Need a Job

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by Scooby-Doo, Feb 27, 2007.

  1. Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo Guest

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    Hi guys! I need some help. I just graduated from college in December. I had planned to become a CNA but after orientation, I found that it was not for me. Now I am deciding not to work. I plan to volunteer, shadow a DO, and study really hard for the MCAT. Will not working be detrimental to my acceptance to medical school. If it is, what jobs should I look at. So far, I was looking at being a lab assistant, phlebotomist, or a Patient Care Tech (people say it's the same as a CNA). Please help. What should I do?
     
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  3. noshie

    noshie Don't judge!
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    May I ask why CNA was not for you? Was it the money or the work envolved that you did not like? Personally, I think working would be good for anyone. I have worked since I was in high school, not for the money, but for the experience that I have been able to gain. I have always thought that people that dont work until they get their degrees are rather irresponsible and not as able to communicate with others in a professional setting. I am not in any way associated with the ADCOMS, but I have heard that they like to see that you are doing something after you graduate. Volunteering may fill in the void of not doing anything, but you will never get as much exposure to patient care until you are actually working in a clinical setting. Get a Job!
     
  4. Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo Guest

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    I have been working for more than two years (family business). I am not trying to void anything. I really want to do well on my MCAT. I wish I could work more but being the oldest of a big family holds many responsibility when both parents are working over time.
     
  5. iwilldlvr

    iwilldlvr not listening
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    Patient Care Tech is the same as CNA unless you are in the ER. Then you have some really cool stuff. Also, the psych unit is usually different. They are both good for patient contact and not having the "normal" CNA duties that just aren't for everybody (myself included). Sounds like some of the other jobs you are looking at will require more training and schooling. You could always contact the education dept at a local hospital and see what classes they have. That way, you can get trained faster and usually can get a job there once done.

    Don't listen to people that are trying to make you feel bad for making your schooling and med prep come first. Some of those people that work too many hours a week have low gpa's and mcat scores (and no interview invites). So, working your butt off at a job is not always the best thing. Work as much as you need to and still have time for all the med prep. Just try to make it a job that will give you patient interaction so that you don't have to volunteer as much.

    I know many that work a lot during undergrad that are irresponsible. Working while in school does not denote responsibility. Your personality and values make that determination.
     
  6. Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo Guest

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    thank you for your advice.
     
  7. Krisss17

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    While I agree that CNA is not for everyone, that is not the only position that you could try to get in the hospital to have some exposure. Have you ever thought about being a transporter? You'll have patient contact, plus you'll have an opportunity to move all throughout the hospital.

    I work as a health unit coordinator/cardiac monitor tech and I've gotten a pretty good education just working on the floor.

    Volunteering is good, but actually working within the field will give you a little more indepth view. And as you have said, you graduated in December (have you been accepted anywhere yet?), working might not be a bad idea, even ifit is only part-time.
     
  8. noshie

    noshie Don't judge!
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    I was not trying to make him feel bad. I was just stating my opinion. It is true, I have worked alot, and maybe it has taken a toll on my grades, then again who knows maybe it hasnt. My not getting any interviews this year is not something that I am going to be ashamed of, so you can say it as many times as you like and fit it into any conversation you want. I just think if you are not taking classes, it should not be difficult to work in a medical setting and study for the MCAT. You are correct, just working and having multiple responsibilities is not the only thing that makes you responsible. But being in a professional setting, or clinical setting, can really up your communication skills and professionalism, which will help you when you get an interview.
     

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