Feb 7, 2010
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My husband is interested in obtaining a non-clinical Psy.D. to teach. He is interested in teaching criminal justice and psychology classes at community colleges, online, and at some of the smaller public 4 yr Universities. He is not interested in the Ph.D. program for whatever reason. How realistically can he expect to accomplish this with a non-clinical Psy.D.?
 

Therapist4Chnge

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A non-clinical Psy.D. is somewhat of an oxymoron, since the original purpose of the Psy.D. was clinical practice. I'm not sure if I've heard of a legitimate program offering this type of Psy.D. He should reconsider his degree choice and path.
 

KillerDiller

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Yeah, I'm not sure what a non-clinical Psy.D would look like. So, students wouldn't do research or clinical work? What would they be doing for 5 years? Your husband could probably pursue those types of jobs with simply a masters degree in general psych as long as he doesn't want a tenure track position. If he does want a tenure-track position, a Ph.D would put him in the best position.

As a caveat, psychology, like the other "ologies" is a research driven field. Consequently, even a general psych degree should require some experience and familiarity with research.
 

Therapist4Chnge

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Research is becoming more and more important, particularly with the focus on emperically based treatments. Community college and undergraduate classes may not be as effected by this shift, but it is still very important to have a firm grasp on research and statistics. It is possible for him to teach with a MA/MS, but there will be little room for advancement. The competition for full-time teaching positions is quite steep, so anything less than what I wrote above will put him at a severe disadvantage. Teaching a class or two a semester will not provide a livable income. If he chooses to go for a doctorate, a residentially-based doctorate from an APA-acred. doctoral program is the best way to go. Doctoral training at a traditional program will also provide him with more opportunity to teach while he is in training.
 

erg923

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If teaching is his only goal, one can do that with a masters at CCs and some very small colleges. He would likely be hired as an adjunct lecturer (ie., not faculty). As others have said, there is no such thing as a non-clinical psy.d. The vale conference/training model was developed specifically for clinical training purposes. The suffix "ology" means "the study of." If your not practicing it (ie., non-clinical), you're studying it, which of course=research. Also, although it hasnt been stated, I think its obvious that he would need some kind of formal education and training in criminal justice in order to teach that too.
 
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Feb 7, 2010
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Thanks for your replies. He has a BA and MS in Criminal Justice/Criminology. He has also been a police officer for the past ten years and wants to start teaching criminal justice classes and psych classes on the side. Adjunct teaching jobs out here are pretty competitive.

The program out here has non-clinical and clinical Psy.D. programs. Obviously, the clinical program is much longer and a reason he wants to go after the non-clinical program. He has no interest in obtaining his license and practice. It's a R.A. program and has a good reputation in the state.

The non-clinical Psy.D., has a specialization in Criminal Justice and Criminology. The Criminal Justice Ph.D. programs out here are a little too expensive and time consuming.

Thanks again!
 

erg923

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Could you please explain what this "non-clinical psy.d" training model/philosophy is, and what the goal/point of this degree is? There is no research componet, no dissertation, no practica, and no clinical training? What is it that student actually does to be awarded a doctorate then? Im sorry, this just makes no sense.....
 
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Feb 7, 2010
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Could you please explain what this "non-clinical psy.d" training model/philosophy is, and what the goal/point of this degree is? There is no research componet, no dissertation, no practica, and no clinical training? What is it that student actually does to be awarded a doctorate then? Im sorry, this just makes no sense.....

Thanks again. Here is the link to the school and program: http://rockies.edu/campus/psydcriminologyandjustice.php

It's not a mill and its pretty well known in the Colorado Springs area. I guess you have to complete a few residencies and a dissertation to graduate.

I was a little weary of the degree at first but looked into it a little. He's pretty hell bent on attending the school and receiving that degree, even against my advice. I thought he should go after a PhD in Criminal Justice from a well known BM school, but I guess not.
 

erg923

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I see. I still cant really tell what this is, but this is NOT a Psy.D as is typically thought of, neither in its focus nor in its training model/philosophy.

Frankly, this looks like a degree in criminology with some psychopathology sprinkled on top for decoration and one practicum requirement that look like I/O psych (ie., "students obtain direct organizational experience during one or more organizational consulting opportunities"). If all your husband wants to do is teach and has little interest in research, I dont undertsand why he would put himself through this hodge-podged cross between criminology, I/O psych, and clinical psych that requires an emiprical dissertation. Seems like overkill to me is all.

Have you asked him where people with this degree typically work, other than teaching? Who exactly hires people with this degree? How marketable is it? I would probably argue that the diverse training in that curriculum is more of draw-back than an asset. I think most companies would rather have someone who was really good at one thing (forensic psychologist or a ph.d criminologist), rather than someone who is somewhat trained in 3 or 4 different diciplines.
 
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