Aug 17, 2017
1
1
Status
Pre-Pharmacy
Until recently, I was just going to apply to in-state schools, but now I'm being more serious about tuition. California, I love you, but your costs. Why. I'm trying to narrow down my list, but I'm currently at 121 schools. Cry. I'm looking into schools with a low GPA requirement (2.7-2.8).

I'm still going to do my research, but if there are any schools with red flags, I would love to know. I'm already avoiding pre-candidate/candidate schools. Thank you!
 
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Peterpiper1

2+ Year Member
Mar 6, 2017
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63
Just look at their NAPLEX passing rate and residency match stats, the higher the better for both. You can usually find them on the school's website. As far as specific schools to avoid, just look out for brand new schools without much history (i.e. Larkin in Miami), and For-Profit schools, other than that they're all pretty solid. If you're looking into schools with low GPA requirements I have to assume your grades aren't the best. Now that's okay because most schools take people with 2.0's, but really think about whether you'll be able to stand the rigors of pharmacy school because it will be tough if you struggled with your core sciences and math.
Now that I've answered your question I feel it's my duty as a pharmacy student to tell you to please make sure this is what you really want to do and not because you saw the salary figures for Pharmacist and think it's an easy way to make money. I might be giving you unsolicited advice, but if you're smart you're best bet would be not to go into pharmacy at all.
I would consider PA, DO, Dentistry, Engineering, Computer Science, or even a masters program before pharmacy at this point. There are simply no jobs out there right now and with more and more graduates it's only going to get worse. Most of us are graduating 4 years older, with 200000+ debt and no job to repay it. If you do happen to find a job, you're every move will be scrutinized. It is not uncommon to hear of pharmacist getting fired on their first day just for them to bring in the next recent grad.
I'm sorry for the doom and gloom but it's only right to warn people before its too late.
 
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CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
4,128
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Pharmacist
Until recently, I was just going to apply to in-state schools, but now I'm being more serious about tuition. California, I love you, but your costs. Why. I'm trying to narrow down my list, but I'm currently at 121 schools. Cry. I'm looking into schools with a low GPA requirement (2.7-2.8).
I'm still going to do my research, but if there are any schools with red flags, I would love to know. I'm already avoiding pre-candidate/candidate schools. Thank you!
Usually schools that you want to avoid are the ones that would take someone with a low GPA.

You can't have your cake and eat it too.
 
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Hohohee1

2+ Year Member
Oct 20, 2015
312
64
Just look at their NAPLEX passing rate and residency match stats, the higher the better for both. You can usually find them on the school's website. As far as specific schools to avoid, just look out for brand new schools without much history (i.e. Larkin in Miami), and For-Profit schools, other than that they're all pretty solid. If you're looking into schools with low GPA requirements I have to assume your grades aren't the best. Now that's okay because most schools take people with 2.0's, but really think about whether you'll be able to stand the rigors of pharmacy school because it will be tough if you struggled with your core sciences and math.
Now that I've answered your question I feel it's my duty as a pharmacy student to tell you to please make sure this is what you really want to do and not because you saw the salary figures for Pharmacist and think it's an easy way to make money. I might be giving you unsolicited advice, but if you're smart you're best bet would be not to go into pharmacy at all.
I would consider PA, DO, Dentistry, Engineering, Computer Science, or even a masters program before pharmacy at this point. There are simply no jobs out there right now and with more and more graduates it's only going to get worse. Most of us are graduating 4 years older, with 200000+ debt and no job to repay it. If you do happen to find a job, you're every move will be scrutinized. It is not uncommon to hear of pharmacist getting fired on their first day just for them to bring in the next recent grad.
I'm sorry for the doom and gloom but it's only right to warn people before its too late.
are you stoichiometrist ?
 

Blizzard1mage

5+ Year Member
Apr 4, 2012
403
66
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121 schools? By what criteria are you looking for schools? For most people, where they want to live is a top consideration - maybe start there. Or perhaps cost, as it sounds like a main concern for you.
 
P

Pharmacy Princess

Awesome! try for the best schools with high NAPLEX pass rate (how can you practice if you cant pass right? :smuggrin:) but besides stats... narrow it down to cost, required pcat scores (or not), experience required etc.
Usually a school with low GPA requirements is something to avoid :nailbiting:..... no matter how close it is too home!
Lots of singing birds and woodland creatures,
The Princess... I mean Future Pharmacist :whistle:
 
Mar 7, 2018
46
11
Status
Pre-Health (Field Undecided)
Until recently, I was just going to apply to in-state schools, but now I'm being more serious about tuition. California, I love you, but your costs. Why. I'm trying to narrow down my list, but I'm currently at 121 schools. Cry. I'm looking into schools with a low GPA requirement (2.7-2.8).

I'm still going to do my research, but if there are any schools with red flags, I would love to know. I'm already avoiding pre-candidate/candidate schools. Thank you!
Hey what was your final school list?
 

