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prestigious undergrad?

Discussion in 'Pre-Veterinary' started by lechatton, Mar 27, 2007.

  1. lechatton

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    hi everyone,
    i haven't seen much debate on this topic recently, and i would be very interested to see what people think.
    does anyone wonder what it would have been like had they gone to another school for their undergrad in terms of applying to vet school?
    i say this because i went to the most prestigious school that i got accepted to out of high school. i loved my undergrad experience: it was everything i hoped for, and i was extremely challenged. however, in going to a prestigious school, i wonder if my gpa is unfairly low compared to other applicants.
    i say this because i am currently taking org 2 at my state school (i never took it in undergrad) and find it to be so much EASIER. yes, it is org, so it is difficult, but it is by no means the challenge that my classes were at my undergrad college. it is night and day.
    so all i hear on these boards are discussions of gpa, and all i think is that comparing gpa's between schools is a bit like comparing apples and oranges.
    do vet schools see this?
    and before the accusations fly, i am not trying to offend anyone at any type of school. i am relaying my own experience.
    thanks.
     
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  3. kate_g

    kate_g Senior Member

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    Heh. The reputation of quite a number of "prestigious" undergrad schools is quite the opposite - that is, rampant grade inflation and therefore an unfairly high GPA compared to other applicants. (NOTE: Not an insinuation against you personally!)

    Yet again I think the notion of "prestige" is off the mark here. What you're really wondering about is whether the adcom can or will take into account the *difficulty* of your undergrad program. This is hard. At a lot of colleges, particularly the medium-to-big ones, difficulty is what you make it because there are a dozen levels at which courses are offered. I could have graduated with the same degree having taken easier versions of a lot of classes, but for my own benefit I took the hard ones. And there are thousands of colleges in the country, so they can't possibly know all the permutations.

    Some schools do claim to put some weight on the difficulty of your undergraduate program, but then you're stuck wondering how they decided which schools and which majors are the difficult ones. Is Psychology at MIT harder than Engineering at Podunk State? Did they, maybe, just assume prestige means difficulty...?
     
  4. twosoakers

    twosoakers Addict & Western U '11

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    when i was discussing my admissions committee nightmares at the-school-i-shall-not-mention with another student who was trying to get in (and who after three tries had gotten in), we turned to our other lab partner who said, 'my gpa was 2.6. i went to yale.'

    he's brilliant, regardless.

    another student at this school told me she went to the 'wrong' pa school, and thus came to this school from out-of-state, that penn only takes most of its in-state students from certain programs (much fewer from penn state, where she went)

    i was told i could never do graduate school at yale because i came from an undergraduate state school.

    believe-you-me, your undergraduate institution matters.
     
  5. EmersonLove

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    Yeah, I went to a similar such undergrad institution and also took my organic chem classes at a state school in order to raise my sci gpa. I really loved my undergrad experience, it was very challenging and gave me a wonderful education, but it has cost me SOOOO much in terms of competitiveness. I had to go to grad school at the state university in order to stand a chance at admissions.
     
  6. lechatton

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    i'm glad to hear i'm not the only one facing this dilemna.

    and to respond, yes, for the most part, i am not afraid to equate prestige with difficulty. obviously there is a lot of gray, but there is a reason that some schools are deemed prestigious. in my undergrad classes, a majority of my peers were valedictorians, salutorians, etc. when this is your competition, the exams the profs throw at you typically are not easy because they can't give everyone an A.

    taking org 2 at my state school, i have yet to get below an A on anything. the types of questions and the grading are different. and bonus points! i haven't had bonus points since high school! (not to say every class at this school has bonus points).

    not that i'm complaining. sure, i am ecstatic that i am doing well in org 2. however, i wonder if this is some secret that i was never told when i applied to undergrad; namely, that if your goal is grad school then your undergrad doesn't matter as long as you maintain a great gpa.

    it's hard to say. i don't know what i would have done if i were to redo my undergrad application process. it's hard being in debt with a lower gpa and feeling like my chances at vet school are less than if i had gone to another school.

    i can't really be bitter until after i apply for vet schools, but i also can't help but think these things as i read through these threads.
     
