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PDs criteria- How do they see publications on resume??

Discussion in 'General Residency Issues' started by Faizankhan, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. Faizankhan

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    I was just curious to know that american graduates when apply for residency, do not usaully have publications on their resume, they do have research experience but rarely get their names in publication.

    How do the resiency PDs see those FMGs who have publications at undergraduate level? Because they dont expect students to get publications? especially if it gets published in an american journal. I have got a research article published an american journal but the project was carried out in my home country. How much impact it can have especially when applying for university based residency programs?

    Also what kind of research do they prefer from student? Clinical or basic science research? which one has more weightage?

    Thanks and would appreciate your comments!
     
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  3. Faebinder

    Faebinder Slow Wave Smurf
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    Check nrmp statistics and other threads on the subject to get a feeling how much they matter.
     
  4. Actually, for the more competitive fields, US medical students often have publications on their CV.
     
  5. Pinkertinkle

    Pinkertinkle 2003 Member
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    The NRMP data kinda sucks. It doesn't define what a "research experience" is so anything from a 10th author podunk conference abstract to a 1st author Nature paper is lumped into the same group.
     
  6. secretwave101

    secretwave101 Senior Member
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    Your med school experience - including research - is more impressive. Given the ease of getting your name on research papers, it doesn't carry much weight on the CV. It can help you more in the interview when you are able to describe what you actually did on the project (assuming you actually did more than collate stool samples or whatever).
     
  7. Faizankhan

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    So it means publications do make a difference. In my country, the problem is that there is hardly any lab research going on here, we only get the chance to do clinical research. What kind of research experiences are PDs looking for? Do they look for students who are skillfull enough to write research papers or are they looking for someone who can work his ass off and contribute to the research projects while doing the residency?
     
  8. Pinkertinkle

    Pinkertinkle 2003 Member
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    I wouldn't call first or second author papers easy to get. Middle authorships are another story.
     
  9. Which country is that?

    Honestly, if you're an IMG, the most important factors in matching are your USMLE scores and US letters of recommendation.

    Everything else is nice, and can supplement an already-strong application, but won't make up for subpar scores/letters.
     
  10. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    It doesn't really matter if your research is bench or clinically oriented.

    As noted above, research in a peer reviewed journal as first or last author is much more meaningful than being lost somewhere in a no-name journal as 5th author.

    For foreign trained physicians, research authorship comes way down the line in terms of important factors in assessing your application for residency. In addition, it is probably only somewhat important at academic, research heavy programs. FWIW, some community programs may shy away from people with a strong research background assuming that they cannot offer you what you want/need.
     
  11. Faizankhan

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    I agree with blade and winged scapula that USMLE scores and US clinical experience hold the key to success, I have got one month clinical experience at UTSW in internal medicine as permitted at that time by my school, but the letter I got from the attending is good but not very strong, does it make any difference, or just the experience counts? Do PDs read LORs from the US physicians?? I don't think they would have time to read letters!!

    I got my research published in CHEST which is a peer reviewed journal but I think that now I should concentrate more on getting high USMLE scores, and in the mean time do some observerships/(or externship if I am lucky enough to find one) when I go for the CS.

    But still I think every PD has his own way of thinking, some would like students with research experience and some would want students to be clinically sound. Better to get them both!!
     
  12. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Of course they do. Letters are important, they are analyzed for content and by whom the writer is. Since everyone gets "good" letters, its a bit worrisome that you think yours is not very strong - depending on why this is, it may not bode well for your application.

    Chest is a well regarded journal but you are right - your USMLE scores must be high for your application to be even looked at. Programs often filter programs by a certain cut off score; if you aren't above that arbitrary number, your publication will never be seen as the rest of your application will not be downloaded.

    Observerships, IMHO, are worthless.

    Of course. But without a good USMLE Step 1 score, the above will be moot.
     
  13. Agree with the above. Letters of recommendation for IMGs are extremely important - for example, it's critical for these to be from US attendings. Yes, all program directors read all letters.

    As Winged Scapula said, you absolutely have to have at least decent USMLE scores for the rest of your app to be looked at. Published articles in peer-reviewed journals is always a plus - but it won't make up for substandard USMLE scores.
     

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