Faustian

2+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2017
63
71
Status
Medical Student
Just look at their NAPLEX passing rate and residency match stats, the higher the better for both. You can usually find them on the school's website. As far as specific schools to avoid, just look out for brand new schools without much history (i.e. Larkin in Miami), and For-Profit schools, other than that they're all pretty solid. If you're looking into schools with low GPA requirements I have to assume your grades aren't the best. Now that's okay because most schools take people with 2.0's, but really think about whether you'll be able to stand the rigors of pharmacy school because it will be tough if you struggled with your core sciences and math.
Now that I've answered your question I feel it's my duty as a pharmacy student to tell you to please make sure this is what you really want to do and not because you saw the salary figures for Pharmacist and think it's an easy way to make money. I might be giving you unsolicited advice, but if you're smart you're best bet would be not to go into pharmacy at all.
I would consider PA, DO, Dentistry, Engineering, Computer Science, or even a masters program before pharmacy at this point. There are simply no jobs out there right now and with more and more graduates it's only going to get worse. Most of us are graduating 4 years older, with 200000+ debt and no job to repay it. If you do happen to find a job, you're every move will be scrutinized. It is not uncommon to hear of pharmacist getting fired on their first day just for them to bring in the next recent grad.
I'm sorry for the doom and gloom but it's only right to warn people before its too late.
OP is looking into schools with low gpa requirements for a reason. Advising to go DO or dentistry...you know our requirements are at least 3.3+ right? I’m speaking as a DO student. The gpa repair would take years of further investment. I know pharmacy is a tough market to be in, but I’ve got family members working and going through the school as well. They have or will find jobs as long as they’re willing to compromise on location and work up.

P.S. This doesn’t even account for having to take the MCAT and DAT which are much different animals than the PCAT. I know a student that decided to go dentistry and was 98% on the PCAT. You need some serious passion and commitment if you want to be a physician. That’s just the truth.

TL;DR- Go pharmacy OP and take any job afterwards, gain experience, and work your way to a hospital job.
 

CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
4,128
4,579
Status
Pharmacist
OP is looking into schools with low gpa requirements for a reason. Advising to go DO or dentistry...you know our requirements are at least 3.3+ right? I’m speaking as a DO student. The gpa repair would take years of further investment. I know pharmacy is a tough market to be in, but I’ve got family members working and going through the school as well. They have or will find jobs as long as they’re willing to compromise on location and work up.

P.S. This doesn’t even account for having to take the MCAT and DAT which are much different animals than the PCAT. I know a student that decided to go dentistry and was 98% on the PCAT. You need some serious passion and commitment if you want to be a physician. That’s just the truth.

TL;DR- Go pharmacy OP and take any job afterwards, gain experience, and work your way to a hospital job.
You guys take the MCAT too?
Weird
 

Faustian

2+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2017
63
71
Status
Medical Student
You guys take the MCAT too?
Weird
How so? You know DOs are also doctors right?

It’s like saying there’s a difference between an RPh and a PharmD or a DDS and a DMD.

I’m not going to debate the whole MD/DO thing because it’s overdone on SDN. I’m just going to advocate that you search it and draw the right conclusions.
 
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CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
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Pharmacist
How so? You know DOs are also doctors right?
It’s like saying there’s a difference between an RPh and a PharmD or a DDS and a DMD.
I’m not going to debate the whole MD/DO thing because it’s overdone on SDN. I’m just going to advocate that you search it and draw the right conclusions.
I thought you guys were chiropractors who then took extra classes and became real doctors.
You know, like DMDs

Thanks for letting me know; I googled it and learned the difference.

Btw:

When I was vice president of a pre-pharmacy Association back in the day, we always told people they needed a 3.5 to be competitive and a minimum 85 percentile.

The standards have fallen really far.
 

Faustian

2+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2017
63
71
Status
Medical Student
I thought you guys were chiropractors who then took extra classes and became real doctors.
You know, like DMDs

Thanks for letting me know; I googled it and learned the difference.

Btw:

When I was vice president of a pre-pharmacy Association back in the day, we always told people they needed a 3.5 to be competitive and a minimum 85 percentile.

The standards have fallen really far.
You might want to google that again. DMDs have always been true dentists. It was an equivalent degree coined by Harvard. It’s now offered at many other dental schools as well.


I’m not sure if you’re just trolling at this point, but I’ll give benefit of the doubt.

I say 3.3+ but it’s not a quick and fast cutoff. Usually these candidates are outstanding in other aspects that compensate such as higher MCAT scores, master’s degree, significant life experience, etc.

The standards between DO and MD have been merging for decades now.

You could say standards have fallen far, but I’ll respectfully disagree in regards to medical students per my experience. Many pre-med students take on very challenging course work prior to medical school (which may result in a lower gpa) or get burned by the MCAT. Some of these people end up outperforming the mean in medical school, ace their boards, and match competitive residencies. Several studies show that the MCAT isn’t as indicative of success in medical school as prior challenging life experience (Per adcoms at my school).

I hope you’ll at least consider that if standards are lower in any particular sector, it’s pharmacy. I know of schools that don’t require a PCAT and only high GPA. When I was a tech I worked with other techs who failed the pharmacy technician exam and are now pharmacy interns. Personally by the end of first semester I could answer NAPLEX questions that a third year pharmacy student struggled with. He happens to be at least top quarter of his class.

