Sep 5, 2017
2
6
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!
 

bel0780

2+ Year Member
Mar 25, 2016
10
1
Status
Pharmacy Student, Resident [Any Field], Pharmacist
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!
congratulation !!!thank you, for this good information , if you don't mind, do you have short note ?, i have two weeks for the exam, help please.....
 
About the Ads
Aug 19, 2017
4
3
Me, me, me! I'd love a copy of your notes to compare to mine! Thanks in advance! findlaypeople at gmail
 
Last edited:

bel0780

2+ Year Member
Mar 25, 2016
10
1
Status
Pharmacy Student, Resident [Any Field], Pharmacist
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!
Pass naplex Now for sale with one year online subscription, and complete pronto pass combo
 
Jul 9, 2017
5
1
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!

Congratulations! Was rxprep enough for compounding and calculations or did you use other study resources? Thank you!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Zerodose82
May 13, 2017
11
7
Hello everybody,

I came to this forum before i take my NAPLEX last month. It was very helpful. I copied the information and kept is as a document to look at it from time to time before the exam. Many thanks to everyone who I had copied his/her post. In fact, these posts were like my blue print. Bolded items are made by me before the exam, and if its red that means I had it in mine too. Again, these are other posters words not mine. All credit goes to them.
  • 1/3 of the exam was math calculations. More than half of the math calculations were fill in the blank. They were either similar questions from Rxprep or incorporated into your patient case. They provide the lab values for you but most of the ABG questions did provide the reference value except for two questions.
  • I had a lot of oncology questions. They only asked about the general chemo drugs and did not ask any monoclonal or TKIs. Know main side effects and calculation with BSA. They used the generic name for the chemo drug. Some patient cases may already provide you the BSA.
  • I had <5 total questions on HIV and hepatitis. Know the specific drug class within the combination drugs.
  • I had a lot of psych and neuro questions, maybe about 20 questions total (bipolar, schizophrenia, seizure, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer).
  • Make sure to always know the alternative recommended regimen for ID and OIs! The patient is always going to have a PCN allergy or QTc prolongation.
  • Of course, know your biostat, drug references and compounding chapters inside out. There were at least 20 questions from those three chapters.
- Know your math like the back of your hand. If you don't know your math, postpone the test, period.
- Just like the NABP indicates, the top 200 drugs should be sufficient.

Usually I would start out each day with an hour of calculations and then the rest of the day was spent reading the rxprep chapters. More time on the big topic chapters like DM, HTN, HIV, Oncology, and especially ID.

The week before my exam date, i spent the days just re-reading those big chapters and reviewing the notecards that I had made. The rxprep bank had 5 calculation quizzes that were 30-50 questions long so i usually did 1 quiz each day first thing in the morning before anything. Also very important to review the non-sterile and sterile compounding and the reference chapter. I think the RXprep quizzes helped me a lot with those questions on the exam as well.

If you don't have time to go through the whole rxprep book I would suggest at least going over the following chapters:
INFECTIOUS DISEASE, ONCOLOGY, DM, HIV, HTN, IMMUNIZATION, PSYCH CHAPTERS, AND ANTICOAG
MUST REVIEW: CALCULATIONS!!!!, NS/S COMPOUNDING

I didnt had time to memories even top 200 brand-generic, but I tried to remember THE BRAND GENERIC for ID,DM, HTN, and the DRUGS THAT HAVE MAJOR DG-DG INTERACTION.

The other problem i had was i WAS LITTLE IMPATIENT AND RUSHING THROUGH THE QUESTION and missing on the details of question like lab value, pt allergy etc. so on exam I made sure that i am reading the question properly and then tried to find any lab value or any condition that patient had that can affect the treatment choice or anything that is asked in the question.


Now back to my exam:

I finished before 12 min, skipped 2 calculation questions because it was taking time. Took two 10 min breaks. I asked for a calculator and they gave me one. Before the start i tried the on-screen computer and couldn't manage to get the exp/log/lin work, thanks God i didn't have to do such calculations.
So its about: Oncology, Calculations, ID, Compounding, References, Immunization, Calcium/Phenytoin correction, TBW/IBW/AdjBW, even body weights in ounces. Please don't rush and read carefully through every single question. I missed about two; one because I used TBW instead IBW and was clearly stated to use IBW. Scroll all the way down through the profile you might find a medication given to the patient and is not in the list of medications.

