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Neuropsychology Internship Application CV Question

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by wv7887, Sep 8, 2017.

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  1. wv7887

    wv7887

    8
    0
    Jan 9, 2017
    Hi,

    I am in the process of organizing my CV and was wondering how specific to be when describing my neuropsych training experiences. For example, I have " outpatient neuropsychological assessment of adult and geriatric clients with medical and neurological difficulties." Should I be more specific and list the types of conditions that I primarily see in parentheses (i.e., dementia, traumatic brain injury, stroke) ? Or should I mention these conditions in the cover letter? I want to ensure that the readers are aware of the types of conditions that I have worked with to highlight the fit between my experiences and the training offered. Thanks!
     
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  3. Kadhir

    Kadhir

    106
    59
    Nov 13, 2015
    I recommend putting sample referral questions in parens- this doesn't take up too much space. You should definitely describe in more detail in the cover letter the skills you acquired from seeing these patients, particularly if they are germane to the site's training experiences. But for internship at least, I do think it's good to go into a bit more detail in the clinical section of your CV.
     
    LETSGONYR and Therapist4Chnge like this.
  4. Justanothergrad

    Justanothergrad Counseling Psychologist 2+ Year Member

    802
    438
    Mar 2, 2013
    Psychologist
    Faculty
    Disclaimer: I'm not a neuropsychologist

    But yes, be more specific. The people reading your CV want to know the details because it is directly relevant to what you are telling them you can do and want to do. What types of issues do you have experience with (mTBI vs. tumor vs. Parkinson's vs. Stroke vs. epilepsy etc.)? What instruments do you know? Did you have exposure to looking at fMRI/CT/Etc.? What role did you play (trained monkey giving the WAIS vs. report writing and case formulation).
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2017
    LETSGONYR and Therapist4Chnge like this.
  5. LETSGONYR

    LETSGONYR 5+ Year Member

    351
    85
    Jul 7, 2012
    Washington, DC
    Agreed with the others... I'd be specific and list some populations with which you have worked. That said, I would limit it to the main populations with whom you feel most comfortable or have the most experience (this can be tailored to different sites).

    Two reasons for this... first, you don't want the section to be too long. Second, you don't want to appear to be padding your CV. If you have seen one patient with a certain disorder, I probably wouldn't include it (unless there's a special reason... related to a clinic at the internship site, one of your report samples, etc.). You don't want to include a super rare disorder on your CV unless you are prepared to talk about it with some degree of expertise.

    There's always wiggle room, though, depending on your particular situation... for example, if you worked on a hem/onc unit, mentioning rare cancers would be appropriate. Also, you can (and should) talk about unique cases in your cover letter or an interview. But don't just "disorder drop," talk about how it contributed to your growth as a clinician.
     
  6. wv7887

    wv7887

    8
    0
    Jan 9, 2017
    Thank you all for the input, I will definitely be adding the populations I most often work with.
     

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