anteater85

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A bag of candy contains only nut chewies and marshmallow delights. there are twice as many nut chewies as marshmallow delights. ther nut chewies are either peanut or cashew and there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as there are peanut chwies. if Julie selects on piece of candy at random, what's the probability that she picks a cashew chewy.?
 
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A bag of candy contains only nut chewies and marshmallow delights. there are twice as many nut chewies as marshmallow delights. ther nut chewies are either peanut or cashew and there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as there are peanut chwies. if Julie selects on piece of candy at random, what's the probability that she picks a cashew chewy.?
Fastest way to think about it is:
Because there are twice as many nuts as marshmallows, we know the bag is comprised of 2/3 (66%) nuts and 1/3 (33%) marshmallows. Because there are 1/3 as many cashews as there are peanuts, there will be about 48% peanuts and 16% cashews (this is slightly lower but is easy to approximate as 48/16 is exactly 3 and they add up to 64& which is almost 66%), so now scan your answers for something a little above 16% for your answer
 

joonkimdds

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This math question sounds 10 times harder than anything I saw from actual DAT.
 
Jul 26, 2009
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This math question sounds 10 times harder than anything I saw from actual DAT.
No, judging from my own DAT I think that actually looks about right. Maybe more towards the end of the section but I can definitely see a question like this on the DAT.
 

dentrilla

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A bag of candy contains only nut chewies and marshmallow delights. there are twice as many nut chewies as marshmallow delights. ther nut chewies are either peanut or cashew and there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as there are peanut chwies. if Julie selects on piece of candy at random, what's the probability that she picks a cashew chewy.?
Chances shes going to pick a nut is 2/3 ( ratio is 2:1, nut:marshmallow). Chance that nut which will be picked is a cashew is 1/3.
she needs to hit both chances which means the answer is (2/3)(1/3)= (2/9)
 

Streetwolf

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Chances shes going to pick a nut is 2/3 ( ratio is 2:1, nut:marshmallow). Chance that nut which will be picked is a cashew is 1/3.
she needs to hit both chances which means the answer is (2/3)(1/3)= (2/9)
Chance of a cashew is 1/4.
 
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anteater85

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This math question sounds 10 times harder than anything I saw from actual DAT.
THank you...honestly math is killing me eventhough I got As in my calculus, algebra and trig classes....
I forgot everything :(
 

dentrilla

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anteater85

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hmm.. i dont see it? i hear u're the QR god tho so i'll refrain from being cocky till u reply :):) hahahah

This is a probability question, but before we can plug into the basic probability formula, we need to figure out the number of the various candy types. the easiest way to do this is to pick numbers, starting with our smallest value.we are told that there are two types of candy, nut chewies and mashmallow delights. there are twice as many nut chewies as marshmallos delights. from here, the category of nut chewies is narrowed down even further. it seems the nut cheies can be either peanut or cashew and there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as peanut chewies. cashew seems like the smallest number so far. so let's assign a value to it. if we say that there is 1 cashew chewey, there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as peanut chewies, so there must be 3 peanut chewies. So together, there are 4 nut chewies. we know that there are twice as many nut chewies as mashmallos delights, so there must be only 2 marshmallow delights, for a total of 6 candies altogether. Now that we have our numbers straight we can plug into the probability formula. Since we're trying to find the probability of selecting a cashwe chewy, the number of cashwe chewies is the number of desired outcomes and the total number of pieces of candy is the number of possible outcomes.



so disired outcomes/ possible outcome=1/6:luck:
 

dentrilla

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This is a probability question, but before we can plug into the basic probability formula, we need to figure out the number of the various candy types. the easiest way to do this is to pick numbers, starting with our smallest value.we are told that there are two types of candy, nut chewies and mashmallow delights. there are twice as many nut chewies as marshmallos delights. from here, the category of nut chewies is narrowed down even further. it seems the nut cheies can be either peanut or cashew and there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as peanut chewies. cashew seems like the smallest number so far. so let's assign a value to it. if we say that there is 1 cashew chewey, there are 1/3 as many cashew chewies as peanut chewies, so there must be 3 peanut chewies. So together, there are 4 nut chewies. we know that there are twice as many nut chewies as mashmallos delights, so there must be only 2 marshmallow delights, for a total of 6 candies altogether. Now that we have our numbers straight we can plug into the probability formula. Since we're trying to find the probability of selecting a cashwe chewy, the number of cashwe chewies is the number of desired outcomes and the total number of pieces of candy is the number of possible outcomes.



