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Navy GMO seeking civilian FM residency

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bricktamland

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After having paid back my AD obligation as a 3-year GMO, I'll be separating from the Navy in July 2008 :D. I'm currently working with the Marines, and recently extended for an extra year after a 2-year stint with an infantry battalion. I have an FM internship under my belt and I'm planning to continue with FM at a civilian residency. Preferably, I'd like to find an open PGY-2 position at a good program (starting in '08) versus repeating internship (though I'm open to repeating internship if the only open PGY-2 spots are at less-than-desirable programs). I was hoping there might be someone in this community who may have faced a similar dilemma and could provide some recommendations/suggestions. Specifically:

1. After a lengthy interuption in residency training (for me 3 years), were programs hesitant to accept you as a PGY-2?
2. Has a GMO experience been looked upon in a positive light by civilian programs?
3. Have programs been concerned about or have you experienced discrimination due to the remaining IRR (individual ready reserve) commitment stipulated in the HPSP contract?
4. Has anyone tried using the AAMC's "Find-a-Resident" after their GMO period?

Thanks.

BTW, if any one here is searching for information about Navy GMO experiences, I would be happy to bear witness. I consider myself a fairly objective person in that regard, and can muster up a few pros in addition to the standard list of cons :laugh:. Though military medicine is decidedly not for me, I have truly had some very good times as a GMO and I don't regret it (I also have my fair share of horror stories:eek:).
 

FL350

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I know in some cases FP residencies will give you all or partial credit for your PGY 1 year after internship year + GMO experience. I know of one former GMO who had completed a military surgery internship year and who was promoted to PGY 2 after a couple of months as a PGY 1 in a civilian FP program. I would contact programs you are interested in directly ask how they handle this situation.
 

IgD

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I would say apply to the best programs in the states. Contact the program directors, explain your situation and ask if they would consider you for a position. Being a GMO will make you look like a super star since you will be seen as an experienced more mature physician with leadership skills. Make your GI bill benefits are maxxed out because you can cash them for internship/residency.
 

BomberDoc

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1. After a lengthy interuption in residency training (for me 3 years), were programs hesitant to accept you as a PGY-2?
2. Has a GMO experience been looked upon in a positive light by civilian programs?
3. Have programs been concerned about or have you experienced discrimination due to the remaining IRR (individual ready reserve) commitment stipulated in the HPSP contract?
4. Has anyone tried using the AAMC's "Find-a-Resident" after their GMO period?

I am finishing the last year of a 4 year GMO Flight Surgeon tour and heading off to civilian residency in July 2008.

1+2. Every program I interviewed at looked at my GMO time in a very positive way. There was no hesitation on the part of the programs to start at PGY-2 after having previously completed internship. Your experience will blow away those who are coming fresh out of med school. This sets you very much apart from 95% of applicants which gives you good exposure. You will be viewed as more mature and developed as a physician who has been out in the world practicing.

3. Some programs asked about this but there was no overt discrimination in my experience. They know that IRR callback is extremely unlikely as it hasn't ever happened in the past.

4. No. I went through the regular match. It has its flaws, but is enormously more fair than the military GME board. Here, your board scores and recommendations actually matter.

Milmed sucks but having survived it does give you a leg up on the traditional residency applicants. Absolutely apply to the top programs. You will likely have them competing over who gets to match you.
 

i want out

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After having paid back my AD obligation as a 3-year GMO, I'll be separating from the Navy in July 2008 :D. I'm currently working with the Marines, and recently extended for an extra year after a 2-year stint with an infantry battalion. I have an FM internship under my belt and I'm planning to continue with FM at a civilian residency. Preferably, I'd like to find an open PGY-2 position at a good program (starting in '08) versus repeating internship (though I'm open to repeating internship if the only open PGY-2 spots are at less-than-desirable programs). I was hoping there might be someone in this community who may have faced a similar dilemma and could provide some recommendations/suggestions. Specifically:

1. After a lengthy interuption in residency training (for me 3 years), were programs hesitant to accept you as a PGY-2?
2. Has a GMO experience been looked upon in a positive light by civilian programs?
3. Have programs been concerned about or have you experienced discrimination due to the remaining IRR (individual ready reserve) commitment stipulated in the HPSP contract?
4. Has anyone tried using the AAMC's "Find-a-Resident" after their GMO period?