  7. silverelf

    silverelf Tufts Class of 2011

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    all i can say is DO NOT APPLY TO COLORADO STATE!!!!!

    i too had the same dilemma and was rejected from CSU. In my post-mortem I was informed that they do not take the difficulty of your undergrad institution into account because "there are some many kids that apply here from liberal arts schools that aren't ranked". Which is fine and dandy, I guess, but it certainly screwed over my chances at that school. I found, however, that most other institutions either directly consider your level of difficulty at your undergrad school, or they have a little "bonus system" if you went to a particularly difficult college.
     
  8. wildfocus

    wildfocus DVM/PhD student

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    i have to chuckle a little, b/c at age 16 i WAS told this, but thinking i was so wise, refused to listen... 16 years later i agree that undergrad prestige doesn't really matter as much as grad school, but how to make my younger self see? it seems whatever our goal (high school, undergrad, grad) we are just looking at the next step - trying to get over one hurdle at a time....
     
  9. EmersonLove

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    Amen- my sentiments exactly. Some of these people post that they had a 4.0, 3.95 gpa. NO ONE at my school in my program (biology) had above a 3.6. Average graduating gpa for those in biology was around a 3.0. And 95% of students at my school where in top 10% of their highschool class... so these aren't idiots we're talking about.



    When people ask me how I liked it b/c they, or their kids are considering it, I always tell them… if you want into a grad program go somewhere else. It’s a great education but is it worth it?
     
  10. luckyduck517

    luckyduck517 SGU SVM 2012

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    Believe me, you're not the only one who feels this way! I've been a reader on this board for a while, and while I feel that I'm getting an excellent education at my very small, very very difficult undergrad school, I wonder if going to the most challenging college I was accepted to means that now it will take me a few extra years to be accepted to vet school. Was it worth it? Much as I love my college, if it really does take me a few extra years, I'm not sure. It would be nice to know if there are schools that seriously consider the rigor of the applicant's academic program!
     
  11. lechatton

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    yayyyyyyy i'm not the only one.

    keep it coming, keep it coming.

    there were quite a few times i contemplated transfering out to another school to improve my gpa, but because i am stubborn and proud, i didn't.

    and i am proud of my undergrad degree, so proud, even just last week i had a job interview for a lab at an ivy league school and they commented how impressed they were with my undergrad.

    aren't some vet schools the same?
    :love:
     
  12. ri23

    ri23 OSU CVM Class of 2011

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    I think that going to a harder, more prestigious school does make it harder to get into vet school. I knew for myself when I applied to undergrad that I would be more comfortable wit hthe "big fish in a small pond" phenomenon as I wouldn't be as stressed as competing with others that were valedictorians of their high school classes.

    On a related note - I was always a little bitter about the course rigor that is suggested. My undergrad advisor always recommended the hardest/honors courses and I also chose to pursue a harder major. I think it is sad that challenging yourself in undergrad can end up being a detriment.
     
  13. lechatton

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    on a related note, i always LOATHED the "med school kids" who took bird courses to improve their gpa.
    you know, 'pop music after 1960' and 'children's lit.'
    and guess where it got them.
    med school.
    because they had high gpa's.
    so there i was, trying to not be a med school kid, taking my english elective course on john milton (of paradise lost fame) to challenge myself and content that i, as a biology major, got a b whereas class avereage was b-.
    this will get me into vet school, right?

    :p
     
  14. EmersonLove

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    A friend of mine who graduated from my school a year ahead of me had a 3.1gpa and got accepted to 3 vet schools his first year applying (penn, auburn and florida). But his gre score was in the upper 1300s.
    So, it is possible to get in with a less than impressive gpa.
     
