phillips101

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If E ~ 1/n^2, then the "higher" energy levels have LOWER energy.

Why must chemists confuse students so?! :confused:
 

G1SG2

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If E ~ 1/n^2, then the "higher" energy levels have LOWER energy.

Why must chemists confuse students so?! :confused:
E=13.6/n^2. It's actually E=-13.6/n^2, so the larger the n, the smaller the energy BUT because of the negative value, the energy is actually getting larger. For example, for n=1 it's -13.6 eV but for n=2 it's -3.40 eV (-13.6/2^2, which is -13.6/4). Which is higher? -3.40 eV.
 

capn jazz

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In all likelihood, no one studying for the MCAT is going to discover an actual error in a chemical or physical theory. :p
 
OP
P

phillips101

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Jun 11, 2008
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Haha I'm trying to somehow get through the second chapter of TBR's atomic theory. THE most boring stuff I've ever read, gotta find SOME form of entertainment :)