curious monkey

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Does anybody have an idea of the general lifestyle and range of salaries available for Peds ICU docs? I've been told that that adult ICU docs are extremely busy and many burn out pretty quickly, is that the same for Peds ICU or is there a sense that they is a little more time to breathe. thanks
 

drmg456

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curious monkey said:
Does anybody have an idea of the general lifestyle and range of salaries available for Peds ICU docs? I've been told that that adult ICU docs are extremely busy and many burn out pretty quickly, is that the same for Peds ICU or is there a sense that they is a little more time to breathe. thanks

It depends where you want to work, in rural area, they are comfortable with a hospitalist and a MICU intensivist, PICU definitely guarentees you a higher salary than a Gen Peds, but for that you need to be taking calls q2 to q3, through out, and remember you are it, buck stops right down your nose!!!!!!
In metro the salariesof PICU are 130-170 range, calls q4h, Gen peds 120-140, calls q6-q7,

If you are thinking about money in Peds, Neonatology won't fail you, Peds ED has a good combination of acute medicine and lifestyle.
 

Homunculus

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it depends. i've rotated through a residency affiliated PICU where the attendings were 3d on (72 hrs straight), 6d off and cleared 300+k/yr. the bottom line is, with all specialties, it depends on if you are academic/private and how you are set up. if you are the only game in town, you're not gonna have issues with pt volume. academic institutions get paid less, but also have more time for research and time off-service.

generally, specialties you do procedures in (GI, cards, PICU/NICU) are going to pay more than the more cerebral (endo, renal, general) specialties. exceptions abound, but if you are looking at potential salaries it may be a place to start.

"burn-out" i think is more a function of personality than specialty. if you genuinely enjoy your job and coworkers, you'll be fine. if you go into something simply because the money is good you're in trouble.

--your friendly neighborhood fellowship pondering caveman
 

drmg456

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[My brother in Law is a Peds intensivist in NY, started with q3h, starting salary 130k, he is exploring the possibilities in the suburbs, offers of 180-200k are plenty, but he has to do the job of both NICU and PICU. Right now in an academic Ctr, he works just like a resident

QUOTE=Homunculus]it depends. i've rotated through a residency affiliated PICU where the attendings were 3d on (72 hrs straight), 6d off and cleared 300+k/yr. the bottom line is, with all specialties, it depends on if you are academic/private and how you are set up. if you are the only game in town, you're not gonna have issues with pt volume. academic institutions get paid less, but also have more time for research and time off-service.

generally, specialties you do procedures in (GI, cards, PICU/NICU) are going to pay more than the more cerebral (endo, renal, general) specialties. exceptions abound, but if you are looking at potential salaries it may be a place to start.

"burn-out" i think is more a function of personality than specialty. if you genuinely enjoy your job and coworkers, you'll be fine. if you go into something simply because the money is good you're in trouble.

.

--your friendly neighborhood fellowship pondering caveman[/QUOTE]
 
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