Thanks.

BTW, if any one here is searching for information about Navy GMO experiences, I would be happy to bear witness. I consider myself a fairly objective person in that regard, and can muster up a few pros in addition to the standard list of cons :laugh:. Though military medicine is decidedly not for me, I have truly had some very good times as a GMO and I don't regret it (I also have my fair share of horror stories:eek:).

If you wanted to do something like Derm, EM, that is fairly competitive, you might have trouble.

But look at this from a program directors standpoint.

You did and FP internship, (already approved by accrediting agency). You then went and practiced primary care medicine for 3 years.

Your going to be head and shoulders above most everybody applying for FP.

also don't discount the added benefit of being an 'attending' for 3 years.
You may feel like your in over your head as a GMO, but your truly developing a feel for how to make real world decisions that they just can't teach in school. This is one of the intangibles that will make program directors want you.

Shotgun out letters to every program that you would consider, and ask about spots outside the match. (worked for me).

i want out
 

IgD

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I would not recommend "shotgunning" out letters especially for competitive programs. I would contact the program directors by phone. It is much more personal.
 

bricktamland

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Thanks for all your responses.

I absolutely agree that my time as a GMO has greatly improved my abilities as a doctor. Though a small hunk of knowledge base may have dwindled due to the select population of patients I see (mostly male teens and 20-somethings), it is vastly outweighed by the maturity and confidence I have gained by working independently so soon after internship. In fact, I am very excited to return to academic medicine with the renewed perspective I've gained after functioning essentially as an Primary Care attending. My main concern is how well civilian programs will perceive this GMO experience--though I will certainly do my best to help them understand via personal statement and the interviews.


BomberDoc: I'm assuming that since you've already interviewed for 2008 spots, you applied last year through the ERAS? Or am I incorrect? Any tips for interviews?

Here is my plan: I'll be applying through ERAS for PGY-1 spots as a backup. However, my ideal goal is to contact programs directly and advertise myself for any open PGY-2 positions (those that have been vacated for whatever reason--people switching to other residencies, people with personal issues, pregnancy, etc.). I've contacted a few programs already and they say to call back in late winter/early spring, when they'll have a better idea of which interns might be leaving or staying. Does anyone perceive any flaws in this logic?
 

bricktamland

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IgD: I definitely agree about contacting the programs via phone vs sending out letters. I've even considered arranging an in person visit to the programs (after confirming with the secretary first, of course). Do you think that would be too forward?
 

Out in 2008

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I had a fellow GMO here who got out a couple of summers ago and she started as PGY -2 at a local FP program. She did this outside the match via cold contacts/interviews.

I'm going to train in EM, so I'll tell you what I know about that. SAEM has a "residents wanted" website where prorams are looking to fill vacant PGY 2-4spots. AAFP might have a similar website. If you do go through the match, at your new program, ask for a waiver for a portion of your internship, so you can advance more quickly to PGY2. In EM this is done after you start in the program and your program applies to the ABEM. It's usually maxes out at 6 months and is rarely more than 2-3 months, but every little bit helps. Asking about this during interviews might also help you decide on a program based on the director's willingness to work with you.

Good luck Devil Dog!
 

BomberDoc

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I'm assuming that since you've already interviewed for 2008 spots, you applied last year through the ERAS? Or am I incorrect? Any tips for interviews?

Yes, I applied through ERAS last year for a PGY-2 starting in July 2008. Some specialties require an internship and match separately for the rest of the residency.

Talk up your experience in the military that is different from the standard civilian experience. I'm sure you have deployed and that will give you a huge supply of good stories to tell. The program directors and other attendings will want to hear about some of the wild and crazy s#hit that you've done, cool things you learned, making due without supplies while several hours away from help, etc. This is how you show how much you've grown and matured as a result of the military experience. Cast it in a positive light and don't mention any of the headaches that accompany milmed.

It is simply a matter of being an engaging conversationalist and they will see what you can bring to the table. Of course if it is a group interview or while at lunch with the residents, be wary of talking too much and dominating the conversation. Yes, people are going to be interested in what you have to say, but there is a fine line between being talkative and being pushy. Be positive and energetic no matter how tired you are from taking the redeye flight. At lunch/dinner with the residents when they say it is 'off the record,' you are still under the microscope. The program directors will ask the residents who they liked and who they didn't. This has pretty significant weight. That being said, don't be afraid to have ONE beer and show that you can relax and are a decent person to hang out with. They are looking for residents to learn and work, but also they want someone who is cool and fun to spend time with for the next few years.