My point here is that it’s an unfair comparison to say standards have fallen if you’re only looking at medical students. The above examples are recent instances that lead me to believe that your profession needs stricter guidelines for evaluating its applicants. At least medical students are only allowed to move forward after passing (3) board exams starting after second year and obtaining+ completing residency. Fail one exam three times and you’re probably going to be exited anyway. This applies both MD/DO. You can still become a pharmacist because you can graduate and you’ve got 5 chances to pass the NAPLEX. It’s an entirely different game.

Feel free to PM me if you'd like to continue this discussion. I just don’t want to detract from the original topic any further.

Don’t get me wrong. I respect the pharmacy profession. It’s putting me through medical school and great pharmacists will always be necessary imo.

I just think that whatever health profession you are you should know about the credentials and abilities of the other professions. Be informed, so you disseminate correct information to patients who trust you to know more than they do.
 
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CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
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Pharmacist
You might want to google that again. DMDs have always been true dentists. It was an equivalent degree coined by Harvard. It’s now offered at many other dental schools as well.


I’m not sure if you’re just trolling at this point, but I’ll give benefit of the doubt.

I say 3.3+ but it’s not a quick and fast cutoff. Usually these candidates are outstanding in other aspects that compensate such as higher MCAT scores, master’s degree, significant life experience, etc.

The standards between DO and MD have been merging for decades now.

You could say standards have fallen far, but I’ll respectfully disagree in regards to medical students per my experience. Many pre-med students take on very challenging course work prior to medical school (which may result in a lower gpa) or get burned by the MCAT. Some of these people end up outperforming the mean in medical school, ace their boards, and match competitive residencies. Several studies show that the MCAT isn’t as indicative of success in medical school as prior challenging life experience (Per adcoms at my school).

I hope you’ll at least consider that if standards are lower in any particular sector, it’s pharmacy. I know of schools that don’t require a PCAT and only high GPA. When I was a tech I worked with other techs who failed the pharmacy technician exam and are now pharmacy interns. Personally by the end of first semester I could answer NAPLEX questions that a third year pharmacy student struggled with.

Feel free to PM me if you'd like to continue this discussion. I just don’t want to detract from the original topic any further.

Don’t get me wrong. I respect the pharmacy profession. It’s putting me through medical school and great pharmacists will always be necessary imo.

I just think that whatever health profession you are you should know about the credentials and abilities of the other professions. Be informed, so you disseminate correct information to patients who trust you to know more than they do.
So you're saying you, someone who previously passed the NAPLEX, was only able to answer NAPLEX questions after taking a semester of real™ doctor® school?

How does that work?
 
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Faustian

2+ Year Member
Apr 28, 2017
63
71
Status
Medical Student
So you're saying you, someone who previously passed the NAPLEX, was only able to answer NAPLEX questions after taking a semester of real™ doctor® school?

How does that work?
I said I was able to answer NAPLEX practice test questions better than my n=1 third year pharmacy student. I won’t ever take the NAPLEX as I’m not an aspiring pharmacist. Hope that clears up the confusion.

I sense the sarcasm and offense. I should have known better than to try to share information on this part of SDN.

Dude, seriously. I wasn’t picking a fight. If you’re offended that a lowly 0.5 year medical student can demonstrate good test- taking skills and application of knowledge, then I don’t really know what to say except “there’s always someone better out there.” I’m not saying I’ve got the knowledge under my belt to best a pharmacist, but there’s a good chance I’ll get there in another decade or so. You chose pharmacy already. Don’t be upset that medical and dental students have the chops to outdo a lot of pharmacy students. It’s not because we’re smarter, it’s because our education and professional standards demand more.

Btw: Our medical school class has a PharmD and former third year pharmacy student. They’re excellent students.

TL;DR- chill. No one’s saying pharmacy isn’t hard to get through or a respectable profession.
 
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CetiAlphaFive

2+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2016
4,128
4,579
Status
Pharmacist
I said I was able to answer NAPLEX practice test questions better than my n=1 third year pharmacy student. I won’t ever take the NAPLEX as I’m not an aspiring pharmacist. Hope that clears up the confusion.

I sense the sarcasm and offense. I should have known better than to try to share information on this part of SDN.

Dude, seriously. I wasn’t picking a fight. If you’re offended that a lowly 0.5 year medical student can demonstrate good test- taking skills and application of knowledge, then I don’t really know what to say except “there’s always someone better out there.” I’m not saying I’ve got the knowledge under my belt to best a pharmacist, but there’s a good chance I’ll get there in another decade or so. You chose pharmacy already. Don’t be upset that medical and dental students have the chops to outdo a lot of pharmacy students. It’s not because we’re smarter, it’s because our education and professional standards demand more.

Btw: Our medical school class has a PharmD and former third year pharmacy student. They’re excellent students.

TL;DR- chill. No one’s saying pharmacy isn’t hard to get through or a respectable profession.
I think youre confusing my pathological snark with me being upset.

I'm like a shark just darting around.
You waded in here and I sensed blood in the water.

Cheers
 
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