shnisaka

5+ Year Member
Feb 9, 2013
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This is all hypothetical scenario that I came across as I was studying pharmacotherapy.

Assume you are the pharmacist, your technician sold a prescription on the register and the patient paid for it. It was your turn to counsel the patient. During counseling you realize this patient is going to abuse this drug in someway and with your best judgment you believe this drug is not suitable for the patient, you are holding the prescription in your hand.

Is there any laws that protects you in this situation and allows you not to give the prescription for the patient even though it is already sold? What if it was a non-controlled substance? anyone ran into a similar situation and decided not to give the prescription?
 

giga

U.S. Public Health Service
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Aug 23, 2005
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This is all hypothetical scenario that I came across as I was studying pharmacotherapy.

Assume you are the pharmacist, your technician sold a prescription on the register and the patient paid for it. It was your turn to counsel the patient. During counseling you realize this patient is going to abuse this drug in someway and with your best judgment you believe this drug is not suitable for the patient, you are holding the prescription in your hand.

Is there any laws that protects you in this situation and allows you not to give the prescription for the patient even though it is already sold? What if it was a non-controlled substance? anyone ran into a similar situation and decided not to give the prescription?
I haven't worked in a pharmacy with a cash register in a while... but, if I recall correctly, the patient first has to sign that they have been counseled before the transaction can be completed, so if the system is set up correctly, this situation shouldn't ever happen.
 

wagrxm2000

A different perspective
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Sep 17, 2014
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This is all hypothetical scenario that I came across as I was studying pharmacotherapy.

Assume you are the pharmacist, your technician sold a prescription on the register and the patient paid for it. It was your turn to counsel the patient. During counseling you realize this patient is going to abuse this drug in someway and with your best judgment you believe this drug is not suitable for the patient, you are holding the prescription in your hand.

Is there any laws that protects you in this situation and allows you not to give the prescription for the patient even though it is already sold? What if it was a non-controlled substance? anyone ran into a similar situation and decided not to give the prescription?
Stop judging people by how they look.
 
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giga

U.S. Public Health Service
10+ Year Member
Aug 23, 2005
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Pharmacist
On second thought, if the patient asks to speak to the pharmacist after the transaction is completed, and the patient is like, "hey, if I take all of these pills at once, will that be enough for me to die?" I am pretty sure you would be justified in confiscating the medications and calling 911 or the on-site mental health crisis team if available.
 

steveysmith54

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Dec 29, 2005
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sounds like a corporate complaint waiting to happen. JK. It's a sensitive situation that is handled on a case by case. Luckily, I haven't been in this situation before. If it was a new RX, i'd call the provider and document it and go from there.
 

BidingMyTime

Lost Shaker Of Salt
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Oct 2, 2006
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I would give them a refund. Obviously, if you are still holding the prescription, the transaction hadn't been completed, and if in your professional judgement, it would be harmful to give the prescription to the patient, then just give htem their money back.

Edited to fix funny typo, I meant give them a refund, not a refill!
 
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CetiAlphaFive

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Apr 12, 2016
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Pharmacist
This is all hypothetical scenario that I came across as I was studying pharmacotherapy.

Assume you are the pharmacist, your technician sold a prescription on the register and the patient paid for it. It was your turn to counsel the patient. During counseling you realize this patient is going to abuse this drug in someway and with your best judgment you believe this drug is not suitable for the patient, you are holding the prescription in your hand.

Is there any laws that protects you in this situation and allows you not to give the prescription for the patient even though it is already sold? What if it was a non-controlled substance? anyone ran into a similar situation and decided not to give the prescription?
If the transaction is already complete, you

1.) Dial 911
2.) Call your local DEA field office
3.) DOCUMENT everything
4.) Report prescriber to their board
5') DOCUMENT everything and keep copies where you can access than no matter what
 
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owlegrad

Uncontrollable Sarcasm Machine
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Pharmacist
This is all hypothetical scenario that I came across as I was studying pharmacotherapy.

Assume you are the pharmacist, your technician sold a prescription on the register and the patient paid for it. It was your turn to counsel the patient. During counseling you realize this patient is going to abuse this drug in someway and with your best judgment you believe this drug is not suitable for the patient, you are holding the prescription in your hand.

Is there any laws that protects you in this situation and allows you not to give the prescription for the patient even though it is already sold? What if it was a non-controlled substance? anyone ran into a similar situation and decided not to give the prescription?
For some reason I love this question. You are going to make a great pharmacist. I know many pharmacists you would get along great with.

You want a law that specifically says it is ok to give a refund on a prescription that your pharmacy has sold but has never left the possession of the pharmacy after the pharmacist decides that it is going to be abused. No, I do not think most states have laws that specific. I assume you also want a law that says it is ok to change a recommendation after the fact provided that new information comes to light?
 
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