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OTD vS PhD

Discussion in 'Occupational Therapy [ O.T.D ]' started by freds3ws, Nov 30, 2007.

  1. freds3ws

    freds3ws

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    Nov 30, 2007
    Hi all. I have been thinking about going back for a doctorate with the ultimate goal of doing research and/or teaching. In most fields, PhD is the gold standard so I am wondering about the OTD. Is this a good degree? Does is have the same respect as a PhD?
    Thanks for any input!

    ALison
     
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  3. caduceus27

    caduceus27 Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    113
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    Apr 7, 2006
    Ny,Ny
    Hi
    I dont know if this helps Im just a OT student,but I can say that from my readings and the way the field is heading towards, it seems that OTD will be minimum requirement to practice as an Occupational Therapist. That being said getting a OTD nowadays will have its benefits, but over the long run it will not be as competitive. In addition, you are probably familiar with this but OTD is clinical it focuses on OT practice gearing students towards the practice of OT. PHD is research and theory oriented students are trained to do research and teach at university and requires more time. In terms of respect having an OTD vs. PhD about the same. So I think it depends on your preference, you mentioned your goal is to do research and teach so that would be more PHD. My personal opinion having a PHD out weighs the benefits of an OTD. I hope my humble feedback helps.

    Khalid
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2009
  4. superCOTA

    superCOTA MS, OT by 2011 !!! 2+ Year Member

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    Jun 18, 2008
    I'd agree.. youre going to have more atonomy going psych, while making more bucks. The jobs you get as a PhD will be easier every day, with a higher salary, in a college where i have noticed health benefits for a family are hundreds less a month, your daily schedule is much more flexible when your kid gets sick, you can change your hours and probably wouldnt have to even anyone as long as it was met by the end of the week.


    The OTD is something to keep up w/ the "other profession" But like them, there are many BA's BS's MA's and MS's that have a license and there is much talk that their 10 years of experience trumps the doctorate in either field.

    The OTD probably wouln't be taken by someone who wasn't an OT with considerable experience. You would want to focus on a particular area, and unless you were sooo sure about why you wanted to The PT's are doing it b/c they are a 'dedicated service' and will ultimately be able to write their own RX. So this has serious rembuirsement advantages over a MA.
     
  5. chipmunk222

    chipmunk222 2+ Year Member

    51
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    Dec 11, 2008
    I'm not sure if a PhD in OT is an exception to this, but life in academia is not a stroll in the park, as SuperCOTA seems to imply.
    I have spent enough time working in research universities to learn that getting an academic position is extremely competitive and difficult (many more applicants than positions available...unless OT is an exception?), and once you get an academic position, it's not secure unless you have tenure. You cannot get tenure until you have published in good journals, which is not an easy feat to accomplish as competition is fierce. You will need to secure funding, so you will spend most of your time writing grants. An average professor at UCSF where I worked will work 80-100 hrs a week and is under constant stress until he or she gets tenure. Of course, this is a top-notch research university, so they may be working longer hours. I have learned that a clinical degree provides something to fall back on if you cannot find an academic position, and there is nothing holding someone with a clinical degree back from pursuing research and academia, whereas a PhD will make it difficult for you to practice. Do not be fooled by your profs in classes that academia in general is laidback. Sure, your schedule is flexible, but the total hours you will work in way more. I've learned that a clinical degree has way more rewards than a purely research degree. Plus, with a clinical degree you can do a research post-doc, which will give you the same skills as a research degree.

    I'm just talking about academia in general. A PhD in OT may be different...but I doubt it.
     
  6. caduceus27

    caduceus27 Junior Member 7+ Year Member

    113
    1
    Apr 7, 2006
    Ny,Ny
    good advice and perspective, I think I will look into the research post-doc option.
     
  7. superCOTA

    superCOTA MS, OT by 2011 !!! 2+ Year Member

    171
    2
    Jun 18, 2008
    To answer allison's question...
    looking at creighton's cirriculm for their entry level OTD, they dont begin to have the research training (STATISTICS) that a PhD would have. Just looking at it seems tailored to mimic the entry level DPT programs. They focus a lot on management instead.

    wether academia is a stroll in the park or not, as if it's as easier than actually getting your hands dirty... doesn't matter. but it is. :smuggrin:

    This echoes what I really think

    National status of the entry-level doctorate in occupational therapy (OTD).

    Griffiths Y, Padilla R.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, Creighton University Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68178, USA. [email protected]
    A multifaceted survey was conducted to identify the factors that academic occupational therapy (OT) programs were considering in making decisions as to whether the entry-level clinical doctorate (OTD) is a viable alternative for their institutions. The survey was sent in the summer of 2004 to program directors of all (150) occupational therapy programs in the United States. Responses were received from 111 programs (response rate of 74%). Quantitative (demographic) and qualitative (factor identification) data were compiled and analyzed.

    Supporting factors for the development of entry-level OTD programs included
    (a) coexistence of physical therapy doctorate program,
    (b) enhanced preparation of graduates, and
    (c) improved student recruitment.

    Impeding factors included
    (a) limited resources,
    (b) philosophical objections, and
    (c) lack of demand.

    In addition, results suggested that overall there is greater support for the OTD as a postprofessional degree. The study provided a historical record of current decision making in occupational therapy academic programs. In addition, the results of the study suggest a need for the development of national consensus regarding the place of the OTD in occupational therapy education.
    --AJOT 2006 Sep-Oct;60(5):540-50

    I think the philosophical objections include..why do it just to keep up w/ the Joneses?
    But to answer the question ...
    the PhD is a more rigorious program and if alison wants the gold standard as he put it ... the OTD is for OT's who want to hone thier considerable experience and skills to advance the profession.
     
  8. chipmunk222

    chipmunk222 2+ Year Member

    51
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    Dec 11, 2008
    Getting a PhD definitely has its rewards and many people are content with their academic position. I had just wanted to point out that the road to professorship is not easy, not is it guaranteed. You can definitely get a PhD from a top research university and not find employment. Of course, every career has its advantages and disadvantages and it's different for everyone, but its wise to look at all the pros and cons when trying to make a decision.

    Anyway, I'm glad this forum is getting some activity lately! :)
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2009

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