pyropig

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Just curious, as long as all the prerequisite coursework is completed with good grades, do you think being a non-science major will actually be a advantage? Maybe the school will see it as adding a little diversity to its class? I'm getting my bachelors of science in Economics next semester and than returning to retake (and take some more) science classes, possibly getting a second bachelors (in biology) while Im at it.
 

FrkyBgStok

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i wouldn't argue that it is an advantage by any means, but with the right classes it definitely isn't a disadvantage. maybe something extra to talk about.
 
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298116

While it may not be an advantage, I think getting stellar grades in your science coursework AND "non-science major" coursework can mean that you're a well-rounded individual with many interests.

At least I hope so.... I have a degree in Radio-Television-Film. :D
 

da Vincis World

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My undergrad was computer science. I know it helped me as it was mentioned at every interview. I agree that you need good/great grades no matter what your major is.
 

dapdrow

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It would have been an advantage for me because if I majored in something other than science my GPA would've been higher. Science was the only thing I had to make an effort in order to do well. But an advantage overall? Meh, not really.
 

JaggerPlate

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No, it's not an advantage. Schools want you to do well in pre-med course work, and major in something you enjoy. It may bring up some interested questions during the interview, etc, but no advantage in reality.
 

pyropig

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No, it's not an advantage. Schools want you to do well in pre-med course work, and major in something you enjoy. It may bring up some interested questions during the interview, etc, but no advantage in reality.
Oh I'm not at all saying it's any kind of replacement for excellent grades in the sciences. I'm just saying it provides a certain......uniqueness to the dime a dozen bio majors. A talking point that makes you a memorable candidate. A more well rounded student with a worldly perspective not molded solely by the influences of the hard sciences.
 

JaggerPlate

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Oh I'm not at all saying it's any kind of replacement for excellent grades in the sciences. I'm just saying it provides a certain......uniqueness to the dime a dozen bio majors. A talking point that makes you a memorable candidate. A more well rounded student with a worldly perspective not molded solely by the influences of the hard sciences.
I get your theory ... but I just really don't agree. Honestly, the best thing you can do is major in what you enjoy and what you're interested in. You'll do well in the classes, and when asked, this will shine through. I wouldn't do it though because you think it will make you stand out ... I'd do it because it's what you wanted to study.
 

pyropig

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I get your theory ... but I just really don't agree. Honestly, the best thing you can do is major in what you enjoy and what you're interested in. You'll do well in the classes, and when asked, this will shine through. I wouldn't do it though because you think it will make you stand out ... I'd do it because it's what you wanted to study.
That's exactly what I did. I kick some serious arse at economics. Actually got offered a letter of rec. for a PhD program in it (the math though *shudder*). My love of economics and long-time passion for medicine are not exactly......in line. I've just put a medical focus on my economics studies, that tied with strong grades in the sciences. I can only hope that's the "well-rounded" individual the schools speak of on their websites.
 

JustAGuy

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If you do well in your science prereqs, it's probably advantageous, at least at some schools, to be a non-science major because you're adding to the school's diversity. It definitely doesn't hurt your chances.
 

JaggerPlate

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That's exactly what I did. I kick some serious arse at economics. Actually got offered a letter of rec. for a PhD program in it (the math though *shudder*). My love of economics and long-time passion for medicine are not exactly......in line. I've just put a medical focus on my economics studies, that tied with strong grades in the sciences. I can only hope that's the "well-rounded" individual the schools speak of on their websites.
I beg to differ.
 

KG216

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An attending that I spent a lot of time observing with actually brought that point up. He was an english lit major as an undergrad, and he is very involved with my local state medical school...he told me that that specific school likes people with outside majors, because like you said, it demonstrates diversity and also mastery of different disciplines. They don't accept or favor the outside majors any more than those who are bio/pre-med, but he said they find the interviews/students are a slight deviation from the norm.

Obviously, regardless of the major, you have to have the grades/MCAT scores/EC's (etc) and also a good interview to get the acceptance. I agree with most that it is not really an advantage (or a disadvantage) to your application, but it is something that most likely will come up in interviews. I have heard a lot of people say that they were asked something like "How will your studies in X translate into studying and practicing medicine..." or something along those lines.

Good luck!:luck:
 
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298116

That's exactly what I did. I kick some serious arse at economics. Actually got offered a letter of rec. for a PhD program in it (the math though *shudder*). My love of economics and long-time passion for medicine are not exactly......in line. I've just put a medical focus on my economics studies, that tied with strong grades in the sciences. I can only hope that's the "well-rounded" individual the schools speak of on their websites.

I think your knowledge of economics may help if you plan on opening your own practice. But I guess that also depends if you are majoring in Economics in the colllege of Liberal Arts or Business. My university had both, and the programs are very different. Med school doesn't prepare students for the business side of medicine, which is equally important.

I know the Dr. I work for had a rough few years after she opened her private practice, not even making $36,000 her first year! And she has also told me how the hospitals compete with her and purposely do not refer patients to her because she is not a member. (I forgot what it's called but physicians have to become members of different hospitals to be In Network for insurance... something like that.) So, as she put it, they are "actively trying" to put her out of business. But that is her opinion. I haven't worked there long enough to know if that is exactly true. Anyway, even if it doesn't directly help you get into medical school, any additional skills that you learn outside of medicine, such as business skills, will help you in the long run.

And I will also admit that I don't know enough about majoring in Economics to know if you actually learn about these things, but I thought I might as well just mention this.
 
Aug 20, 2009
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While it *might* help you get into medical school, it definitely won't help you get through medical school.