  15. Serendipity4

    Serendipity4 U of MN Class of 2011

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    I honestly don't know here, but my guess is that adcom's do take SOME note of your undergrad. college. For example, I think if you have an excellent GPA but went to a less challenging undergrad., they probably want to see whether you attempted to challenge yourself at whatever school you went to. That said, if you have a lower GPA (though I'm sure there's a cut-off), most probably give SOME consideration if you've got a prestigious school listed. I come from the opposite, that is, a not quite so prestigious school (Arizona State, to be specific; don't get me wrong -- I LOVE my school, and I feel you can get a great education if you have the initiative, but something about being rated the #1 party school by PlayBoy that probably takes it down a couple notches :oops: . I have what most consider a great GPA and good GRE scores (1410), plus research experience. That said, I got rejected from 3 schools and accepted at 1. Now I'm not saying it's DEFINITELY because of the school I went to, but I can't help but think some of the schools looked at me and said "Yeah she has a 4.0, but she went to ASU...:cool: "
     
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  17. wildfocus

    wildfocus DVM/PhD student

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    but to play devil's advocate... it isn't gpa alone that gets you into vet school. i was surprised at how "holistic" both davis and colorado were. get some great experience under your belt, and do something that makes you stand out, while at the same time illustrates your passions and interests. ultimately, you want to look different somehow than the other 1200 applicants to the program. :)

    serendip - wasn't meant as a reply to you... i posted just after you :)
     
  18. cyrille104

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    Prestige matters, period. To repeat myself, Penn flat out told me that it matters. When I went to my Penn interview, everyone around me was from one of the top schools in the country. Tufts also implied that it matters, and Cornell's admissions rubrick says they give 5% for the "difficulty" of your academic program. Even with grade inflation, it's much harder when competing against people who got As in high school AP classes than people who got Bs in regular college prep classes. And the schools know that, especially Penn, Tufts, and Cornell, whose undergraduate programs To back this up, my GRE was a 1460 and my essays were well-written, reflective of the fact that I'm at a difficult school where a 3.5 is pretty good. My GPA was a 3.5, and I got into 3 out of the 4 schools I applied to. The exception was CSU, as someone already mentioned - don't waste your time and money with CSU (out-of-state), regardless of your undergraduate institution, unless your GPA is amazing or you have extensive extensive veterinary or "life" experience. Moral of the story: I honestly think I would have had a much harder time if I went to a state school.
     
  19. EmersonLove

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    yeah, but what about those whose undergrad was prestigious, and very difficult, but is not really well know outside of the state b/c its a small liberal arts college. Thats where you get screwed.
     
  20. wildfocus

    wildfocus DVM/PhD student

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    i also wonder if this is an east versus west coast thing?? honestly, things are a little different out here. i lived/worked/schooled on the east coast for ~3 years and where you went/who you knew really seemed to matter. not so much out here (but, of course, i am a tad biased).
     
  21. julieDVM

    julieDVM Member

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    I went to a lowly state school, got a 3.9 overall GPA, and got into every school i applied to.

    Your undergrad school is completely irrelevant. Its how you do that counts.
     
  22. laurafinn

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    At one point, my college web site stated that 70% of its students who got a GPA of 3.0 or above got admitted to med school. Apparently, nationwide, only 40% of students with 3.0+ get admitted to med school. I suspect the same is true for other well-regarded liberal arts schools, and for vet school as well as med school.

    (Don't know from personal experience, though, since I took an unorthodox route.)
     
  23. Quaggi

    Quaggi Member

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    Like a lot of you I chose to go to the hardest undergrad I could find, because it was prestigious, and there were a few times I wished that I could have just gone somewhere easy and floated through. But you know what? In the end, now that I'm in vet school, I wouldn't trade my undergrad experience for anything! Being at a tough undergrad institution taught me how to study for classes that throw a ridiculous amount of facts at you and expect you to remember them (exactly like vet school!) and also taught me how to think. Because of that, I haven't had a hard time at all doing well in vet school, while a lot of my classmates who went to "easier" undergrad schools are doing pretty poorly. So, don't regret your decision to go to a hard undergrad because it will pay off later :)
     
  24. Sassygirl

    Sassygirl OSU CVM Class of 2011

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    Ok. I've kept my mouth shut up til now but now I have to say something. I rather resent the phrase "lowly state school" I currently attend a state school and consider it a quality institution. What's more; many of the vet schools are affiliated with "lowly state schools"...
     