By the way, I am a foreign graduate (1993). Now I am looking for materials for FL MPJE please.

Good luck everybody.
 
About the Ads

links615

5+ Year Member
Jan 6, 2012
55
4
Status
Pharmacist
Hello everybody,

I came to this forum before i take my NAPLEX last month. It was very helpful. I copied the information and kept is as a document to look at it from time to time before the exam. Many thanks to everyone who I had copied his/her post. In fact, these posts were like my blue print. Bolded items are made by me before the exam, and if its red that means I had it in mine too. Again, these are other posters words not mine. All credit goes to them.
  • 1/3 of the exam was math calculations. More than half of the math calculations were fill in the blank. They were either similar questions from Rxprep or incorporated into your patient case. They provide the lab values for you but most of the ABG questions did provide the reference value except for two questions.
  • I had a lot of oncology questions. They only asked about the general chemo drugs and did not ask any monoclonal or TKIs. Know main side effects and calculation with BSA. They used the generic name for the chemo drug. Some patient cases may already provide you the BSA.
  • I had <5 total questions on HIV and hepatitis. Know the specific drug class within the combination drugs.
  • I had a lot of psych and neuro questions, maybe about 20 questions total (bipolar, schizophrenia, seizure, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer).
  • Make sure to always know the alternative recommended regimen for ID and OIs! The patient is always going to have a PCN allergy or QTc prolongation.
  • Of course, know your biostat, drug references and compounding chapters inside out. There were at least 20 questions from those three chapters.
- Know your math like the back of your hand. If you don't know your math, postpone the test, period.
- Just like the NABP indicates, the top 200 drugs should be sufficient.

Usually I would start out each day with an hour of calculations and then the rest of the day was spent reading the rxprep chapters. More time on the big topic chapters like DM, HTN, HIV, Oncology, and especially ID.

The week before my exam date, i spent the days just re-reading those big chapters and reviewing the notecards that I had made. The rxprep bank had 5 calculation quizzes that were 30-50 questions long so i usually did 1 quiz each day first thing in the morning before anything. Also very important to review the non-sterile and sterile compounding and the reference chapter. I think the RXprep quizzes helped me a lot with those questions on the exam as well.

If you don't have time to go through the whole rxprep book I would suggest at least going over the following chapters:
INFECTIOUS DISEASE, ONCOLOGY, DM, HIV, HTN, IMMUNIZATION, PSYCH CHAPTERS, AND ANTICOAG
MUST REVIEW: CALCULATIONS!!!!, NS/S COMPOUNDING

I didnt had time to memories even top 200 brand-generic, but I tried to remember THE BRAND GENERIC for ID,DM, HTN, and the DRUGS THAT HAVE MAJOR DG-DG INTERACTION.

The other problem i had was i WAS LITTLE IMPATIENT AND RUSHING THROUGH THE QUESTION and missing on the details of question like lab value, pt allergy etc. so on exam I made sure that i am reading the question properly and then tried to find any lab value or any condition that patient had that can affect the treatment choice or anything that is asked in the question.


Now back to my exam:

I finished before 12 min, skipped 2 calculation questions because it was taking time. Took two 10 min breaks. I asked for a calculator and they gave me one. Before the start i tried the on-screen computer and couldn't manage to get the exp/log/lin work, thanks God i didn't have to do such calculations.
So its about: Oncology, Calculations, ID, Compounding, References, Immunization, Calcium/Phenytoin correction, TBW/IBW/AdjBW, even body weights in ounces. Please don't rush and read carefully through every single question. I missed about two; one because I used TBW instead IBW and was clearly stated to use IBW. Scroll all the way down through the profile you might find a medication given to the patient and is not in the list of medications.

By the way, I am a foreign graduate (1993). Now I am looking for materials for FL MPJE please.

Good luck everybody.
Dirja, what types of materials do you use to study for the NAPLEX Exam Rxprep or PNN! Thanks
 

lnd19

2+ Year Member
Feb 19, 2016
3
0
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!

Hi,

Can you send a copy of your notes to me as well? My email is [email protected] Thank you!
 
