pharmacy schools that dont require

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Drrrrrr. Celty

Osteo Dullahan
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calc..

im still debating which health position im fully interested in

however i've done tons of research and most say that pharmacy schools require not just recommend calc 1 and 2..
which idk seems weird ... is there any practical use of calc in pharmacy?

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calc..

im still debating which health position im fully interested in

however i've done tons of research and most say that pharmacy schools require not just recommend calc 1 and 2..
which idk seems weird ... is there any practical use of calc in pharmacy?

Yes and no. A lot of pharmacokinetic calculations involve calculus. However, you don't actually have to do the derivation or integration in those classes. It just helps a lot to know the concepts behind the equations/charts.
 
Most schools only require Calc 1. Just take it so that you have a lot more options.

By the way, I don't think there are any pharmacy schools that do not require Calc. Correct me if i'm wrong.
 
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I'm very bad at math, but I would consider it one of the easier pre-pharmacy courses. Try baby stepping your way into calculus by taking (or retaking) trig and pre-calculus. I don't know anyone who's put time and effort into doing their homework do bad in calculus. It's usually just the lazy students that fail math.
 
I'm very bad at math, but I would consider it one of the easier pre-pharmacy courses. Try baby stepping your way into calculus by taking (or retaking) trig and pre-calculus. I don't know anyone who's put time and effort into doing their homework do bad in calculus. It's usually just the lazy students that fail math.

What if it's been nearly nine years since you've had algebra? :rolleyes:
 
What if it's been nearly nine years since you've had algebra? :rolleyes:

Well then you could find a math tutor or a math major to help you when you take calculus. I had a friend in high school who was in pre-calc, but he wanted to take the AP Calculus AB exam, so he studied with friends in AP Calc until the AP exam the whole year and got a 4 on the AP exam. So I'd say it's doable if you stay committed and focused.

As for Calculus in pharmacy school, I personally haven't had to use it so far, and I'm not sure how much of it I'll use next year in pharmacokinetics, but it helps a bit on the PCAT since they estimate 22% of the math section to be from calculus.
 
I took calc I in high school and just recently took calc II (my last year of college) and I was scared to death before taking it. Butttt...it turned out fine! I just spent 15 dollars on "calc for dummies", reviewed basic calc I, worked hard, and passed calc II at my university with an A.

Also, don't know if this applies to OP, but try taking calc right before the pcat, it definitely helped me since so much of the math on the pcat can be solved with simple calculus.

good luck with whatever career you decide upon
 
Calc isn't that bad. Personally I would say take and open your options to a wide variety of schools.
 
The field of pharmacy is evolving fast and knowing the basics of calculus not only provides a good foundation for kinetics and physics, but it also helps you to approach problems from a variety of ways. The nice thing about math is that there is usually several ways to solve a problem correctly. Problem solving is a big must for future pharmacists.
 
The field of pharmacy is evolving fast and knowing the basics of calculus not only provides a good foundation for kinetics and physics, but it also helps you to approach problems from a variety of ways. The nice thing about math is that there is usually several ways to solve a problem correctly. Problem solving is a big must for future pharmacists.

:thumbup:

If your school has a nuclear pharmacy course in the curriculum, you'll be using calculus.
 
calc..

im still debating which health position im fully interested in

however i've done tons of research and most say that pharmacy schools require not just recommend calc 1 and 2..
which idk seems weird ... is there any practical use of calc in pharmacy?

To add to this... why not ask whether there is any practical use of any of the pre-req's for pharmacy?

Majority of it you'll either relearn in the first year of pharmacy, or you'll forget.

Think you'll use much of the intro-chem material in real life? You only use the dilution equation when working in a laboratory setting.

The use of any class you take as an undergraduate is just for knowledge. Pure intellectual knowledge, to expand your horizons.

This is why I took every chemistry class offered at my university (with corresponding lab components, IN THE REAL WORLD YOU DON'T WRITE THOSE SAME CRAPPY LAB REPORTS). I took tons of religions courses, sociology courses, philosophy courses, etc. during my 4 years as an undergrad. Did I even need any of those for "pharmacy" or anything? NO.

But it sure was interesting while in school.
 
How'd you like it? Chemistry for Dummies is great. I'm reading it now.

I've also read Golf for Dummies. ;)

it was very helpful! very simplified, but had a basic coverage of all of calc I and that was enough to remember all the general rules and derivatives/integrals. i definitely recommend it for a review.
 
it was very helpful! very simplified, but had a basic coverage of all of calc I and that was enough to remember all the general rules and derivatives/integrals. i definitely recommend it for a review.

Cool. Thanks. I've never been very mathy so maybe it'll work for me when I get to that point. :xf:
 
There's many resources to get you through calc which include tutoring, the video tutorials that come with some books, and other resources that you can find online. Finding a friend in engineering to help you think through problems helps a ton too! (that's what I did for physics and calc)
 
All schools vary. Some schools, like St. John University in NYC would not even require students to take the PCAT.
 
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