  25. ri23

    ri23 OSU CVM Class of 2011

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    I don't think anyone was saying that at all. What people are saying is that if you go to an ivy league/difficult school you are competing against people that are more likely to get high grades, therefore, your GPA may not be as high. People are saying that going to a state school, which I do go to and I think is an excellent school, makes it easier to get a high GPA. I don't think this is necessarily true if you take challenging course work, but I do agree that it would have been harder to get a high GPA at an ivy league school.
     
  26. runnerDC

    runnerDC Tufts - class of 2011

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    Your pedigree (defined here as "the perceived quality/reputation/prestige of your undergrad school") will matter more to some vet schools than to others. Just as your pedigree will matter more to some people/jobs/etc later on in life than it will to others.

    Perhaps Penn, Tufts, and Cornell do put greater weight on pedigree than other schools. I only say this because Penn, Tufts, and Cornell ALSO all asked at some point during the app period whether or not any family members are staff, faculty, or alumni of their schools. They consider the legacy factor, whereas other places never ask about that. Penn and Cornell are "ivy league", and I do think that has something to do with the type and background of overall student they try to attract to their schools. Tufts as a vet school is much newer--having only opened up in the early-80s--but sees Penn and Cornell as direct competitors (these are all private universities in the NE), and, hence--in my opinion--may model *some* of their admissions policies so that they can attract and compete for some of the same students. All conjecture on my part.

    But regardless of what the possible admissions policies may or may not be and what they may or may not judge as more or less prestigious, the bottom line for you is to attend the best fit (personally, academically, financially, etc) undergrad school for you, as you determine. And while you're there, challenge yourself as much as you can; just as you would with anything in your life that really matters to you.
     
  27. wivet2011

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    I completely agree. I also attend a state school and was accepted at 3 of the 4 schools I applied to and was waitlisted at the other. IMO, your undergrad experience is what you make of it. And I don't think that prestiges schools teach you how to study either, that is something that you learn on your own if you want to do well, regardless of what school you are attending.
     
  28. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane

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    i think ya'll are silly. i too had a 3.5 and 1460 GRE, not extensive "life" experience, and was waitlisted at CSU. that's not an acceptance, but Ms. Stewart said she was confident i'd be offered a spot this semester; granted, i'm declining, but CSU is not a waste of money, even if you're out of state!

    school is what you make it. you take a john milton lit class for the hell of it, yeah, you're gonna have a more difficult time getting into professional school if that elective drastically brings down your GPA. i went to a private school, and despite the loans, i loved it. so my GPA wasn't a 3.9, but i doubt it would have been at Penn State, either. yes, i was asked about my undergrad school at my Penn interview, but i don't think that was a big role in my acceptances. i really don't think undergrad is a make or break decision here. go where you want to go.

    i'm also inclined to think that maybe the med school students are the smart ones.
     
  29. ratbandit

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    One of my prof's was speaking with someone at Penn (he graduated from there and also works there and at my school) and said that Penn does rank the undergraduate schools for in state applicants from 1 to 4 (don't know if 1 is better than 4 or vice versa). I think he was concerned that students here weren't being counted "equally" to those of larger universities and such. Turns out my little school was highly ranked - I'm assuming for the quality of the animal science department and not for the overal academic prestige factor. This professor also talks to himself and wears sweat pants w/ collared shirts and ties so I don't know how much weight I would put on this statement. :)
     
  30. cyrille104

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    You missed the point. I'm arguing that a 3.5 at a prestigious school is worth more than a 3.5 at a less prestigious school.
     
  31. cyrille104

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    Didn't you take a year off though? CSU loves that sort of "life experience" stuff (not that it's not important).

    My point is that some schools DO take it into consideration. CSU doesn't, but Tufts, Penn, and Cornell definitely do. So I was saying that if you're counting on CSU to recognize your school, don't bother. If you're counting on them to recognize your spiritual journey or your non-trad status, then it's worth applying.
     
  32. KittenKiller

    KittenKiller chop suey

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    I went to one of the main targets of these criticisms, Harvard - and there definitely was grade inflation, but I do have a few comments.

