Please help with a question re: CVs?

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by scienceisbeauty, May 16, 2008.

  1. scienceisbeauty

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    Good or stupid to list a required lab course on one's CV as part of research experience?
     
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  2. KillerDiller

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    I would only list it if you actually completed an original study.
     
  3. scienceisbeauty

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    Nah didn't do any such thing - - wrote a research proposal that proposed an original study, got training in that aspect ...we were marked for that, but it was just a course. Some of my fellow students are putting it down...I just didn't think it was necessary...and seemed somewhat deceptive
     
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  4. paramour

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    I would not list it as research experience. HOWEVER, there are sometimes recommendations to list pertinent grad school coursework on your CV in order to reflect your training, etc. As you are not yet in grad school, it might still be acceptable to include your psych (particularly advanced/research) courses in a similar manner on your CV.
     
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  5. scienceisbeauty

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    Yeah, the labratory course was an advanced labratory course - but it wasn't a graduate course. I dunno. I think it's strange to put on the CV. But it was an advanced research lab course so some of my friends feel justified in writing it on their CV. I dunno. I can't think of any particular skills I gained that went above any of my other courses.
     
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  6. shock-me-sane

    shock-me-sane RN, PhD to come
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    I put mine on my CV. Mainly because it was a ton of work and I ended up doing extra work with the prof following the course and did a poster presentation at a conference on the topic. It wasn't MY original idea, but I ended up turning it into something that was mine.

    So I guess it depends on the situation. I didn't get anyone questioning it on my interviews.

    also my advanced lab wasn't required per se, it was an option between that course or a seminar course to complete the degree
     
  7. scienceisbeauty

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    That makes sense you'd write it down. Because you presented it for something other than the course.
    As for me, that course, everyone in that course - all we did was present it for each other.
    We had to chose one lab and one seminar to graduate. So when my friends put it down on their CV it's like saying oh look, I took a course that allowed me to graduate. Actually, look I'm proving that I graduated because here's a course I needed to take.

    It seems deceptive. Not in your case though. In your case it seems completely legit. You went above what the course mandated you. My friends didn't. I don't know. It irks me.
     
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  8. paramour

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    Yes, I realize that it was not a graduate course--as you are not in grad school yet (as previously mentioned), so it's highly unlikely (albeit not impossible) that you have taken such coursework. The point being that you tailor your CV to the needs of the submission. If you are applying to graduate school, then you are obviously going to highlight pre-grad school (i.e., undergrad) experience which is obviously going to include your pre-grad/UG coursework. This information IS listed in your transcripts which are also submitted, so it may be looked at anyway, but then again, it also quickly highlights relevant PSYC related courses that indicate at least your exposure to the basics of research (which some students are not aware of) and possibly other relevant areas/courses that would be helpful in your stint as a future grad student. Of course, reporting UG courses once you're in grad school is likely not a good idea!

    It's all about how you sell yourself. If you're lacking in some area, particularly research, then you may wish to include a short section of your psyc courses and what was covered/what you learned so profs reviewing your application are aware that you do have at least a basic research foundation and that you have been involved in *research-like* activity. (Furthermore, it informs them that you have some understanding of what is expected of you.) Presenting it in a "coursework" or similar section with a sentence or two indicating the course objectives that result in knowledge of the research process and writing a potential research proposal (when many students are not aware of what this actually entails) does not misrepresent your experience. Your method of presentation is what could be construed as misrepresentative and not justified.

    As an applicant, you're likely not going to have much information to relay in a CV, so make the best of it by highlighting what training & experience you do have to make yourself stand out. Yeah, umpteen other applicants probably have a similar if not identical research lab course, but others may not or they may not present themselves as well on paper. My resume is quite detailed & very lengthy due to being a somewhat nontraditional student. My academic CV (that I submitted during the application process) was initially sort of lackadaisical. I received compliments on my resume and my "work experience," some of which I could easily justify as being helpful and relevant to graduate work--BUT, I strongly suspect that my lackluster CV worked against me (among other things) because I personally did not believe that I had a wealth of knowledge/experience to enter on such a document.

    My program requires that we update and submit our CV at the end of each year for review during the annual faculty student evaluations. I submitted an updated version of what I had previously submitted as an applicant (which does not include information that I personally consider CV-worthy). During the pre-submission phase (where it is reviewed by the advisor prior to the annual evaluation), it was recommended that I make a few minor organizational changes to the way I presented my information. Everything was still there that was there previously. These were not huge revisions but I immediately noticed a difference in my overall presentation (of the CV) afterwards. I was impressed with my CV (for once) with something that was oh, so simple to do. The revisions better highlighted what I *do* have and that I actually *do* have more than what is seen at a quick glance/first thought. It no longer screamed an obvious lack thereof in certain areas. I admit that I thought some of the suggestions were a bit odd (and I still think that of a few) but it apparently made quite the difference to some people.

    Remember, you may know what you have to offer and what you have accomplished but an admissions committee does not. They can gather this information from various sources in your application packet and make some inferences, but a CV can give them an overview (and simultaneously provide more detailed information as needed) of your life in academe in one document, making sure that they recognize and understand what you do possess. I'm not talking about padding your CV--simply better organization and presentation of those things that do count and that acknowledge your accomplishments, whatever they might be and whichever area they might be in.
     
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  9. scienceisbeauty

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    I see your point...it's also though that I feel like I learned next to nothing in that course. You know...it didn't seem to teach me more about writing and research than did the average Psychology course. We didn't do extensive SPSS analysis. We didn't read a ton of primary research articles on the topic. I don't know...
     
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  10. Ollie123

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    In certain circumstances its fine (i.e. shock-me-sane's example above...if you presented at a conference than I'd definitely mention it).

    If you can't actually say anything other than "Learned about study design" "analyzed a fake data set for homework assignments", etc. I think it would actually diminish an application if anything since it would make it look like you were trying to pad it, and didn't have enough real experience to include. If it involves you working on an actual project (e.g. archival analysis of a faculty member's data that you guys may do something with afterwards) than I see that more as classroom-guided research experience, and I think its acceptable.
     
  11. scienceisbeauty

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    Yaaaaaaaaaaa I think that's it exactly! I wasn't going to list it on my CV, but I was asking for my friends' sakes.
    I keep telling them it's rather strange to list, but they have only have 1 year of research experience or less so they feel like listing. Maybe I don't feel the need as much because I have about 2.5 - 3 yrs.

    But all of your points have been awesome. I'm going to reiterate them to my friends.
     
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