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PGY-1 -- help!

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ice712

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I didn't think of doing residency after graduation until a friend brought it up, saying there is no harm to try. I am a P4 student now and I have no involvement in those professional meetings/ leadership position in school organizations (I didn't think of residency at all!!)

Am I at a great disadvantage? Should I even try? I was told, they would grill you to death with all kinds of questions. I am VERY VERY suck at interviewing (not being humble, unfortunately)... and not as sharp at answering questions I am not prepared for...

Recommendation letters is another problem too...

Please help and give me some advice... Thank you all!
 

Genericrph2012

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Yiu should just drop out of pharmacy school and go to PA school. Byeeeeee

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Lnsean

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I didn't think of doing residency after graduation until a friend brought it up, saying there is no harm to try. I am a P4 student now and I have no involvement in those professional meetings/ leadership position in school organizations (I didn't think of residency at all!!)

Am I at a great disadvantage? Should I even try? I was told, they would grill you to death with all kinds of questions. I am VERY VERY suck at interviewing (not being humble, unfortunately)... and not as sharp at answering questions I am not prepared for...

Recommendation letters is another problem too...

Please help and give me some advice... Thank you all!

wth do you want people here to say? that's the consequence of doing things last minute and not being prepared. You already know what you got to do. Go out there and do it. That's all.
 
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lord999

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It's possible to scramble, but it's not a necessarily good thing as there's generally a good reason why a residency site is available during a scramble. And don't feel bad, we have some returners after a year or two in practice.
 

lcow2004

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I didn't think of doing residency after graduation until a friend brought it up, saying there is no harm to try. I am a P4 student now and I have no involvement in those professional meetings/ leadership position in school organizations (I didn't think of residency at all!!)

Am I at a great disadvantage? Should I even try? I was told, they would grill you to death with all kinds of questions. I am VERY VERY suck at interviewing (not being humble, unfortunately)... and not as sharp at answering questions I am not prepared for...

Recommendation letters is another problem too...

Please help and give me some advice... Thank you all!
I think it is still not too late to prepare but what is your reason for now wanting to do residency? This information would give us a better idea of how to help you...
 

trailerpark

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Just get a JOB ASAP.


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NCW2401

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Why do you want to do a residency? Is it just to escape retail? I worked at a hospital as a tech, then as an intern and now I work at the same hospital as a pharmacist. I joined no clubs in pharmacy school (in my opinion its just a bunch of brown nosing bull****). I had an offer as a floor pharmacist in the fall of my P4 year. Honestly, how much do you really learn through club nonsense...its mostly 20 year olds with no life experience looking for that resume fluff.
 
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ice712

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It's possible to scramble, but it's not a necessarily good thing as there's generally a good reason why a residency site is available during a scramble. And don't feel bad, we have some returners after a year or two in practice.

Really? They do return? I guess very small portion of people... I kindna thought about that too, just in case I don't like what I will be doing after graduating but I don't know if that is practical.
 

ice712

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I think it is still not too late to prepare but what is your reason for now wanting to do residency? This information would give us a better idea of how to help you...

To be honest, the main reason is to gain more knowledge; even with 4 years of pharmacy school, I don't feel like a competent pharmacist. I feel like putting things into real practice will help me comprehend stuff better. Maybe you would say rotations are places for us to do so, but I haven't had any good rotation sites; they helped but not as much as I would expect.
 

ice712

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Why do you want to do a residency? Is it just to escape retail? I worked at a hospital as a tech, then as an intern and now I work at the same hospital as a pharmacist. I joined no clubs in pharmacy school (in my opinion its just a bunch of brown nosing bull****). I had an offer as a floor pharmacist in the fall of my P4 year. Honestly, how much do you really learn through club nonsense...its mostly 20 year olds with no life experience looking for that resume fluff.

Exactly! I don't think we learn stuff from clubs ... that's why I wasn't involved much. But I have been told again and gain the importance about networking, knowing people...

I feel like if I do a residency, I will know more and have more opportunities. Retails are pretty tough now. One angry customer ruins the whole day.
 

NCW2401

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Exactly! I don't think we learn stuff from clubs ... that's why I wasn't involved much. But I have been told again and gain the importance about networking, knowing people...