Aug 20, 2017
4
0
Hello everybody,

I came to this forum before i take my NAPLEX last month. It was very helpful. I copied the information and kept is as a document to look at it from time to time before the exam. Many thanks to everyone who I had copied his/her post. In fact, these posts were like my blue print. Bolded items are made by me before the exam, and if its red that means I had it in mine too. Again, these are other posters words not mine. All credit goes to them.
  • 1/3 of the exam was math calculations. More than half of the math calculations were fill in the blank. They were either similar questions from Rxprep or incorporated into your patient case. They provide the lab values for you but most of the ABG questions did provide the reference value except for two questions.
  • I had a lot of oncology questions. They only asked about the general chemo drugs and did not ask any monoclonal or TKIs. Know main side effects and calculation with BSA. They used the generic name for the chemo drug. Some patient cases may already provide you the BSA.
  • I had <5 total questions on HIV and hepatitis. Know the specific drug class within the combination drugs.
  • I had a lot of psych and neuro questions, maybe about 20 questions total (bipolar, schizophrenia, seizure, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer).
  • Make sure to always know the alternative recommended regimen for ID and OIs! The patient is always going to have a PCN allergy or QTc prolongation.
  • Of course, know your biostat, drug references and compounding chapters inside out. There were at least 20 questions from those three chapters.
- Know your math like the back of your hand. If you don't know your math, postpone the test, period.
- Just like the NABP indicates, the top 200 drugs should be sufficient.

Usually I would start out each day with an hour of calculations and then the rest of the day was spent reading the rxprep chapters. More time on the big topic chapters like DM, HTN, HIV, Oncology, and especially ID.

The week before my exam date, i spent the days just re-reading those big chapters and reviewing the notecards that I had made. The rxprep bank had 5 calculation quizzes that were 30-50 questions long so i usually did 1 quiz each day first thing in the morning before anything. Also very important to review the non-sterile and sterile compounding and the reference chapter. I think the RXprep quizzes helped me a lot with those questions on the exam as well.

If you don't have time to go through the whole rxprep book I would suggest at least going over the following chapters:
INFECTIOUS DISEASE, ONCOLOGY, DM, HIV, HTN, IMMUNIZATION, PSYCH CHAPTERS, AND ANTICOAG
MUST REVIEW: CALCULATIONS!!!!, NS/S COMPOUNDING

I didnt had time to memories even top 200 brand-generic, but I tried to remember THE BRAND GENERIC for ID,DM, HTN, and the DRUGS THAT HAVE MAJOR DG-DG INTERACTION.

The other problem i had was i WAS LITTLE IMPATIENT AND RUSHING THROUGH THE QUESTION and missing on the details of question like lab value, pt allergy etc. so on exam I made sure that i am reading the question properly and then tried to find any lab value or any condition that patient had that can affect the treatment choice or anything that is asked in the question.


Now back to my exam:

I finished before 12 min, skipped 2 calculation questions because it was taking time. Took two 10 min breaks. I asked for a calculator and they gave me one. Before the start i tried the on-screen computer and couldn't manage to get the exp/log/lin work, thanks God i didn't have to do such calculations.
So its about: Oncology, Calculations, ID, Compounding, References, Immunization, Calcium/Phenytoin correction, TBW/IBW/AdjBW, even body weights in ounces. Please don't rush and read carefully through every single question. I missed about two; one because I used TBW instead IBW and was clearly stated to use IBW. Scroll all the way down through the profile you might find a medication given to the patient and is not in the list of medications.

By the way, I am a foreign graduate (1993). Now I am looking for materials for FL MPJE please.

Good luck everybody.
 
Aug 20, 2017
4
0
HI DIRJA,

Thanks for the information on the naplex and where to keep my main focus. Could you please also share any notes you might have to faithandlove_4me @ Yahoo. Thanks in advance.
 
May 13, 2017
11
7
Hi Blessed,
Your focus should be on the red marks on the post. I used RxPrep exclusively and still have more than 80 days online access to 2018 videos and questions and 2017 Book if interested.
 
