should do. They sent me an application, then I filled it out and sent it back. I should hear from them next week whether or not I've been approved. (They weren't too crazy to hear that I wouldn't have any income other than financial aid, but said we could "work it out" if I would be able to pay them for 3-6 months at a time. No problem there, since my financial aid will come in a lump sum at the beginning of each semester.)

    I will be traveling there in two weeks to interview for a scholarship and summer job, and plan on visiting the complex to look at it and make sure everything seems in order.

    Now all I have to do is get there... ;)
     
  6. XCanadianRagwee

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    Rule #1: Never sign stuff until you or someone you trust has checked the place out...
     
  7. N1DERL&

    N1DERL& HP4!!!!
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    Thanks everyone for the great responses!! :clap: :clap:

    Sharkfan, how will you handle like the deposit and stuff?

    XCanadianRagwee, I'm not going to have a chance to take a trip like how you did and I saw your tip about not signing any papers. Can you think of anything I can do instead? Also, I am independent so I guess I'm changing the registration. Do I still have to do that even if I'm there for just a year and a half? And, do I lose my money for paying for my car's 2004 registration?

    Thank you all again! I'm feeling some of the stress going away!:D
     

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