Good luck. Kick a$$.
 

bricktamland

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Out In 2008: I hadn't thought about requesting a "waiver" for a portion of internship. . . . that's not a bad idea! I will definitely look into that, thanks.

BomberDoc: thanks for the interview tips. If offered some drinks, I'll try not to have TOO many :cool: . . . . though I do love the beer. . . .

Regarding the GI Bill, has anyone had any trouble arranging for it to be applied for residency? I'll be submitting my payment for the "kicker" soon.

Also, has anyone here used a VA home loan?
 

Out in 2008

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Out In 2008: I hadn't thought about requesting a "waiver" for a portion of internship. . . . that's not a bad idea! I will definitely look into that, thanks.

BomberDoc: thanks for the interview tips. If offered some drinks, I'll try not to have TOO many :cool: . . . . though I do love the beer. . . .

Regarding the GI Bill, has anyone had any trouble arranging for it to be applied for residency? I'll be submitting my payment for the "kicker" soon.

Also, has anyone here used a VA home loan?


I used a VA loan a few years ago to buy my first house. There are some benefits in that you can buy without a down payment, no mortgage insurance required. It does have some drawbacks in that it limits you to a conventional loan and there is a cap on loan amount, somehere around 200K. Of course there is also additional paperwork involved. If you have a down payment saved up, you might be better off without the VA. I did a standard ARM without the VA guaranty after selling the first house.
 

medivac

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I'm a PGY2 in an EM program after my Navy FS stint. The GI bill is fantastic. As others have said, make sure you max out--put in for the additional kicker. I now get just under $1200 each month. The GME office signs off on your paperwork, and the money is direct deposited into your bank account.

I only had one program with one interviewer who was at all negative about my navy time. All of the other programs were very happy to have a more mature applicant (age and experience wise...I can't vouch for my emotional maturity!). I matched at my first choice, as did one of my classmates who was also a navy FS.

I chose to re-do my intern year as most EM programs are 1-3, and I felt I needed the additional critical care rotations to get back up to speed. I have no regrets about doing internship twice.

If you have any questions, PM me!
 

bricktamland

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Medivac: congrats on matching at your first choice. As far as repeating an FM internship. . . . I'd be happy either way. My Navy FM intership was very heavy on OB and light on IM, which is the opposite of my preferences. I would definitely benefit from the extra training should I end up with PGY-1. In fact, I'm almost convinced that's the way to go. . . .
 

ProwlerturnGas

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Brick,
I did my PGY-1 year at Bremerton and then did 5 years as a Flight Surgeon. I am now in my final year as an Anesthesia resident.

The VA makes applying for the GI bill pretty easy, however, it can take awhile to actually see money. You need to contact the GME director of your intended program and you will need to fill out a VA form 22-1990. This form confirms your "enrollment" in the program. Do not fill in the OJT portion of the form, as you are technically a student.

My transition into civilian medicine was pretty easy as well. Every program but one was interested and thought the Navy time was a plus.

I would guess you should get partial if not total credit for your internship. If not, ask about being a resitern, placing you off cycle to graduate in July, but not needing to repeat a whole internship.
 

riversoul

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After having paid back my AD obligation as a 3-year GMO, I'll be separating from the Navy in July 2008 :D. I'm currently working with the Marines, and recently extended for an extra year after a 2-year stint with an infantry battalion. I have an FM internship under my belt and I'm planning to continue with FM at a civilian residency. Preferably, I'd like to find an open PGY-2 position at a good program (starting in '08) versus repeating internship (though I'm open to repeating internship if the only open PGY-2 spots are at less-than-desirable programs). I was hoping there might be someone in this community who may have faced a similar dilemma and could provide some recommendations/suggestions. Specifically:

1. After a lengthy interuption in residency training (for me 3 years), were programs hesitant to accept you as a PGY-2?
2. Has a GMO experience been looked upon in a positive light by civilian programs?
3. Have programs been concerned about or have you experienced discrimination due to the remaining IRR (individual ready reserve) commitment stipulated in the HPSP contract?
4. Has anyone tried using the AAMC's "Find-a-Resident" after their GMO period?

