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I have been browsing residencies and fellowships for pediatrics.

Does anyone know of any DO pediatricians who went to pediatric fellowships such as pediatric cardiology, pediatric gastroenterology, pediatric neurology, or pediatric allergy/immuno?

How competitive are the pediatric fellowships?

Can you do pediatric fellowships after completing the LECOM Primary Care Scholars program in 3 years following a 3 year peds residency?

For LECOM Primary care scholars program, what is considered primary care? is ob/gyn or psychiatry included in this pathway?
 

Daedra22

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This guy serves on the Texas medical board...

" Patrick J. Crocker, D.O.
Dr. Crocker, of Austin, is chief of emergency medicine for emergency service partners in the Emergency Department of Dell Children's Hospital, and an assistant clinical professor of emergency medicine for the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is a member of the Seton Board of Trustees and Take Heart Austin Steering Committee, and is a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is also a member of the Travis County Medical Society and Texas Medical Association, and chair of the Austin/Travis County EMS Quality Assurance Board. Dr. Crocker served in the U.S. Army, and received a bachelor's degree and master's degree in nutrition from the University of California at Berkeley, and a doctorate of osteopathy from the University of Iowa Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery."

http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/boards/mbbios.php

These doctors are peds cardiologists...

http://www.choa.org/default.aspx?id=1244

http://www.choa.org/default.aspx?id=2951

Pediatrics is very popular for DO's, so I assume there are plenty of others who go for fellowships. I am personally somewhat interested in peds/genetics, and I'm confident I'll be able to do that if I still want to at the end of med school. I don't know about LECOM, though, sorry. :)
 

bleeker10

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I have been browsing residencies and fellowships for pediatrics.

Does anyone know of any DO pediatricians who went to pediatric fellowships such as pediatric cardiology, pediatric gastroenterology, pediatric neurology, or pediatric allergy/immuno?

How competitive are the pediatric fellowships?

Can you do pediatric fellowships after completing the LECOM Primary Care Scholars program in 3 years following a 3 year peds residency?

For LECOM Primary care scholars program, what is considered primary care? is ob/gyn or psychiatry included in this pathway?
No you cannot go into a pediatric or IM fellowship if you are PCSP. The only fellowships you can do are geriatrics or OMM. PCSP is for FP, general peds or general IM. No ob/gyn or psych.

This article explains more

http://www.physiciansnews.com/2009/11/05/lecom-develops-a-3-year-medical-school-curriculum-to-encourage-primary-care-careers/
 
Feb 12, 2010
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This guy serves on the Texas medical board...

" Patrick J. Crocker, D.O.
Dr. Crocker, of Austin, is chief of emergency medicine for emergency service partners in the Emergency Department of Dell Children’s Hospital, and an assistant clinical professor of emergency medicine for the University of Texas Medical Branch. He is a member of the Seton Board of Trustees and Take Heart Austin Steering Committee, and is a fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians. He is also a member of the Travis County Medical Society and Texas Medical Association, and chair of the Austin/Travis County EMS Quality Assurance Board. Dr. Crocker served in the U.S. Army, and received a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree in nutrition from the University of California at Berkeley, and a doctorate of osteopathy from the University of Iowa Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery."

http://www.tmb.state.tx.us/boards/mbbios.php

These doctors are peds cardiologists...

http://www.choa.org/default.aspx?id=1244

http://www.choa.org/default.aspx?id=2951

Pediatrics is very popular for DO's, so I assume there are plenty of others who go for fellowships. I am personally somewhat interested in peds/genetics, and I'm confident I'll be able to do that if I still want to at the end of med school. I don't know about LECOM, though, sorry. :)

how competitive are pediatric fellowships?

do you have to do a MD peds residency or can you do a DO peds residency to be eligible for pediatric fellowships?

how many unfilled ped fellowships were there after the match process?
 

J-Rad

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how competitive are pediatric fellowships?

