1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Download free Tapatalk for iPhone or Tapatalk for Android for your phone and follow the SDN forums with push notifications.
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Hey Texans—join us for a DFW meetup! Click here to learn more.
    Dismiss Notice

Need Advice! Please help!

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by UnimaasMED, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. UnimaasMED

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Dental Student
    Hi everybody,

    I obtained a Master’s degree in Neuropsychology from a university in Netherlands. My degree was accredited by World Educational Services and evaluated as equivalent to a Master’s degree in Neuropsychology from an accredited institution in USA. I am a Green card holder and will be immigrating to USA soon. What are my options to continue my path from there? Can I get licensed as a Neuropsychologist? Would it be better to apply for a P.H.D or PsyD program? What are my chances to get in a good program considering that I have a 3.1 GPA in my Bachelor and a 3.7 GPA in my Masters?
    I hope you guys can help me out. Any suggestions are much appreciated.
     
  2. Note: SDN Members do not see this ad.

  3. Jon Snow

    Jon Snow Senior Member
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    3,209
    Likes Received:
    397
    Attend a doctoral program in clinical psychology (PhD or PsyD). Attend a div 40 internship, attend a div 40 postdoc.
    No. There is no neuropsychology license. You'd have to get licensed as a clinical psychologist. In the US, it is a doctoral level field.

    Better to apply to a funded PhD program. Meaning, if you go to a funded program, tuition is free.

    As far as grades, that's not enough information. Have to take the GRE. Your work experience should be an advantage. Plus, the diversity of having an international student.
     
  4. UnimaasMED

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Dental Student
    Thanks for your reply Jon,

    If I got it right in order to practice psychology in US I would have to get into a doctoral program in clinical psychology which would take me 4 to 6 years to finish (despite of having a Master degree) right? Can' I have my Master transfered to a doctoral program and complete the program in 3 years?

    BTW what is a div 40 postdoc program?

    Thanks for your help!
     
  5. switcheroo

    switcheroo Me: 1; Grad school: 0
    2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Medical Student
    The problem with clinical PhDs is that there is a lot of specialized graduate work that you *must* complete for internship/licensure purposes. So, even though you might be able to gain admission in clinical psych as a PhD student (two people admitted my year were admitted directly to the PhD because they had Master's degrees in other areas of psychology), you still have to complete all the coursework/practica required of any student who was admitted out of their Bachelor's. So, it's not quite as simple as being admitted either as a Master's student and finishing in 4-6 years, or as a PhD student and finishing in 3 years.
     
  6. arkatype

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Status:
    Pre-Psychology
    I'd advise you to do a little research, though. Think about what you actually want to do with your degree. If it's important to you to have the title neuropsychologist and a private practice, then you do need to essentially start your graduate training from the ground up, unless you can get a doctoral degree outside the US and get some state licensing board to recognize it. Licensure as a psychologist in the US is a nightmare of conflicting and opaque regulation, different in each of the 50 states.

    However, on a national level, a group of neuropsychologists had a conference in Houston in the late 90's, and they banded together to set standards for neuropsych training. This essentially protects their professional turf and establishes neuropsych as requiring an additional two years of post-doctoral experience beyond the Ph.D.

    If your desire is to be a research neuropsychologist, however, you may be able to get staff positions on major research projects with your current qualifications. You may even, over time, end up making as much money in staff research positions as you are likely to make later with the title neuropsychologist.
     
  7. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    1,630
    uni,

    in the US psychologist and neuropsychologist are both doctoral level positions. you cannot call yourself a psychologist with a doctorate. neuropsychologist in the states designates that you completed an additional 2 yrs after the completion of your doctorate.

    therefore

    you would have to get a doctorate. following your doctorate you would need to complete a formal 2 yr post doc in neuropsychology. you would then need to sit for the boards and complete oral and written examinations. this is a vast over simplification, and there are many many details that you would need to learn about.

    state laws usually restrict masters level people from giving neuropsycholoigcal services.

    division 40 is the neuropsychology subgroup of the American Psychological Association.

    and arkatype is wrong: you will not be called a staff neuropsychologist in a research institution with your current qualifications and you will not make the same amount.
     
  8. UnimaasMED

    5+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    1
    Status:
    Dental Student
    Thanks all for your replies. I know it has been a long time since my last posting but a question just came into my mind.
    If I go back to Europe to earn a PhD in psychology would I then be able to come back for the 2 years post-doc internship here and then become a licenced psychologist?

    I know that the system in Europe is completely different. In Germany for example, to become a clinical psychologist who performs psychotherapy you would have to go through a 3 years clinical internship after you gradute from the psychology school (with a diploma which is equivalent to a Master). But since licenced psychologist is a doctorate level position my guess is that that wouldn't help me much.

    In Germany a Ph.D is more guided towards research then clinical work and psychotherapy.

    Please share your thoughts!
     
  9. PSYDR

    PSYDR Psychologist
    10+ Year Member

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2005
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    1,630
    PM'ed


    but FYI: it is a one year pre doctoral internship and a one year post doctoral year.

    two years formal intership with significant didactics for neuro. plus the passing of a board exam in addition to whatever licensing stuff you have to pass.
     

Share This Page