Prerequisite confusion

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flyon_littlewing9587

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I just want to clarify something as I am a little confused at the moment. I know the physics prerequisites for most schools is 2 semesters or 3 quarters. My issue is my first school was quarter system so I took the first two that way but didn’t take the third (long story). However the school I’m planning on taking the last physics at is semester, but has a 2 part intro series and then a 3 part general physics series and I’m not sure which one to take. I’ll attach the descriptions of the classes [here](https://www.saddleback.edu/mse/physics-courses). Am I supposed to take 2B or 4C?

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I just want to clarify something as I am a little confused at the moment. I know the physics prerequisites for most schools is 2 semesters or 3 quarters. My issue is my first school was quarter system so I took the first two that way but didn’t take the third (long story). However the school I’m planning on taking the last physics at is semester, but has a 2 part intro series and then a 3 part general physics series and I’m not sure which one to take. I’ll attach the descriptions of the classes [here](https://www.saddleback.edu/mse/physics-courses). Am I supposed to take 2B or 4C?
What did the physics department say when it comes to crediting you for your past courses?
 
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What did the physics department say when it comes to crediting you for your past courses?
This^^^. Since you already have 2 quarters, the odds are extremely high you will be fine no matter what you take. If you received any credit at all for what you did previously, you probably received credit for the first part of the 2 part class and the first part or two of the 3 part class, so just take what you need to finish out the year.

If not, then you will have to take a full year of either course at your new school, since retaking the first part of something you already took, but did not receive credit for, is not going to satisfy the requirement. In other words, taking the first semester of physics twice does not satisfy a requirement to take a year of physics.
 
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This^^^. Since you already have 2 quarters, the odds are extremely high you will be fine no matter what you take. If you received any credit at all for what you did previously, you probably received credit for the first part of the 2 part class and the first part or two of the 3 part class, so just take what you need to finish out the year.

If not, then you will have to take a full year of either course at your new school, since retaking the first part of something you already took, but did not receive credit for, is not going to satisfy the requirement. In other words, taking the first semester of physics twice does not satisfy a requirement to take a year of physics.
I’ll call Monday to check ! But here are the descriptions of the first two quarter classes I took:
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This^^^. Since you already have 2 quarters, the odds are extremely high you will be fine no matter what you take. If you received any credit at all for what you did previously, you probably received credit for the first part of the 2 part class and the first part or two of the 3 part class, so just take what you need to finish out the year.

If not, then you will have to take a full year of either course at your new school, since retaking the first part of something you already took, but did not receive credit for, is not going to satisfy the requirement. In other words, taking the first semester of physics twice does not satisfy a requirement to take a year of physics.
And I passed both classes so I should have received credit
 
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Your physics department and registrar have the answers you are looking for. Their decision counts.
If I am able to take either class, do they both look to satisfy the premed prerequisites. I only ask because I’m not sure my JC has a premed advisor that can help answer this.
 
If I am able to take either class, do they both look to satisfy the premed prerequisites. I only ask because I’m not sure my JC has a premed advisor that can help answer this.
I can't answer for all programs. If a school wants a certain number of course hours, you will probably be fine as long as the math on your course hours is correct from the registrar. If a program identifies content that fulfills the requirement, they will look at the syllabus or course description, usually housed by the physics department. Your undergrad academic advisor or transfer advisor should be able to help you, but that is why I advised you. There is no one size fits all answer.
 
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I can't answer for all programs. If a school wants a certain number of course hours, you will probably be fine as long as the math on your course hours is correct from the registrar. If a program identifies content that fulfills the requirement, they will look at the syllabus or course description, usually housed by the physics department. Your undergrad academic advisor or transfer advisor should be able to help you, but that is why I advised you. There is no one size fits all answer.
Okay I’m check with the advisors at this school!
 
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