Thanks.

BTW, if any one here is searching for information about Navy GMO experiences, I would be happy to bear witness. I consider myself a fairly objective person in that regard, and can muster up a few pros in addition to the standard list of cons :laugh:. Though military medicine is decidedly not for me, I have truly had some very good times as a GMO and I don't regret it (I also have my fair share of horror stories:eek:).

Hi bricktamland, I was hoping you could answer my questions about the Navy GMO. I know I may be thinking too far ahead, as I am 22 y/o, just graduated from college, and currently applying to med school (received only 1 interview so far). The info i'm requesting may perhaps help with potential interview questions such as "Where do you see yourself 10 years from now?" and "How do you plan to pay off your loans?"

As for my background, I have been reading over the military med forum for a while now, and am interested in obtaining some medical experience in the military. My grandpa and two uncles were in the Navy, and my Dad was in the Air Force, and their experiences have been mostly positive, although they were not involved in military medicine. If my grandpa had not joined the Navy in the Philippines and started a family here in the US, who knows where I would be right now.

Anyways, here are my questions:
1) How did you get your 3 yr GMO? Was it through HPSP? And are there varying years of HPSP, i.e. 2,3, or 4 year HPSP contracts?


2) Do you think it would be wise to intentionally go for a 3-4 yr GMO to get more real-world experience, explore the world when you're younger, serve the U.S, and mature more in order to be a better applicant for a civilian residency? Or do you think it's better to avoid the military altogether and just apply for civilian residencies fresh out of medical school? From reading this thread and others, it seems like civilian residencies look favorably on candidates with prior military experience.

3) Also, is the 3-4 yr GMO followed by civilian residency route better than doing a military residency and then paying back HPSP years afterwards? What's the likelihood of doing the former route (which is what I pointed out in question #2 and is what I think you are doing)?

4) what specific enjoyable things did you do as a Navy GMO?

Assuming a med school acceptance & graduation, I would be 27 when I graduate from med school. At that point of my life, I don't see myself being married (although i know things could change in school), nor having kids anytime soon.

I've lived in California for the past 15 years of my life, and haven't really visited other parts of the world (except one trip to the Philippines in 1999). Admittedly, by being in Cali, especially socal, I've been living a pretty sheltered life and want to experience new locales, lifestyles, etc. These are some of the factors that are currently driving me to pursue a stint in the military. There's also a financial factor involved (assuming I pursue and actually obtain a military scholarship), as I don't want to be so massively in debt after med school, especially if I attend a private university and/or OOS. Being a CA resident, this scenario is very likely.

5) I've seen all the "Don't join military medicine for the money" posts, but do you think the financial benefits you've received have been worth it? And do you think FAP is a better alternative?

6) If you could go back in time, would you do a GMO again?

7) Why NAVY GMO and not AF or Army? Do those other departments even have GMO's?

Sorry that there are so many questions but if you, or anyone else familiar with the above topics could answer them, i would really appreciate it!
 

bricktamland

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Hi bricktamland, I was hoping you could answer my questions about the Navy GMO. I know I may be thinking too far ahead, as I am 22 y/o, just graduated from college, and currently applying to med school (received only 1 interview so far). The info i'm requesting may perhaps help with potential interview questions such as "Where do you see yourself 10 years from now?" and "How do you plan to pay off your loans?"


Sorry that there are so many questions but if you, or anyone else familiar with the above topics could answer them, i would really appreciate it!

As for my background, I have been reading over the military med forum for a while now, and am interested in obtaining some medical experience in the military. My grandpa and two uncles were in the Navy, and my Dad was in the Air Force, and their experiences have been mostly positive, although they were not involved in military medicine. If my grandpa had not joined the Navy in the Philippines and started a family here in the US, who knows where I would be right now.

Riversoul,

It's wise that you're trying to gather as much info as you can. Signing a contract with the military is a HUGE decision. I have to confess to being one of the many people who didn't do enough research before putting my name on that dotted line. All things considered, I've had a pretty good time as a GMO but I am very ready to move on. Before I ramble on too much, I'll try to answer your specific questions.


Anyways, here are my questions:
1) How did you get your 3 yr GMO? Was it through HPSP? And are there varying years of HPSP, i.e. 2,3, or 4 year HPSP contracts?


