Bonobo

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I have often wondered about the differences between neurosurgery and interventional cardiology in terms of job satisfaction, job market, and lifestyle. Both fields require emergency call and signficant hours in patient care. It appears that the work week is more unpredictable in neurosurgery than in interventional cardiology. Do neurosurgeons work more hours as well? Also, cardiology appears to allow more flexibility in job opportunities and styles, but neurosurgeons may have an easier time finding a job in the first place.

What do you all think about these two fields and their differences?
 

mpp

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Interventional cardiology is lacking in both the variety of procedures and in the variety of conditions treated. I think it would be too tedious for me, but the demand will always be greater. Until every hospital in the country has a staffed cath lab you'll be able to find a job out there as an internventional cardiologist; what they do is now the standard of care for one of the most (if not THE most) common hospital admission. They'll be new stuff in the future for sure (intravascualr valve repair) but it just doesn't seem as interesting as the nervous system no matter how you slice it. If I definitely wanted good hours and high job opportunities I would do niether of these specialties.
 
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In terms of competitiveness, what are the chances of getting a cards fellowship as opposed to a neurosurg residency? Does anyone know what the average work hours for each?
 

DoctwoB

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In terms of competitiveness, what are the chances of getting a cards fellowship as opposed to a neurosurg residency? Does anyone know what the average work hours for each?
Cards is one of, if not the most competitive IM fellowships. However, most people who match into neurosurgery would have matched into a top IM program, where the graduates seem to have little trouble getting a cards fellowship. Obviously it is different in that matching into neuro is based on med school performance while matching into cards is largely based on residency performance.