I feel like if I do a residency, I will know more and have more opportunities. Retails are pretty tough now. One angry customer ruins the whole day.
I will say that networking is key. I don't really know how much clubs in school can really help with that out the door. You're all going to be looking for jobs. I have yet to meet a pharmacist (aside from bull**** academics) that care about clubs. Its all about work history and just getting **** done.
 
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NCW2401

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Exactly! I don't think we learn stuff from clubs ... that's why I wasn't involved much. But I have been told again and gain the importance about networking, knowing people...

I feel like if I do a residency, I will know more and have more opportunities. Retails are pretty tough now. One angry customer ruins the whole day.
Most hospitals do not require a residency for a staff position. Pretty much the same pay as someone that went through a residency (aka someone who is butt hurt they couldn't get into med school)
 

NCW2401

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Exactly! I don't think we learn stuff from clubs ... that's why I wasn't involved much. But I have been told again and gain the importance about networking, knowing people...

I feel like if I do a residency, I will know more and have more opportunities. Retails are pretty tough now. One angry customer ruins the whole day.
You will know more by working. Its not like you magically become a genius because you did a year of residency.
 

NCW2401

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wth do you want people here to say? that's the consequence of doing things last minute and not being prepared. You already know what you got to do. Go out there and do it. That's all.
I bet you are a bundle full of joy to work with
 

gwarm01

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Really? They do return? I guess very small portion of people... I kindna thought about that too, just in case I don't like what I will be doing after graduating but I don't know if that is practical.
I've known people who were working inpatient hospital who left after a few years to do a residency then came back to work at the same hospital. It seemed silly to me to give up money if you aren't getting any tangible benefit from it. I think they felt it was a prestige thing, but there really is no prestige in pharmacy regardless of your position.

A PGY1 is basically a way to get an entry-level staffing position now anyway, so if you already have that why bother? It only makes sense if you plan to do a PGY2 in an area you are very interested in, then you go out and get that job.


To be honest, the main reason is to gain more knowledge; even with 4 years of pharmacy school, I don't feel like a competent pharmacist. I feel like putting things into real practice will help me comprehend stuff better. Maybe you would say rotations are places for us to do so, but I haven't had any good rotation sites; they helped but not as much as I would expect.
We had a resident finish his PGY1 that was telling people he felt like he needed to do a PGY2 just because he didn't feel ready to work yet. The guy was saying this to people who were brought on fresh out of school and were trained on the job. It was so silly. You'll never feel confident until you get out there and do it.
 
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ldiot

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I'm still torn whether or not I should do a residency. It's of no financial benefit and I can see myself working in retail, and I don't really care about having a clinical job or "prestige" but at the same I don't want to lock myself out of an entire sector of pharmacy in the event I want a hospital job 10 years from now or work prn for a hospital.

I know residency isn't required for a lot of these jobs but at the same time why would they hire a retail pharmacist when they have 20 applications from residency students who have their CV loaded with all the fluff.

Residency was supposed to prepare pharmacists for new emerging roles. So far it seems more like residency has just become a requirement to get jobs that already existed anyways. Kind of pointless and the general type of people that are sold on residencies just seem to annoy me in general for some reason, lol.
 
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beautifulrobot

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Your school should have resources (like a writing center or career center) to help you with interviewing skills and personal statement and resume writing skills, which will help you not just with applying to residencies but applying to jobs in general. There's still enough time to reach out to faculty, preceptors, etc. and develop a good enough relationship with them to get your letters of recommendation. If you aren't an awful student, most professors will be happy to help you - it looks good for them and the school when they have more students that are accepted into residency programs. If you can't get any professors to write you a letter of recommendation, that is a much better indicator of whether you should apply for a residency than anything anyone at SDN can give you.
 

ice712

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I'm still torn whether or not I should do a residency. It's of no financial benefit and I can see myself working in retail, and I don't really care about having a clinical job or "prestige" but at the same I don't want to lock myself out of an entire sector of pharmacy in the event I want a hospital job 10 years from now or work prn for a hospital.

I know residency isn't required for a lot of these jobs but at the same time why would they hire a retail pharmacist when they have 20 applications from residency students who have their CV loaded with all the fluff.

