Kidpolean

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I am a 24 year old African American male that just finished my AAS and all of my nursing prereqs. I let everyone convince me that I wasn't smart enough to become a doctor and that nurses make good enough money without all of the extra years of training. However, now that I have finished my nursing prereqs, I feel that they weren't very challenging at all and that I could definitely take on a greater challenge. I originally wanted to be a doctor but I did 4 years in the army, had a son, and got engaged. My soon to be wife is also pursuing a doctorate degree. Because nursing prereqs are so different from med school prereqs, I might have to do an additional 3-4 years to get my bachelors and be able to enter med school.

As the man of the house I feel that I must provide for my family but going the med school route would make that extremely hard to do. I am set to enter nursing school in June for 18 months to graduate with my BSN.

I would like to know if you guys think that going the med school route would be worth it in the end? Should I follow my dream regardless of everything that I have mentioned? Or at this point would it be best just to get my BSN and accept that I will never be a doctor?

I asked this question on allnurses and most people just told me to become an NP. What do you guys think about this? Do you think that being an NP wouldn't be enough for a person that aspires to be a doctor?
 

blackroses

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No one can tell you what to do. You have to decide what is most important to you. Do your research, learn about a few different options (including NP, PA, MD, etc), learn about the pros and cons of each route, then act based off of that.
 

Kidpolean

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No one can tell you what to do. You have to decide what is most important to you. Do your research, learn about a few different options (including NP, PA, MD, etc), learn about the pros and cons of each route, then act based off of that.
Thank you for the reply...If I may ask, what would you do if you were in my exact situation? I understand that I must make the decision myself but I would like to hear how another person would deal with this situation.
 
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blackroses

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I can't answer that because I personally wouldn't make the choices that would put me in that exact situation to begin with.
 

Theafoni

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Thank you for the reply...If I may ask, what would you do if you were in my exact situation? I understand that I must make the decision myself but I would like to hear how another person would deal with this situation.

What's your GPA looking like?
 

Aerus

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I am a 24 year old African American male that just finished my AAS and all of my nursing prereqs. I let everyone convince me that I wasn't smart enough to become a doctor and that nurses make good enough money without all of the extra years of training. However, now that I have finished my nursing prereqs, I feel that they weren't very challenging at all and that I could definitely take on a greater challenge. I originally wanted to be a doctor but I did 4 years in the army, had a son, and got engaged. My soon to be wife is also pursuing a doctorate degree. Because nursing prereqs are so different from med school prereqs, I might have to do an additional 3-4 years to get my bachelors and be able to enter med school.

As the man of the house I feel that I must provide for my family but going the med school route would make that extremely hard to do. I am set to enter nursing school in June for 18 months to graduate with my BSN.

I would like to know if you guys think that going the med school route would be worth it in the end? Should I follow my dream regardless of everything that I have mentioned? Or at this point would it be best just to get my BSN and accept that I will never be a doctor?

I asked this question on allnurses and most people just told me to become an NP. What do you guys think about this? Do you think that being an NP wouldn't be enough for a person that aspires to be a doctor?

If you have a supportive spouse who has her own income, you can find a way to make it work. The "man must provide for family" attitude is BS.

Of course, if neither of you generate income, then you will have to talk about this with her, since you both have a son to look after.
 
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Kidpolean

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What's your GPA looking like?
3.9, I have A's in every class except Bio 202 where I earned a B. Not trying to make excuses but I got cocky and took on 3 science classes at once which I should have never done. It was a high B though.
 

Kidpolean

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If you have a supportive spouse who has her own income, you can find a way to make it work. The "man must provide for family" attitude is BS.

Of course, if neither of you generate income, then you will have to talk about this with her, since you both have a son to look after.
Thank you for the reply. We both are veterans and receive full GI bill benefits. Both of our undergraduates are completely paid for, we receive monthly living stipends, and work. So money wouldn't be an issue until I can enter med school.

Im a bit old school, so I put pressure on myself to provide for the family. My fiancee doesn't feel that the man has to provide this is just how I was raised.
 

Aerus

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Thank you for the reply. We both are veterans and receive full GI bill benefits. Both of our undergraduates are completely paid for, we receive monthly living stipends, and work. So money wouldn't be an issue until I can enter med school.

Im a bit old school, so I put pressure on myself to provide for the family. My fiancee doesn't feel that the man has to provide this is just how I was raised.

Time to get rid of that old attitude. Not only is it disrespectful to women (including your wife), but it will possibly prevent you from pursuing your dream as a doctor. Talk with your wife about this decision and get her input on this. But also do a little more research to see if this is the path for you.
 
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NYCdude

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^Well that's disrespectful. Some people have different beliefs than you do, Aerus. Deal with it.
 

NYCdude

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If it were me, I would gauge just how badly I wanted to be a doctor and if I was prepared to make the necessary sacrifices required to pursue that dream. If you're wavering on the issue, then it might not be so wise to take the plunge and commit what would amount to 7-8 years of further study. But if you're dead set on it, then go for it. You won't be coming back into this world for a second life.
 
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AmishExpressWay

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OP, do what makes you happy. If you think going into nursing will be a mistake, it most likely will be. Life is short, live it how you want, not how others expect you to live it.

