NBME's Standardized Patient Exam

Discussion in 'Medical Students - MD' started by Zubin, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. Zubin

    Zubin Junior Member

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    What do you think about the proposed SPE that may be implemented for the graduating class of 2005? Here's AMSA's description (http://www.amsa.org/meded/nbme_spe.cfm):

    1. The examination will consist of a minimum of 10 scored cases. Each encounter will last ? hour, with the overall duration of the exam being 5 to 6 hours.
    2. The NBME is examining several different delivery models, but the one that will most likely be selected is 5-7 test centers located strategically throughout the country, operating continuously throughout the year. This model is the most effective, reliable, and affordable of the ones NBME has been looking at. The feasibility of supplemental test sites at medical schools is being evaluated, but this is unlikely to occur at first and may add to the overall cost.
    3. The cost of the examination is estimated to be around $975. The major components of the cost are salaries for standardized patients and staff, and the cost of building and operating the electronic infrastructure for test sites.
    4. Field trials will be conducted in 2002 and the NBME is planning to start live testing in the second or third quarter of 2004, with the requirement that the graduating class of 2005 complete the examination as a part of the licensure sequence. The standardized patient exam may become a prerequisite for Step 3.
     
  2. carddr

    carddr Senior Member
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    Sounds just like the Clinical Skills Assesement, CSA, required NOW for all IMGs, only it cost $1200. and is only given in Phila. and has 11 cases and they throw out one for you. So get ready it's coming like a train!!! <img border="0" alt="[Clappy]" title="" src="graemlins/clappy.gif" />
     
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  3. njbmd

    njbmd Guest
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    Hi there,

    I participated in a Clinical Skills Assessment Exam with standardized patients given by my medical school. It was no big deal. If you have been alive during your third year, you should have no problems with this exam. During a clerkship at Mayo in Rochester, MN, I participated in testing the standardized patients for their Clinical Skills Assessment exam to be given to students at the end of their third year. It was a great experience because I got to see the processing behind the way these tests are constructed. Again, if you have been alive during third year, you should have no problem with these tests. :cool:
     
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  4. Hercules

    Hercules Son of Zeus
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    A lot of med schools already do their own clinical skills exams. We have to start taking ours during our first year. The difference between each school doing it and a national "standardized" version is the cost and inconvenience. I'm not really excited about having to pay a grand to travel to another state to take a test that my school already does on its own, but it doesn't look like we're going to get much of a choice. I would however love to see an actual itemized list explaining why the exam will cost each student around a thousand dollars...
     
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