    First, I went intending to study science and and got C's in orgo in math. I abruptly switched majors and discovered that suddenly I could get A's in what were my worst subjects! English and history. Then I realized maybe like 10% of every english class got less than an A-. So the real culprit of grade inflation were humanities teachers, and the whole grade inflation scandal reflected pretty unfairly upon some very bright science majors, many of whom were getting B's and C's despite working pretty damn hard. And when I went to get my prevet reqs postbac, the courses I repeated were much easier than the equivalent Harvard undergrad courses.

    But it cuts both ways. I dont think that people who go to prestigious schools have any place complaining that they are treated unfairly, for the most part. In 99% of cases, going to a prestigious school helps tremendously, even giving an unfair advantage sometimes. I know plenty of people who got straight A's at state schools and couldnt even get their resumes looked at by companies they wanted to work for, whereas some of the biggest slackers I knew at Harvard hardly batted an eyelash to get cushy jobs with 6 figure salaries straight out of college.

    Anyway, I think some people are oversimplifying things in this thread a bit. To some schools, prestige matters more. Maybe if your school is prestigious but vet school X doesnt know much about its curriculum or reputation, school X wont take that prestige into account so much. Personally my biggest disappointment in the whole application process was how impersonal and formulaic most of the applications were. There are plenty of people who can pull off 4.0's and still wouldnt make good vets, and there are as many brilliant vet techs Ive met who would make great vets but just cant do well in orgo and are written off.
     
  33. cyrille104

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    Northwestern's not Harvard, but it's the same way here. The science curves are extremely hard because you are competing against the top students in the nation - whereas the humanities generally aren't curved. I'm just glad I'm in my last quarter here - it's so f'ing hard.
     
  34. Angelo84

    Angelo84 Tufts Class of 2011

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    I know that some schools take into account the prestige of your school. I go to UConn and feel that I have had a very good education. I have taken challenging courses and done well in them. I think one thing that schools might care about more than what school your at is how heavy a course load you are taking. If you are taking 12 credits (ie are just barely a full time student) and getting A's that is good but taking 20 credits and getting A's shows that you are willing to work hard and can handle the course load in vet school. I do not mean any offense to people that are balancing classes and work but feel that showing you can handle a heavy course load in undergrad is important. Go wherever you want, do well, and have fun.
     
  35. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane

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    i did take a year off, and did nothing grandiose with it. i wasn't flipping burgers, but i wasn't saving lives. and thanks for your "not that there's anything wrong with that!" seinfeld comment, lol.

    *sigh* i still think ya'll are silly. and i'm sure you didn't mean this cyrille, but if anyone is "counting" on a school to recognize their undergrad institution, their application most likely has enough flaws other than their relatively low GPA that will hold them back in the admissions cycle.
     
  36. ShelterGirl

    ShelterGirl UC Davis SVM 2012

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    (Chuckling) Yeah, Michigan was like that too - particularly the engineering school.
     
  37. kate_g

    kate_g Senior Member

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    That's kinda funny, because at my Penn interview, most of the people at my table (including at least one of the current students) went to either Penn State or University of Delaware.
     
  38. cyrille104

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    Hm, well I can assure that I'm not lying, but Herpen did tell me it makes a difference. On the other hand, not EVERYONE went to a "top" school, that would be pretty unfair.
     
  39. kate_g

    kate_g Senior Member

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    Sorry, I wasn't putting any claim forward one way or the other. I just snickered when I read "I went to a prestigious undergrad and I have an unfairly low GPA" given that many people outside the Ivy League would *assume* just the opposite.

    As a more general comment, I suppose my whole take on this is that acting all entitled will, by and large, not make you any friends. Sure, you're at a prestigious school now and it's all good to talk amongst yourselves about how much better you are (which may well be true, since a lot of prestigious schools *do* have rigorous programs). And probably at the private vet schools that put some emphasis on prestige, that same kind of attitude will not hurt you, because they feel the same way. BUT... *Most* undergrad schools in the country are (by definition!) not prestigious. Most veterinary schools are associated with state universities. Veterinary medicine 20 years ago was generally not the kind of profession that people from prestigious backgrounds went into. So your adcom is going to be made up of a lot of people who went to non-prestigious undergrad institutions and are currently employed by a state university, and might well be insulted if you insinuate that they should just let you in with a lower GPA because you went to a better university than they did. See my point?