In general, not really. Cardiology, Neonatology, and Emergency are really the only competitive fellowships and are attainable by any reasonable candidate, MD or DO. Peds is truly one of the most DO-friendly fields outside of FM and PM&R. Bside those three (I am excluding Allergy/Immunology as, while attainable from peds or IM, it is not technically a sub-specialty of peds. A&I would, however, be considered reasonably competitive, yet, attainable). Aside from the above three, all sub-specialties are decidedly non-competitive.

do you have to do a MD peds residency or can you do a DO peds residency to be eligible for pediatric fellowships?

Probably can do a AOA (only) approved residency and get most fellowships. But, of all AOA approved residencies, only two don't have ACGME accreditation as well. Further making this somewhat of a non-issue is that to have any degree or geographic flexibility, most people apply to ACGME programs due to a dearth of AOA peds programs.

how many unfilled ped fellowships were there after the match process?
Dunno, but probably a reasonable number in the non-competetive fellowships. These have problems filling because it takes three more years of getting paid like a glorified resident to become specialized and many of these specialties pay the same or even less than a gen peds gig does
.
 

WestcoastMedicine

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I am a peds intern at an ACGME academic program, and a DO. These are some of my thoughts

how competitive are pediatric fellowships?

Pediatric Fellowships can be competitive depending on what you want to go into and where you want to do it. Keep in mind peds subspecialties are a small field. There are entire states that don't have pediatric subspecialists in certain areas. As a result of there not being a ton of fellowships, it can be relatively competitive. In 2010 there were only 18 Pediatric Rheumatology applicants, but there are only 24 spots available IN THE ENTIRE COUNTRY, so some did not match based on geography limitations I would imagine. For most of them, there are more positions than applicants, peds has a huge shortage of specialists. One of the many resons is financial. People complain about medicare reimbursement, for peds most of your patients are medicaid which pays even less. Also, because it is such a small field if you do a fellowship(with the exception of neonatology) you are limiting yourself to almost exclusive academic careers as your not going to open a peds nephro practice on your own...the patients just aren't there. If your in medicine for the money, why do peds cardio and make 160,000 when you can do adult and make double that(I am not in it for the money, just explaining some of the thinking people have)


http://www.nrmp.org/data/resultsanddatasms2010.pdf

These are the 2010 results. Some of the subspecialties are not listed because they do not participate in a match.


Do you have to do a MD peds residency or can you do a DO peds residency to be eligible for pediatric fellowships?

You can do an AOA (only) residency, but it would may make it a little bit harder for you to match into since there are only a dozen AOA programs in the country. There used to be some AOA fellowships, I am not sure if they exist anymore. Since some of the peds fellowships have difficulty getting enough applicants, depending on where you apply I am sure an AOA residency would not hinder you in any way.

how many unfilled ped fellowships were there after the match process?

Look at the link I put above.

This one gives details over the past several years:
http://www.nrmp.org/data/programresultssms2005-2009.pdf
 

Bacchus

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If one's considering A/I... is the pay discrepancy the same as in Peds/Adult cardio? I'm assuming A/Is treat both populations since the fellowship is the same from IM or Peds.
 

WestcoastMedicine

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If one's considering A/I... is the pay discrepancy the same as in Peds/Adult cardio? I'm assuming A/Is treat both populations since the fellowship is the same from IM or Peds.
I don't know the answer to that. Anyone else know?
 
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i am a peds intern at an acgme academic program, and a do. These are some of my thoughts

how competitive are pediatric fellowships?

pediatric fellowships can be competitive depending on what you want to go into and where you want to do it. Keep in mind peds subspecialties are a small field. There are entire states that don't have pediatric subspecialists in certain areas. As a result of there not being a ton of fellowships, it can be relatively competitive. In 2010 there were only 18 pediatric rheumatology applicants, but there are only 24 spots available in the entire country, so some did not match based on geography limitations i would imagine. For most of them, there are more positions than applicants, peds has a huge shortage of specialists. One of the many resons is financial. People complain about medicare reimbursement, for peds most of your patients are medicaid which pays even less. Also, because it is such a small field if you do a fellowship(with the exception of neonatology) you are limiting yourself to almost exclusive academic careers as your not going to open a peds nephro practice on your own...the patients just aren't there. If your in medicine for the money, why do peds cardio and make 160,000 when you can do adult and make double that(i am not in it for the money, just explaining some of the thinking people have)


http://www.nrmp.org/data/resultsanddatasms2010.pdf

these are the 2010 results. Some of the subspecialties are not listed because they do not participate in a match.