Though I am younger and with far less responsibility, I am going through a process similar to your own, so I think I know how you feel.
 
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Aerus

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^Well that's disrespectful. Some people have different beliefs than you do, Aerus. Deal with it.

Well that's hypocritical of you, calling someone disrespectful for telling someone that it's disrespectful to have a certain belief.

In any case, if he ever wants to be a doctor, he will have to drop that attitude. Working in med school works for some people, but not everyone.
 

NYCdude

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Well that's hypocritical of you, calling someone disrespectful for telling someone that it's disrespectful to have a certain belief.

In any case, if he ever wants to be a doctor, he will have to drop that attitude. Working in med school works for some people, but not everyone.
How is his belief disrespectful? He and his wife are mutually agreed upon that point so it literally hurts nobody. Try not to impose your own beliefs on others.
 

Aerus

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How is his belief disrespectful? He and his wife are mutually agreed upon that point so it literally hurts nobody. Try not to impose your own beliefs on others.

And where did you get the idea that his wife mutally agreed that it's perfectly fine to have a "I'm the man so I should provide for the family" attitude?
 

Kidpolean

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Thanks for all the replies. No need to argue here guys.

I do feel that nursing will be a mistake and that I will probably always want to be more than an rn/np.
 
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Aerus

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Thanks for all the replies. No need to argue here guys.

I do feel that nursing will be a mistake and that I will probably always want to be more than an rn/np.

Best of luck.
 
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Flashfan

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If I was older with a family I might go the NP/CRNA route. It is a long road and the rewards are great, but delayed. Honestly, family means a lot to me, and I wouldn't want to sacrifice raising him. The money can be good for NP, and CRNA would be very rewarding. You could still specialize.
Now the other obstacle is how you would feel at work if you are never the person in charge. That doesn't mean that you won't be a leader, but an attending has additional responsibilities and pressure. If that is for you, then great.
Be aware that the GI Bill has a limit, so you would be going into debt for this dream. I would shadow NPs and Drs. and see if you could be satisfied.
 
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DokterMom

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Thanks for all the replies. No need to argue here guys.
I do feel that nursing will be a mistake and that I will probably always want to be more than an rn/np.

You might want to investigate PA programs also -- Could be a really good middle ground that allows you to earn good money more quickly, then eventually go to medical school after your wife finishes her doctorate and your family can more easily afford it.

While I understand and respect your desire to provide financially for your family, don't be short-sighted about it. You could make more money now if you dropped out of college and became a barista. You could make a little more later if your get a BSN. You could make a little more that that a little later if you go PA. Or you could rake in the big bucks a few more years later if you become a physician. Either way, it's providing financially for your family. It's just the amount and timing that differ.

Time to get rid of that old attitude. Not only is it disrespectful to women (including your wife), but it will possibly prevent you from pursuing your dream as a doctor. Talk with your wife about this decision and get her input on this. But also do a little more research to see if this is the path for you.

Please also pay attention to the point @Aerus makes. If your fiancee is an equal team member and partner, mentally 'discounting' her income as part of the family (all of you) total, actually is disrespectful. It's devaluing her contributions. And while it's certainly reasonable for a woman to expect her husband to contribute financially to the best of his abilities, expecting him to do all the financial heavy lifting is neither fair nor reasonable. If she's worth marrying, her opinions are worth considering.
 
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kthxbai

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^Well that's disrespectful. Some people have different beliefs than you do, Aerus. Deal with it.

I'm going to butt in and say that beliefs shouldn't stand in the way of practicality.

What's more important, OP's view on the (getting more antiquated by the minute) traditional man-woman relationship or survival through the next 4 years (not counting residency)?

Get real. Blind idealism is so college.
 
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kraskadva

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I am a 24 year old African American male that just finished my AAS and all of my nursing prereqs. I let everyone convince me that I wasn't smart enough to become a doctor and that nurses make good enough money without all of the extra years of training. However, now that I have finished my nursing prereqs, I feel that they weren't very challenging at all and that I could definitely take on a greater challenge. I originally wanted to be a doctor but I did 4 years in the army, had a son, and got engaged. My soon to be wife is also pursuing a doctorate degree. Because nursing prereqs are so different from med school prereqs, I might have to do an additional 3-4 years to get my bachelors and be able to enter med school.

As the man of the house I feel that I must provide for my family but going the med school route would make that extremely hard to do. I am set to enter nursing school in June for 18 months to graduate with my BSN.

I would like to know if you guys think that going the med school route would be worth it in the end? Should I follow my dream regardless of everything that I have mentioned? Or at this point would it be best just to get my BSN and accept that I will never be a doctor?

I asked this question on allnurses and most people just told me to become an NP. What do you guys think about this? Do you think that being an NP wouldn't be enough for a person that aspires to be a doctor?
Hi OP :)
Why don't you take a stroll on over to the nontrad board. You'll find more people there who have been/ are in the same situation (veterans, parents, spouses, etc.) and can give you more practical advice than the mostly 18-21, sans responsibilities, crowd here. Maybe start by reading the success stories threadhttp://forums.studentdoctor.net/ind...trads Already Accepted to Med School).675835/ to get some idea of who is/has been over there and what they've done.
And Best of luck, whichever route you decide on.
 
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