    Vent all you want on here, that's what internet forums are for. Just be careful what you actually say in your personal statement and interview...
     
  40. cyrille104

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    100% agree. IF the admissions committee decides that you deserve some sort of recognition for your institution, it will speak for itself. DO NOT mention it anywhere else!
     
  41. 4theanimals

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    Okay, so this is a partial detour from the subject, but this got me thinking. Okay, so we begin with what effect does going to a well known school have. I won't even argue that either way, but why should it stop there. The other things I quickly think of that place people on different playing fields (please understand this is no personal assault on anyone I just imagined how complicated this could all get):
    * What if I have a degree in English and you have one in Biology? Does that automatically mean I should be deducted points even if I have aced all the prereqs?
    * What is someone has a minor or double major? Should they automatically get bonus points?
    * What if my school is on the semester system and yours is on the quarter? I've heard many argue that a semester system is "easier". So if you attend a school that is on the quarter system should you get a bonus?
    * Some schools grade using a plus/minus system and others use straight letter grades. Does that mean one should be punished?
    * What if your school has a strong pre-vet or pre-med program and therefor sciences are very competitive. While someone else goes to a school where there are fewer "competitors" do they get a deduction?
    *Heck I know on my campus some science course you just beat your head against the wall, and then there is the occassional what a joke. Should I ask the admissions committed to disregard the A in the joke class and give me more points for the struggle of a B in that killer Ochem course?
    I guess I'm just saying that yes it is hard to compare apples and oranges but could you imagine if they tried to compare apples to apples. The matrix that would have to be created would be pages long and the application process would last years instead of months.
     
  42. Pennymare

    Pennymare Ohio State Class of 2011

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    Penn's Class of 2010 has 10-12 Penn State students, so I don't think they discriminate against 'state' schools now...they did change Deans, so this may have made a difference.
     
  43. Pennymare

    Pennymare Ohio State Class of 2011

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    Bravo, 4theanimals. These are good questions that (to me) serve to point out the gray areas in this entire debate.
     
  44. JIKJen124

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    There is of course another solution to all of this... Which is to have it both ways. Go to a prestigous university and get good grades. Before you jump down my throat for stating what may be somewhat obvious, let me say I'm speaking from experience here. I went to a very highly respected (and ranked) private university (that happens to have a team in the Final Four), and managed to do very well. Was it fun spending all those Friday and Saturday nights in the library? Not particularly. However, I thrived on the challenge and the knowledge that my success would help open doors later on. If you're really an excellent student, demonstrating it against the best competition can only help. If nothing else, it should make performing at the vet school level that much easier.

    From the non-trad side of me, I always advocate going to the undergrad institution that "feels right" for you, and where you'll get the best, student centered education by professors who are committed to your success. In all likelihood (as would be echoed by others on this forum), life is going to change in ways you can't expect. Consequently, focusing your school choice based solely on grad school plans that may or may not pan out, might not make the most sense.
     
  45. cyrille104

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    * What if I have a degree in English and you have one in Biology? Does that automatically mean I should be deducted points even if I have aced all the prereqs? No, as is made clear in most admissions policies.
    * What is someone has a minor or double major? Should they automatically get bonus points? Yes, there's really no debate here.
    * What if my school is on the semester system and yours is on the quarter? I've heard many argue that a semester system is "easier". So if you attend a school that is on the quarter system should you get a bonus? No, because the educational difference between the semester and quarter systems is not proven.
    * Some schools grade using a plus/minus system and others use straight letter grades. Does that mean one should be punished? No, that would make no sense. It doesn't affect your GPA. Just as you might get a 4.0 for an A-, you'll get a 3.0 for a B+.
    * What if your school has a strong pre-vet or pre-med program and therefor sciences are very competitive. While someone else goes to a school where there are fewer "competitors" do they get a deduction? No, unless the reason that the program is more competitive is because you're at an ivy league school.
    *Heck I know on my campus some science course you just beat your head against the wall, and then there is the occassional what a joke. Should I ask the admissions committed to disregard the A in the joke class and give me more points for the struggle of a B in that killer Ochem course? No, every school has classes that are easier, and everyone has the opportunity to take them. It's easy to tell the difference between Organic Chemistry and Bioethics.