so disired outcomes/ possible outcome=1/6:luck:
this is wrong. in your example there should be 3 nutchewies total. not four. that way 1 outa those 3 are cashew chewies. yours would be right if the question stated that there were 1/4 as many cashew chewies as peanut.
 
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anteater85

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this is wrong. in your example there should be 3 nutchewies total. not four. that way 1 outa those 3 are cashew chewies. yours would be right if the question stated that there were 1/4 as many cashew chewies as peanut.
This is the answer that Kaplan has :(
 

dentrilla

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This is the answer that Kaplan has :(
i really dont think this is right...

there are 1/3 as many cashew as peanut(is this exactly how the question is worded?) which means that its 33% cashew and 66% peanut. 1/3 are cashews, 2/3 and peanuts.

so this means theres 3 total nuts, which would mean 1.5 marshmellows..

this gives 1/4.5 as the answer (same as what i originally had 2/9) maybe i'm completely missing something tho... but i did get a A+ in statistics(took it a year ago)
 

Valigator00

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i really dont think this is right...

there are 1/3 as many cashew as peanut(is this exactly how the question is worded?) which means that its 33% cashew and 66% peanut. 1/3 are cashews, 2/3 and peanuts.

so this means theres 3 total nuts, which would mean 1.5 marshmellows..

this gives 1/4.5 as the answer (same as what i originally had 2/9) maybe i'm completely missing something tho... but i did get a A+ in statistics(took it a year ago)
im pretty certain that it is 2/9 as well. This is more of a fraction problem than a probability :idea:
 

Streetwolf

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i really dont think this is right...

there are 1/3 as many cashew as peanut(is this exactly how the question is worded?) which means that its 33% cashew and 66% peanut. 1/3 are cashews, 2/3 and peanuts.

so this means theres 3 total nuts, which would mean 1.5 marshmellows..

this gives 1/4.5 as the answer (same as what i originally had 2/9) maybe i'm completely missing something tho... but i did get a A+ in statistics(took it a year ago)
If there are 1/3 as many cashews as peanuts then there are 25% cashews and 75% peanuts.

Remember C = 1/3 P so we have 3C = P. There are a total of 4 objects (or a multiple of 4). For every 1 cashew there are 3 peanuts, 4 objects total, and 1 out of the 4 objects is a cashew.

===

You would be correct if the problem said 1/3 of the nut chewies are cashews.
 

Valigator00

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If there are 1/3 as many cashews as peanuts then there are 25% cashews and 75% peanuts.

Remember C = 1/3 P so we have 3C = P. There are a total of 4 objects (or a multiple of 4). For every 1 cashew there are 3 peanuts, 4 objects total, and 1 out of the 4 objects is a cashew.

===

You would be correct if the problem said 1/3 of the nut chewies are cashews.
Ohh snapp!! You are right. sry bout earlier post
 

dentrilla

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if you have 9 disks, and I tell you i have 1/3 as many disks as you, how many disks do i have?

9*(1/3) = 3....


3/9 = 1/3 = 33%... ??
 

Streetwolf

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if you have 9 disks, and I tell you i have 1/3 as many disks as you, how many disks do i have?

9*(1/3) = 3....


3/9 = 1/3 = 33%... ??
But of ALL the disks, what percentage do you have?

We aren't comparing cashews to peanuts to get the 1/4... we're comparing cashews to total nut chewies. Read the question again to see what I'm talking about.
 

dentrilla

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But of ALL the disks, what percentage do you have?

We aren't comparing cashews to peanuts to get the 1/4... we're comparing cashews to total nut chewies. Read the question again to see what I'm talking about.
yah i see what you mean. i still think the question is bad,

thanks for the help tho