Residency was supposed to prepare pharmacists for new emerging roles. So far it seems more like residency has just become a requirement to get jobs that already existed anyways. Kind of pointless and the general type of people that are sold on residencies just seem to annoy me in general for some reason, lol.

Totally agreed. Residency is now like a master degree that it looks like everyone should have if they want a promotion later on....
 
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ice712

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Your school should have resources (like a writing center or career center) to help you with interviewing skills and personal statement and resume writing skills, which will help you not just with applying to residencies but applying to jobs in general. There's still enough time to reach out to faculty, preceptors, etc. and develop a good enough relationship with them to get your letters of recommendation. If you aren't an awful student, most professors will be happy to help you - it looks good for them and the school when they have more students that are accepted into residency programs. If you can't get any professors to write you a letter of recommendation, that is a much better indicator of whether you should apply for a residency than anything anyone at SDN can give you.

I guess I worry about recommendation letter is that I am more of a "quiet" person; I didn't ask a lot of questions in class so not much attention was drawn. I wonder how they would write the rec if they agreed to do it; I mean if it is not a good rec, I guess it is no point to ask (I was told, a not-so-good rec is like an automatic rejection :( )
 

ldiot

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I guess I worry about recommendation letter is that I am more of a "quiet" person; I didn't ask a lot of questions in class so not much attention was drawn. I wonder how they would write the rec if they agreed to do it; I mean if it is not a good rec, I guess it is no point to ask (I was told, a not-so-good rec is like an automatic rejection :( )

Do most residencies require one from faculty? Could you try to pull one from a preceptor or pharmacists at your place of employment?

I don't even go to class so I'd be in the same boat unless I asked a lab instructor or preceptor

If you have rotations left load up on hospitals that offer residencies and clinical work and make a good impression/express interest. They will put a face to the name and this could help you significantly.
 

beautifulrobot

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I guess I worry about recommendation letter is that I am more of a "quiet" person; I didn't ask a lot of questions in class so not much attention was drawn. I wonder how they would write the rec if they agreed to do it; I mean if it is not a good rec, I guess it is no point to ask (I was told, a not-so-good rec is like an automatic rejection :( )


Here's what you do - think about a professor whose lectures you enjoyed and found interesting, or look at the bios of the school faculty on the school's website and find someone who has had a career path that seems most interesting to you. Then, email that professor something along the lines of, "Hello Dr. so-and-so, I don't know if you remember me, but I am a P4 student, and I really enjoyed your lectures on blah-blah. As I reflect back on my time in pharmacy school and on my future plans, I realize I am interested in pursuing a residency, but still have questions I am trying to figure out. I would really appreciate meeting with you and gaining your insight on residency training. Could you please tell me what your office hours are or when would be a good time for us to meet in the next few weeks? Respectfully, ice712 ak.a. the person who pays a good chunk of your salary" (don't actually include that last part)

After meeting with this professor and having a conversation with them, share with them your concern about getting a letter of recommendation, and see what they say. Maybe they have a mini-project you can help them with that will give them a better idea of what kind of person you are, and then they will feel comfortable writing you a good letter of recommendation. If someone agrees to write you a letter of recommendation and you are not confident it will be a good letter, ask them what kind of letter they plan to write - you don't have to wonder, you can ask, that's totally a reasonable question.

Even if you don't end up doing a residency, building skills in networking and developing relationships will take you far in your career. No one gets anywhere in life without the support of other people in one way or another. Now is the time to practice those skills (i.e. to mess up, be awkward, and learn from your mistakes), while you're still in school. You don't have to be a super extrovert all the time, but challenging yourself to go out of your comfort zone every now and then is usually well worth the risk.
 
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sunakuma

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Even if you don't end up doing a residency, building skills in networking and developing relationships will take you far in your career. No one gets anywhere in life without the support of other people in one way or another. Now is the time to practice those skills (i.e. to mess up, be awkward, and learn from your mistakes), while you're still in school. You don't have to be a super extrovert all the time, but challenging yourself to go out of your comfort zone every now and then is usually well worth the risk.

Like this!
 

confettiflyer

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I did zero extracurricular involvement, just a lot of in-house work as a hospital intern.


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