Yes I took a 3 year HPSP scholarship. It's probably the better option if your intention is to get out of the military as a GMO. It's a TERRIBLE option if you're considering doing a military residency. You basically get screwed out of an entire year of tuition.

There are different contracts out there. A GMO I worked with had a 2 year contract, but those are less common. The most common are 4 year contracts. Be very careful with a 2 year contact because I believe the minimum payback is 3 years, however intership will count for 1 year in this particular circumstance (it won't for the 3 and 4 year contracts, though). That means if you do a civilian internship, you'll end up owing 3 years active duty for your 2 year contract. It's all super complicated so you really need to understand the small print of each contract.


2) Do you think it would be wise to intentionally go for a 3-4 yr GMO to get more real-world experience, explore the world when you're younger, serve the U.S, and mature more in order to be a better applicant for a civilian residency? Or do you think it's better to avoid the military altogether and just apply for civilian residencies fresh out of medical school? From reading this thread and others, it seems like civilian residencies look favorably on candidates with prior military experience.

Yes and no. First of all, if you think joining the military is going to help you "explore the world," then you've totally bought into their propaganda. If you really feel the need to travel and see the world, then take a year off before medical school and do some backpacking, or join the Peace Corps or something. The military, in my experience, is not a very fruitful way to experience the world.

I got to know a couple tiny patches of barren desert in Iraq really really well for 7 months. I don't know about you, but I don't consider that "exploring the world." It's true that some doctors in the Navy actually spend some time on ships (imagine that!), but even then, do you really think a few brief days at a Port of Call, getting drunk at some touristy bar is a great way to experience new and different cultures? (though it probably is fun) Also, don't believe the lies about the cool overseas clinics, those jobs go to doctors that have been in forever, not to brand new GMOs. As a newbie, you'll end up getting the crappiest billets, especially if you're male and single.

That being said, I do feel proud to say I've served my country (though I'll keep my opinions about this war to myself). Cough, cough, friggin idiot warmonger Bush, cough, cough.

I totally agree that serving time as a GMO has matured me. When I graduated med school, I didn't truly understand what being a doctor was all about. Now, I do. In med school, you're forced to choose a specialty very early in your clinical career, before you thoroughly understand the ins and outs of that specialty. Some people had the benefit of having a mother or father or other family member who was a doctor, and thus had a good idea about what they wanted to do, probably before they even started med school. I wasn't one of those people. Now, having worked as a doctor for 3 years, I am just starting to realize what it is I really like about medicine. Maybe I'm a late bloomer, but I like to weigh all important decisions carefully. Just look at all the people who change specialties. I would much rather be a GMO, with the great hours and government holidays, trying to figure out what I really enjoy, then spending godawful hours slaving away in a residency program that I end up hating and have throw all that work away in order to apply for something else. Plus, you get paid a lot better as a GMO. So for me, as a person who was relatively undecided about a career path, GMO-land was the perfect fit. Best of all, I feel way more confident as a doctor.

It's better to avoid the military altogether if your goal is civilian residency and you know exactly what you want to do. As it's been said countless times before, as a strictly financial decision, it's a poor choice.

If you want to be a strong candidate for a competitive residency, then focus on getting good grades and scoring high on the USMLE tests. GMO experience may be looked upon favorably (I'll find out firsthand soon), but it's not going to be nearly as reliable as good evaluations and high board scores.



3) Also, is the 3-4 yr GMO followed by civilian residency route better than doing a military residency and then paying back HPSP years afterwards? What's the likelihood of doing the former route (which is what I pointed out in question #2 and is what I think you are doing)?


Going the GMO route wasn't really a choice for most of us, that's what we were ordered to do. However, looking at the grim future of Navy medicine, I'm happy to get out while I can. In the future, most GMO billets will be filled by doctors AFTER they graduate residency. It may be hard as a premed to understand this, but the GMO job--with some exceptions--is complete waste and underutilization of a board-certified doctor. In some instances, you'll see things like neonatal intensivists working as GMOs, it's absolutely insane.


4) what specific enjoyable things did you do as a Navy GMO?