    I don't really see any grey areas here.

    Unlike the difference between the semester system and quarter system, it's been proven that, on average, higher grade students go through more competitive undergraduate institutions. Of course, pretty much everyone on this forum is a high-grade student, considering how many of us got into vet school. I'm just saying there's a reason why a 3.5 at Harvard is worth a 3.7 or 3.8 at a lesser known school.
     
  46. cyrille104

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    Keep in mind that the vast majority of these students were undoubtedly in-state applicants.
     
  47. philomycus

    philomycus The Tree Rat

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    Actually it does effect GPA at some schools. In my B+ grades, I was awarded A 3.3 for those hours, if I got an A-, I earned a 3.7 for those credits, not a 4.0.

    I think it all balances out though. I would not worry about extactly what school you go to (as far as obsessing over it). Do what's right for you, when it's right, the rest will follow. I haven't gotten in anywhere yet, but I wouldn't change the path I've taken.
     
  48. Bill59

    Bill59 Member

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    The only thing that should matter would be if students from more competitive undergraduate programs performed better in veterinary school. And as far as I know, there's no such proof.
     
  49. PdxYOSHI

    PdxYOSHI Oregon State 2011

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    Bottom line is that I highly doubt that anyone on this thread is on the admission committees at any of the vet schools. Who's to say why one person will get accepted at 8 schools while rejected from 2. Just try your hardest and get the best grades. Go to a school you like and worry about the rest later. Oh and correct me if I'm wrong if you are on an admission committee.
     
  50. Emio

    Emio Fudge Bane

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    please. i'm not looking to start a fight, i'm looking to help you down from your self-prescribed pedistool. your blatant statements may be accurate for you, but not necessarily an ultimate truth.

    why should the reason of the competition of the program matter? it's obviously should not be the case that your school has an outrageously competitive biology program yet the kid that got into an ivy league based on legacy gets a 'bonus'? maybe i misread... she asked if the fewer competitor school studnet gets a deduction, and you answered, not unless the competition is due to ivy league status. so those taht *don't* go to ivy league should get deducted?

    and just an aside... i purposely steered clear of our Bioethics course. being a jesuit institution, ethics is taken very seriously, and taught by the biggest hard-ass the university has to offer. hell no, i'm not messing around with that. much more difficult that the org chem class, from what i've heard. diagnosing certain classes amongst colleges as "easier" and thus weighting them less would be impossible. (i guess ultimately on that one i'm agreeing with you.)

    apologies if i got rubbed the wrong way for nothing.
     
  51. Sassygirl

    Sassygirl OSU CVM Class of 2011

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    I'm sure that many of them were but the fact remains that that is roughly 10% of Penn's class...

    Penn State has a killer Animal Science Department. We may not be "prestigious" in your opinion but our faculty is awesome. If our student are not quality applicants, then why did Dean Hendricks make a special effort to bring many of the faculty members on the admissions committee up here to meet our advisors and Pre-Vet Club members last spring?
     
  52. ri23

    ri23 OSU CVM Class of 2011

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    I don't necessarily agree that students will go to the best undergraduate school that they get into. I got into some schools that I'm sure many people would think are "better" than Ohio State, but I wouldn't trade my experiences at my state school for anything in the world. Large state schools have the opportunity to bring in world class faculty and researchers. Ohio State is also continually improving and accepting increasingly higher caliber applicants.

    Also, one of my good friends from high school had a perfect score on her SAT and ACT, was one of our valedictorians and a state ranked athlete. She had her pick of schools to go to (but she was debating between OSU and the school she currently attends) but she didn't want to attend an ivy league institution because of the mentality at those schools.
     

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