Nov 25, 2017
6
0
Status
Pharmacist
Hello everybody,

I came to this forum before i take my NAPLEX last month. It was very helpful. I copied the information and kept is as a document to look at it from time to time before the exam. Many thanks to everyone who I had copied his/her post. In fact, these posts were like my blue print. Bolded items are made by me before the exam, and if its red that means I had it in mine too. Again, these are other posters words not mine. All credit goes to them.
  • 1/3 of the exam was math calculations. More than half of the math calculations were fill in the blank. They were either similar questions from Rxprep or incorporated into your patient case. They provide the lab values for you but most of the ABG questions did provide the reference value except for two questions.
  • I had a lot of oncology questions. They only asked about the general chemo drugs and did not ask any monoclonal or TKIs. Know main side effects and calculation with BSA. They used the generic name for the chemo drug. Some patient cases may already provide you the BSA.
  • I had <5 total questions on HIV and hepatitis. Know the specific drug class within the combination drugs.
  • I had a lot of psych and neuro questions, maybe about 20 questions total (bipolar, schizophrenia, seizure, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer).
  • Make sure to always know the alternative recommended regimen for ID and OIs! The patient is always going to have a PCN allergy or QTc prolongation.
  • Of course, know your biostat, drug references and compounding chapters inside out. There were at least 20 questions from those three chapters.
- Know your math like the back of your hand. If you don't know your math, postpone the test, period.
- Just like the NABP indicates, the top 200 drugs should be sufficient.

Usually I would start out each day with an hour of calculations and then the rest of the day was spent reading the rxprep chapters. More time on the big topic chapters like DM, HTN, HIV, Oncology, and especially ID.

The week before my exam date, i spent the days just re-reading those big chapters and reviewing the notecards that I had made. The rxprep bank had 5 calculation quizzes that were 30-50 questions long so i usually did 1 quiz each day first thing in the morning before anything. Also very important to review the non-sterile and sterile compounding and the reference chapter. I think the RXprep quizzes helped me a lot with those questions on the exam as well.

If you don't have time to go through the whole rxprep book I would suggest at least going over the following chapters:
INFECTIOUS DISEASE, ONCOLOGY, DM, HIV, HTN, IMMUNIZATION, PSYCH CHAPTERS, AND ANTICOAG
MUST REVIEW: CALCULATIONS!!!!, NS/S COMPOUNDING

I didnt had time to memories even top 200 brand-generic, but I tried to remember THE BRAND GENERIC for ID,DM, HTN, and the DRUGS THAT HAVE MAJOR DG-DG INTERACTION.

The other problem i had was i WAS LITTLE IMPATIENT AND RUSHING THROUGH THE QUESTION and missing on the details of question like lab value, pt allergy etc. so on exam I made sure that i am reading the question properly and then tried to find any lab value or any condition that patient had that can affect the treatment choice or anything that is asked in the question.


Now back to my exam:

I finished before 12 min, skipped 2 calculation questions because it was taking time. Took two 10 min breaks. I asked for a calculator and they gave me one. Before the start i tried the on-screen computer and couldn't manage to get the exp/log/lin work, thanks God i didn't have to do such calculations.
So its about: Oncology, Calculations, ID, Compounding, References, Immunization, Calcium/Phenytoin correction, TBW/IBW/AdjBW, even body weights in ounces. Please don't rush and read carefully through every single question. I missed about two; one because I used TBW instead IBW and was clearly stated to use IBW. Scroll all the way down through the profile you might find a medication given to the patient and is not in the list of medications.

By the way, I am a foreign graduate (1993). Now I am looking for materials for FL MPJE please.

Good luck everybody.
Follow this advice the you are certainly on the right track, but keep in mind that this exam touches on alittle bit of everything :)
 

Solom

2+ Year Member
Oct 7, 2016
1
0
Status
Pharmacist
Hi,
I used RxPrep exclusively and still have more than 80 days online access to 2018 videos and questions and 2017 Book if interested.
Hi I’m taking NAPLEX for the second time and in 2weeks & interested in the lectures can you please pm me or email me eslamgabersaid (at ) gmail

Thanks in Advance.
 
Dec 4, 2017
1
0
Status
Pharmacist
Hello all! I do not usually make posts on online forums, but I found the SDN NAPLEX threads to be EXTREMELY helpful in preparation for my exam. Just found out today that I passed my NAPLEX on the first try after a couple months of worried studying and procrastination and thought I'd try to give back to the community in some small way.

Some background on me: I was an average student. Nowhere near straight A's. Studied for therapeutics exams the day before and usually ended up somewhere in the high-C to mid-B range. Retained very little long-term...
Worked in community pharmacy for one year (weekends mostly) and hospital pharmacy two years (weekends and one day per week every other week).