Sometimes I have light work days that afford me time to work out, play baskeball, or go running during the day. I also enjoy government holidays (i.e. 4-day Labor Day weekends). To be quite honest, there isn't a whole lot about the job that is super enjoyable, most of the time it's pretty frustrating, so the large amount of time off is probably the best part. But I guess the people I work with--the Corpsmen and other GMOs--make it fun. Occasionally there's an interesting case. But whenever that happens, you have to send the guy to the hospital where all the cool stuff happens--surgeries, thoracentesis, MRI's, etc. As a GMO, you're stuck out in the boonies with a stethescope and a reflex hammer. You can't do anything cool because you simply don't have the facilities to support it. So you end up doing all the boring scut work, like physicals. Doing separation physicals all day long gets old--FAST!



Assuming a med school acceptance & graduation, I would be 27 when I graduate from med school. At that point of my life, I don't see myself being married (although i know things could change in school), nor having kids anytime soon.

I've lived in California for the past 15 years of my life, and haven't really visited other parts of the world (except one trip to the Philippines in 1999). Admittedly, by being in Cali, especially socal, I've been living a pretty sheltered life and want to experience new locales, lifestyles, etc. These are some of the factors that are currently driving me to pursue a stint in the military. There's also a financial factor involved (assuming I pursue and actually obtain a military scholarship), as I don't want to be so massively in debt after med school, especially if I attend a private university and/or OOS. Being a CA resident, this scenario is very likely.

5) I've seen all the "Don't join military medicine for the money" posts, but do you think the financial benefits you've received have been worth it? And do you think FAP is a better alternative?



Don't join military medicine for the money, Don't join military medicine for the money, Don't join military medicine for the money, Don't join military medicine for the money.

Do we have to beat it into your head!?!?!? It will not save you money in the long run. However. . . . it will afford you to have some fun NOW, in the short term. My wife and I got married this year. We had an awesome wedding and there was no way I could have paid for it with a resident's salary. We drive nice cars, we travel, we eat out at nice restaurants. I've started a retirement account. But my civilian buddy from med school is about to graduate from Anesthesiology this year. Sure, he's been living like a student since high school, but he's going to pass me up FAST!! He's looking at $300,000 and up starting. Do the math. If you totally hate deferred gratification, and you don't mind losing out some money later on, then maybe HPSP is for you. I don't know anything about FAP.


6) If you could go back in time, would you do a GMO again?

Yes. Only because I met my wife this way and because living in SoCal has been awesome. Also, as I said before, it provided a break from postgraduate training while I figured out what I really want to do in life. Otherwise, it was a pretty stupid decision.

7) Why NAVY GMO and not AF or Army? Do those other departments even have GMO's?

I only picked the Navy because I figured most Naval bases are going to be near water, and thus I'd be more likely to live in a more enjoyable location (ie San Diego or Camp Pendleton). The AF is supposedly the cushiest of all, but it seems like most of their bases are in undesirable locations (unless you like Fallon, NV).
 

riversoul

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Thank you very much for that incredibly informative and helpful post, bricktamland! As a result, there is almost no chance that I will pursue HPSP. I do still want to serve my country one day, though, and am now consdiering FAP instead, in which I, not the military, choose the residency that my numbers are competitive enough for, and then serve time in the military AFTER finishing.

Also, based on your experience and assuming a med school acceptance, I'm contemplating taking a year or two off after med school graduation if I haven't really found the specialty i'm most interested in. I'm not sure how common "gap" years are but I'm guessing those year(s) may give me time to pursue more research in a certain field and other things (help out with medical missions abroad, and maybe even get married and such if I unexpectedly meet an SO during med school) before settling into a residency.

Thanks again.
 

BomberDoc

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Count that as a life saved by bricktamland. Strong work. Probably won't make a good OPR bullet, though.
 

bricktamland

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Count that as a life saved by bricktamland. Strong work. Probably won't make a good OPR bullet, though.

Fortunately Riversoul had the foresight to gather enough information to make an informed decision, which is more than I can say for myself after being hoodwinked by that shifty recruiter.
 

bricktamland

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So I've decided to make a major change of plans and apply for Radiology. Anyone here with any personal experience applying to civilian Rads programs after your GMO tour?

I still love FM (but sadly I'm not "in love"). I've been secretly fantasizing about Rads for a year or so now. I never considered it in med school, and never did a rotation. But recently I took a chance and started hanging out with the Radiologists at the hospital. . . . it's awesome! I totally cheated on FM. . . . but Radiology just "feels so right." It's like that cheezy dating show; I've had a "Change of Heart." I don't know if sweet old FM will forgive me.

