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picking up new languages

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tincan123

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I understand that the best language for doctors who intend to practice in the states is probably Spanish hands down.

I am in a unique and somewhat lucky position of speaking multiple languages. I currently speak English, Japanese, and Korean fluently, but cannot write Kanji(Japanese). I can speak Spanish, but with poor grammar. I used to live in a lantin country, and due to the crowd I went to school with, I basically learned ghetto Spanish. I never had any issues conversing in Spanish but get corrections here and there or sometimes flat out made fun of due to my lack of grammar or accent. I currently have time to learn a language through a University or on my own time and was wondering do you think it is worth picking up another language or should I hone one of the ones I already know? Learning language is a fun hobby and a passion of mine and I would like to make the most out of it. Thank you guys in advance
 

Incursio

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Wow. I think this is the first time I found someone else that spoke the same languages I did and has fun learning languages. Being in a similar position (where I know Spanish, Korean, and English fluently and looking to perfect my Japanese), I would say spend time in the language that you feel you need the most work on, but also the one that will best align with your future goals/current interests.
I was born in a Spanish speaking country, but I was never really good at explaining things in words, but if you need help learning Spanish hit me up.
 
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I understand that the best language for doctors who intend to practice in the states is probably Spanish hands down.

I am in a unique and somewhat lucky position of speaking multiple languages. I currently speak English, Japanese, and Korean fluently, but cannot write Kanji(Japanese). I can speak Spanish, but with poor grammar. I used to live in a lantin country, and due to the crowd I went to school with, I basically learned ghetto Spanish. I never had any issues conversing in Spanish but get corrections here and there or sometimes flat out made fun of due to my lack of grammar or accent. I currently have time to learn a language through a University or on my own time and was wondering do you think it is worth picking up another language or should I hone one of the ones I already know? Learning language is a fun hobby and a passion of mine and I would like to make the most out of it. Thank you guys in advance
I agree that Spanish is most likely to be a language you'd find useful in a medical profession. Since it will not reflect well to speak ghetto Spanish in a professional situation, I feel it would be best to hone that language.

If you can pick up some medical terminology in the others, that might be a good secondary goal.
 
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tincan123

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Wow. I think this is the first time I found someone else that spoke the same languages I did and has fun learning languages. Being in a similar position (where I know Spanish, Korean, and English fluently and looking to perfect my Japanese), I would say spend time in the language that you feel you need the most work on, but also the one that will best align with your future goals/current interests.
I was born in a Spanish speaking country, but I was never really good at explaining things in words, but if you need help learning Spanish hit me up.

That is actually so cool! I haven't really met anyone who speaks the same languages either haha I have no clue where I really want to work so I am not sure where my goals lie. I would always rather learn a new language since that is more exciting.... Thank you for the offer I will definitely message you if I have any Spanish questions!

I agree that Spanish is most likely to be a language you'd find useful in a medical profession. Since it will not reflect well to speak ghetto Spanish in a professional situation, I feel it would be best to hone that language.

If you can pick up some medical terminology in the others, that might be a good secondary goal.


Even though I can communicate through Spanish you don't think that's enough? And do you think having poor diction and grammar hinders me that much as a second language?
 
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Even though I can communicate through Spanish you don't think that's enough? And do you think having poor diction and grammar hinders me that much as a second language?
A gringo accent isn't an issue. An occasional verb error isn't either, so long as the sentence isn't open to misinterpretation. But standard vocabulary and lay terms, rather than street slang, should be used in a professional setting.
 
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kitkatkike

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So glad I found this post! My language skills aren't that impressive as yours, but I'm intermediate in Spanish, and am currently picking up Korean for the fun of it. I've been told so many times that learning Korean is pointless, but I can't stop now!
 
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Mongoosie

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A Spanish major is probably overkill, but maybe take a few classes so that you can develop a more "professional" way of speaking with people (at least that's what I might do).

P.S. - Do you recommend taking on Japanese in college? I'm caught between it and Chinese.
 

Lucca

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One way to help is to start reading Spanish media alongside or as an alternative to how you usually get news. Like in English, Spanish journalists write more formally (but not academically) than casually and that might help you pick up new words, terms, and grammar.

Also I wish I knew as many languages as you!
 

Incursio

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A Spanish major is probably overkill, but maybe take a few classes so that you can develop a more "professional" way of speaking with people (at least that's what I might do).

P.S. - Do you recommend taking on Japanese in college? I'm caught between it and Chinese.

I was actually in a similar situation. My reasoning was that Chinese would be more "useful" because more people spoke it and the implications it would have if I ever decided to also learn acupuncture in Asia (weird idea hahaha). But, I ended up going for Japanese cause thats what I thought would be more fun and man I am glad I picked it. Planning to take the highest level for JLPT this December after 4 years of learning :)
 
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