I mostly wanted to write this post to encourage anyone with severe anxiety leading up to the exam. Throughout the summer, I was very worried about taking an exam I'd seen REALLY good students fail or say was super hard. I gave myself all the time in the world to study, but didn't feel like I would ever be able to tackle the exam with confidence. But after taking the exam, I feel like I could have gone in with a lot more confidence or a more useful study strategy knowing what was ahead.

They say the exam is meant to test minimum competency. This is true. This does not mean that the questions are extremely basic. You will be asked straightforward questions from a wide variety of topics. I had no experience taking the adaptive form of the exam, but IMHO this format is much better suited for testing your ability to function as a practicing pharmacist. It seems to me to be a very practical assessment of how well suited you are to field questions from patients and prescribers. At a 6-hour run-time, I would characterize the exam as what you might expect from a "pretty busy" day answering questions as a real pharmacist. It feels in some way like a simulation of a real shift. With that in mind, I would encourage everyone to go in with the mindset that it will be a somewhat difficult day, but it is nothing you can't handle. All you can really do is try your best and think critically and practically about every question that comes up. If you survived the pharmacy curriculum and rotations, you should have all the skills and experience necessary to pass this exam.

Exam Specifics: It is said on here frequently and it is most definitely true - KNOW YOUR CALCULATIONS. I studied RXPrep calculations the night before and that was more than enough for me. Some of the RXPrep calculations are most likely outside what you might need to know for daily functioning, but if you can imagine having to answer it in practice, there's a good chance it will be on the exam. Obviously flow rates are important to know. As well as TPN calories/g or mL, CrCl, IBW, Corrected Phenytoin/Ca, mEqs, mmoles, etc... I spent a little TOO much time studying the ones you really don't use that often. BEE, pH, E values... But it is important to be able to perform them quickly and accurately.

Topics? It's hard to say. It really is all over the place. I was worried about getting questions on some topics in similar depth to a class exam. You most likely will not. The questions are not meant to trick you. It seemed to me that many could be answered by simply being familiar with treatments, side effects, interactions, etc. I bought the RXPrep question bank and, while it is very good practice, the questions are much more difficult than those on the exam. I would buy them again though for the peace of mind. If you can answer those with reasonable success, your knowledge base is likely well-enough developed for exam purposes. I took ID/ONC/HIV quizzes over and over. The others, I'd skim through. If I could get 50-60% on a topic without reviewing it right before, I'd consider that proficient enough for the exam.

ID was a pretty good chunk of my therapeutics-based questions, but they weren't particularly difficult. Know general coverage of ABX, and first line/second line options for some of the major/common disease states (be aware of patient allergies when taking the exam!). OM, HAP, CAP, SSTI, OIs, and STDs are the only ones I "really" felt confident about, and that was enough.

Know brand names of the top 2-300. HIV branded combos, HTN branded combos, etc. I would say the majority of drugs are referred to by their generic names on the exam.

All in all, I probably studied <150 hours total over 2 months - the bulk of which happened in the last week before the exam (8 hours/day the last 5 days). I typed notes over the first few chapters through ID, and I would say that helped, but it would be exhausting to do that for the whole book. Compounding questions can be tough regardless of how well you know it, but mine were relatively basic. RXPrep's biostats chapter is a good resource for basic competency - know RR, ARR, NNT and interpretation of results. Quick shout out of some other big topics: Resources, Immunizations, DM, HTN, Asthma/COPD, Thyroid, etc....

I would recommend taking the Pre-NAPLEX if you are considering it as it can be a confidence booster. I took it twice. Once three days before, once the day before - I know, not how it's meant to be used, but the second time really helped me feel ready for the exam.


If anyone has any questions, please let me know! This exam is "tough" but not hard. The questions are not "easy", but they are simple and straightforward for the most part. Some of the exam could be considered "luck-based" dependent on whether or not you've had experience with an oddball topic or had to look up a strange word on rotations. Work experience will help quite a bit in my opinion. If you failed the exam, DON'T DESPAIR! If you passed pharmacy school, YOU CAN DO THIS! Study the basics, and go in with confidence and under the assumption that you will be tested on a very wide variety of MOSTLY practical topics.

Hope this helped and GOOD LUCK TO ALL THE TEST-TAKERS! One last hurdle before achieving your dream!
 
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