Rads is sort of a long shot for me though: mediocre board scores, average grades, no med school rotation, and no research. But I've got to give love a chance. . . . hopefully with the GMO background, a good personal statement explaining my tangled love affair, and some good LOR, I might score some interviews.

I plan to apply broadly and see what happens. I'm even going to apply to the. . . . gulp. . . . Navy programs. I know I'm a sellout, but a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do, right? Even in if it means I have to pimp my a$$ out to the Man again (though I still haven't fully recovered from my first deflowering by the Big Green Weenie)

I'm still going to apply to FM, just to keep my options open, and in case I need a backup plan. (FM will be my little b!tch!)

Anyone have any advice?

--Gracias
 

fnr

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So I've decided to make a major change of plans and apply for Radiology. Anyone here with any personal experience applying to civilian Rads programs after your GMO tour?

I still love FM (but sadly I'm not "in love"). I've been secretly fantasizing about Rads for a year or so now. I never considered it in med school, and never did a rotation. But recently I took a chance and started hanging out with the Radiologists at the hospital. . . . it's awesome! I totally cheated on FM. . . . but Radiology just "feels so right." It's like that cheezy dating show; I've had a "Change of Heart." I don't know if sweet old FM will forgive me.

Rads is sort of a long shot for me though: mediocre board scores, average grades, no med school rotation, and no research. But I've got to give love a chance. . . . hopefully with the GMO background, a good personal statement explaining my tangled love affair, and some good LOR, I might score some interviews.

I plan to apply broadly and see what happens. I'm even going to apply to the. . . . gulp. . . . Navy programs. I know I'm a sellout, but a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do, right? Even in if it means I have to pimp my a$$ out to the Man again (though I still haven't fully recovered from my first deflowering by the Big Green Weenie)

I'm still going to apply to FM, just to keep my options open, and in case I need a backup plan. (FM will be my little b!tch!)

Anyone have any advice?

--Gracias


Hey
I did a FM internship and then 4 years navy gmo.....wanted radiology and did it and was the right choice.....now 8 years out of residency......
A program you may look at is VCU in richmond virginia......the radiology department chair a prior AF major......the head of medical student education is a retired Army colonel radiologist......and they have a prior GMO navy in the residency program now.
good luck
 

bricktamland

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fnr,

Thanks for the advice! I read your post 10 minutes ago, and submitted an application to VCU right afterwards. It's kind of a coincidence, but one of my best friends from med school is a gen surg resident there, and I was on the phone with him last night, and he asked if I'd applied to VCU.

It must be a sign!

Thanks again,

Brick
 

fnr

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fnr,

Thanks for the advice! I read your post 10 minutes ago, and submitted an application to VCU right afterwards. It's kind of a coincidence, but one of my best friends from med school is a gen surg resident there, and I was on the phone with him last night, and he asked if I'd applied to VCU.

It must be a sign!

Thanks again,

Brick
hopefully a good sign....i would reccommend calling Ann Fulcher or Jim Messmer......the program has a history of taking the non traditional person....
Look the vcu radiology website of residents and past residents....... the one guy did Nuc medicine there and then radiology. They have a navy GMO and I know a prior FS air force that did his residency there and finished in 2004....

FNR (former navy rad or FU navy radiology)
 

fnr

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hopefully a good sign....i would reccommend calling Ann Fulcher or Jim Messmer......the program has a history of taking the non traditional person....
Look the vcu radiology website of residents and past residents....... the one guy did Nuc medicine there and then radiology. They have a navy GMO and I know a prior FS air force that did his residency there and finished in 2004....

FNR (former navy rad or FU navy radiology)

also look at hershey penn the head of msk is the prior navy residency program director retired capt at bethesda Dr Flemming....... wichita kansas Dr dan davis is the head of residency and prior navy residency director at san diego....
ohio state head of chest is retired colonel and usushs graduate DR Rosoda-Dechristsion (sp)
Vice chaiman in kentucky Dr Jim Buck prior navy rad...
 

bricktamland

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fnr,

It seems many programs abound with former military doctors. Thanks for all these leads, hopefully one of them will work out for me!
 
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