do you have to do a md peds residency or can you do a do peds residency to be eligible for pediatric fellowships?

you can do an aoa (only) residency, but it would may make it a little bit harder for you to match into since there are only a dozen aoa programs in the country. There used to be some aoa fellowships, i am not sure if they exist anymore. Since some of the peds fellowships have difficulty getting enough applicants, depending on where you apply i am sure an aoa residency would not hinder you in any way.

how many unfilled ped fellowships were there after the match process?

look at the link i put above.

This one gives details over the past several years:
http://www.nrmp.org/data/programresultssms2005-2009.pdf

very helpful!! Muchos gracias to you too!
 

J-Rad

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If one's considering A/I... is the pay discrepancy the same as in Peds/Adult cardio? I'm assuming A/Is treat both populations since the fellowship is the same from IM or Peds.
If one's considering A/I... is the pay discrepancy the same as in Peds/Adult cardio? I'm assuming A/Is treat both populations since the fellowship is the same from IM or Peds.
It depends on how your practice is tailored. An AI is an AI. There is not really such a thing a peds AI or adult AI. You can do the fellowship from peds or IM but it's the same fellowship so your other fellows may be pediatricians or internists; you'll all learn the same thing. Most AI practices are going to be a mix of peds and adult patients. The better the payor mix (better private>>Medicaid/Medicare), the better the pay will be. Someone who chooses to work at a children's hospital is likely (with some exceptions) going to tailor their practice to seeing peds patients only which will drive overall reimbursement down (more medicaid)
 

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I think for the Primary Care Scholars program they r considering Family Med, Pediatrics and Internal Medicine as primary care. The primary purpose of the program is get students to go into Family Medicine. They already have the residency sites that the students who graduate from this program r supposed to do thier residency. When I interviewed there I asked one of the professors if someone could do this program and still go into primary care, but complete thier residency at hospitals other than the one's set up by Lecom. His answer was that, it would be difficult bcuz most hospitals will probably question the program and because it's 3 years you really can't do any sort of research to boost your apps for higher caliber primary care residency programs. Also when you do the program you get a scholarship equivalent to one year's tuition, if you specialize you have to pay Lecom thier money back. Also, students r not admitted to the program until they complete Anatomy during thier first year at LECOM. So it's really not guaranteed that u'll get accepted into the program.
 

punkiedad

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I think for the Primary Care Scholars program they r considering Family Med, Pediatrics and Internal Medicine as primary care. The primary purpose of the program is get students to go into Family Medicine. They already have the residency sites that the students who graduate from this program r supposed to do thier residency. When I interviewed there I asked one of the professors if someone could do this program and still go into primary care, but complete thier residency at hospitals other than the one's set up by Lecom. His answer was that, it would be difficult bcuz most hospitals will probably question the program and because it's 3 years you really can't do any sort of research to boost your apps for higher caliber primary care residency programs. Also when you do the program you get a scholarship equivalent to one year's tuition, if you specialize you have to pay Lecom thier money back. Also, students r not admitted to the program until they complete Anatomy during thier first year at LECOM. So it's really not guaranteed that u'll get accepted into the program.
A couple points of clarification:

True - you cannotenter into the pathway from the beginning. There are a series of meetings during the first 12 weeks of anatomy where everyone gets to know each other. Selection is made then. The process works well and has shown beneficial on both ends.

False - residencies are local only. First class of 3 students is graduating this May. All three matched to their first choice. None are staying local. One is going to Dallas, Tx another is going to Washington, PA and another to Buffalo, NY

As a side note, none of them were discouraged in places they interviewed at. As a matter of fact they said that most places were interested in them because of their pathway and heard no negatives.