nature4me

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I like pediatric pulmonology but I don't like the whole pediatrics field! (just respiration!).
Is there any where that I can bypass 3 years of general pediatrics residency and directly go for pediatric pulmonology?
I have heard that in some countries you can study an internal medicine subspecialty directly as a residency program; for example you can go directly for oncology.
is there such a thing for pediatrics too?
does anyone know anything about it?
 
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J-Rad

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(In smallest, almost unreadable font) No, not if you want to be a pediatric pulmonologist in the US. However, if allergy/immunology/asthma is of interest, one may become an A&I specialist from either internal medicine or pediatrics and the field of A&I is all-ages
 

oldbearprofessor

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I like the "respiratory diseases" subspecialty of pediatrics
but I don't like the whole pediatrics feild! (just respiration!).
Is there any where that I can bypass 3 years of general pediatrics studying and directly go for pediatrics respiratory subspecialty?
I have heard that in some countries you can study an internal medicine subspecialty directly as a residency program; for example you go directly for oncology with no need for 4 years of internal medicine as a must!
is there such a thing for pediatrics too?
does anyone know anything about it?
regards
Please try to post using a standard font size. Us "oldbears" don't see so good anymore.:cool:

In any case, pediatric pulmonology is a supbspecialty of pediatrics and in the United States, you must complete your pediatric training before beginning training in this specialty. It is a three year fellowship like almost all pediatric fellowships. There is no way around it.

Many pediatric specialties include a substantial component of respiratory system care, including neonatology, pediatric critical care and to some degree pediatric cardiology. As noted by J-Rad, Allergy and immunology is an independent fellowship that can be done after either pediatrics or internal medicine.

Now, more generally, I would give you the advice I give others who ask similar questions. If you are going to be a pediatric pulmonologist, you won't primarily be doing general pediatric type things. It's quite possible to not like well baby/child visits, gastro, etc and still be a happy camper as a pedi specialist. However, if you are truly allergic to the idea of spending three years in pediatric residency seeing these patients, then I recommend another field. You'll be too unhappy before you get to fellowship.

I would say though that even though I was quite certain of my interest in neo when I started residency, except for adolescent medicine (and to a lesser degree EM), I enjoyed most of my non-neonatology pedi residency time knowing it wasn't what I would be doing for a career.
 

Dr 14220

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Please try to post using a standard font size. Us "oldbears" don't see so good anymore.:cool:

In any case, pediatric pulmonology is a supbspecialty of pediatrics and in the United States, you must complete your pediatric training before beginning training in this specialty. It is a three year fellowship like almost all pediatric fellowships. There is no way around it.

Many pediatric specialties include a substantial component of respiratory system care, including neonatology, pediatric critical care and to some degree pediatric cardiology. As noted by J-Rad, Allergy and immunology is an independent fellowship that can be done after either pediatrics or internal medicine.

Now, more generally, I would give you the advice I give others who ask similar questions. If you are going to be a pediatric pulmonologist, you won't primarily be doing general pediatric type things. It's quite possible to not like well baby/child visits, gastro, etc and still be a happy camper as a pedi specialist. However, if you are truly allergic to the idea of spending three years in pediatric residency seeing these patients, then I recommend another field. You'll be too unhappy before you get to fellowship.

I would say though that even though I was quite certain of my interest in neo when I started residency, except for adolescent medicine (and to a lesser degree EM), I enjoyed most of my non-neonatology pedi residency time knowing it wasn't what I would be doing for a career.
what was it about those areas that you didn't care for??
 

oldbearprofessor

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Stitch

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nature4me

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as a compensation for the previous small fonts,I should say:
thank you dear professor!
Please try to post using a standard font size. Us "oldbears" don't see so good anymore.:cool:

In any case, pediatric pulmonology is a supbspecialty of pediatrics and in the United States, you must complete your pediatric training before beginning training in this specialty. It is a three year fellowship like almost all pediatric fellowships. There is no way around it.

Many pediatric specialties include a substantial component of respiratory system care, including neonatology, pediatric critical care and to some degree pediatric cardiology. As noted by J-Rad, Allergy and immunology is an independent fellowship that can be done after either pediatrics or internal medicine.

Now, more generally, I would give you the advice I give others who ask similar questions. If you are going to be a pediatric pulmonologist, you won't primarily be doing general pediatric type things. It's quite possible to not like well baby/child visits, gastro, etc and still be a happy camper as a pedi specialist. However, if you are truly allergic to the idea of spending three years in pediatric residency seeing these patients, then I recommend another field. You'll be too unhappy before you get to fellowship.

I would say though that even though I was quite certain of my interest in neo when I started residency, except for adolescent medicine (and to a lesser degree EM), I enjoyed most of my non-neonatology pedi residency time knowing it wasn't what I would be doing for a career.