SugarNaCl

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I'm even way ahead of jumping the gun here considering I'm not even D-1 yet but does anyone know how competitive getting into prosthodontics is? Everyone talks about oral surgery or orthodontics but no one seems to ever mention becominig a prosthodontist and I am fascinated by the work that I have seen at the cancer hospital I work at. I think this is a more intensive route and maybe not practical given my age (soon to be 27) and my finacial/family goals/future. Anyone have any information on the field? It's difficult to find much on it...such as if they require an MD degree as well (in which case there is no way I would want to spend an additional 6 yrs after dental school training.) If anyone has any info, can you make me informed ;) Thanks!
 

Drill2Fill

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Might get some responses if you post this in the Dental forum.
 
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MD degree is only for OMFS.

it is probably less competitive than OMFS and Ortho, about as competitive as pedo & endo, and more competitive than perio.

just a guess tho...
 

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I'm even way ahead of jumping the gun here considering I'm not even D-1 yet but does anyone know how competitive getting into prosthodontics is? Everyone talks about oral surgery or orthodontics but no one seems to ever mention becominig a prosthodontist and I am fascinated by the work that I have seen at the cancer hospital I work at. I think this is a more intensive route and maybe not practical given my age (soon to be 27) and my finacial/family goals/future. Anyone have any information on the field? It's difficult to find much on it...such as if they require an MD degree as well (in which case there is no way I would want to spend an additional 6 yrs after dental school training.) If anyone has any info, can you make me informed ;) Thanks!

Here is the answer to your curiousity....

To work with oral cancer patients in the field of dentistry requires you to become a maxillofacial prosthodontist ( 3 year residency in prosthodontics and one year maxillofacial prosthodontics fellowship). You will manage these patients by restoring facial defects and/or oral defects by prosthetic intervention such as implants placement/restoration intra and extraorally. It is a very rewarding field because you can make a HUGE impact on patient's life such as helping them talk or look appropriatetly in public. See this link for what I do.

http://abqtrib.com/news/2007/feb/15/erik-siemers-doctor-enjoys-healthy-doses-laughter/

The term physician on Mayo Web is most likely written by some non-dental people. Regarding the competiveness of getting into pros, I say that it is not nearly competitive as in endo, OS or ortho. However, it does require above average board scores and excellent dexterity. It is NOT open admission as some ego ladden OS people lead you to believe. Getting into maxillofacial fellowship is extremely competitive as there are about 10 medical centers that accept only 1-2 a year. DP
 

Drill2Fill

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Here is the answer to your curiousity....

To work with oral cancer patients in the field of dentistry requires you to become a maxillofacial prosthodontist ( 3 year residency in prosthodontics and one year maxillofacial prosthodontics fellowship). You will manage these patients by restoring facial defects and/or oral defects by prosthetic intervention such as implants placement/restoration intra and extraorally. It is a very rewarding field because you can make a HUGE impact on patient's life such as helping them talk or look appropriatetly in public. See this link for what I do.

http://abqtrib.com/news/2007/feb/15/erik-siemers-doctor-enjoys-healthy-doses-laughter/

The term physician on Mayo Web is most likely written by some non-dental people. Regarding the competiveness of getting into pros, I say that it is not nearly competitive as in endo, OS or ortho. However, it does require above average board scores and excellent dexterity. It is NOT open admission as some ego ladden OS people lead you to believe. Getting into maxillofacial fellowship is extremely competitive as there are about 10 medical centers that accept only 1-2 a year. DP

Nice article, but it really didn't explain what you do.
 

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I'm even way ahead of jumping the gun here considering I'm not even D-1 yet but does anyone know how competitive getting into prosthodontics is? Everyone talks about oral surgery or orthodontics but no one seems to ever mention becominig a prosthodontist and I am fascinated by the work that I have seen at the cancer hospital I work at. I think this is a more intensive route and maybe not practical given my age (soon to be 27) and my finacial/family goals/future. Anyone have any information on the field? It's difficult to find much on it...such as if they require an MD degree as well (in which case there is no way I would want to spend an additional 6 yrs after dental school training.) If anyone has any info, can you make me informed ;) Thanks!

Prosth isn't as competitive as, say, ortho or OMFS (and, in reference to an earlier post, only about 15-20% of the programs out there have the option of granting an MD en route to the OMFS certification) and it doesn't require a medical degree beyond your DMD/DDS training. Most programs are 2-3 years, and if you really enjoy the field and a good challenge, you can do another 1-2 years and obtain additional training in maxillo-facial prostheses. So in addition to your training in longspan bridges, full dentures, RPD's, etc. you would be able to a range of prosthetic devices for the head and face (such as eyes, entire halves of a person's face, and so on). One of the prosthodontic professors here at Penn took her training all the way to that point and it was fascinating to see some of her cases and the restorative work she did. Probably the reason why you haven't heard as much about prosth is because it, like some of the other specialties or subsets of dentistry, isn't as "flashy" and well known like ortho and oral surgery. As a predent I know how you sometimes feel like you are in an information vacuum but once you are in dental school you'll not only be exposed to a lot more information concerning each one but you'll discover, through your preclinical and clinical work, what piques your interests. Best of luck!
 

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Prosth isn't as competitive as, say, ortho or OMFS (and, in reference to an earlier post, only about 15-20% of the programs out there have the option of granting an MD en route to the OMFS certification) and it doesn't require a medical degree beyond your DMD/DDS training. Most programs are 2-3 years, and if you really enjoy the field and a good challenge, you can do another 1-2 years and obtain additional training in maxillo-facial prostheses. So in addition to your training in longspan bridges, full dentures, RPD's, etc. you would be able to a range of prosthetic devices for the head and face (such as eyes, entire halves of a person's face, and so on). One of the prosthodontic professors here at Penn took her training all the way to that point and it was fascinating to see some of her cases and the restorative work she did. Probably the reason why you haven't heard as much about prosth is because it, like some of the other specialties or subsets of dentistry, isn't as "flashy" and well known like ortho and oral surgery. As a predent I know how you sometimes feel like you are in an information vacuum but once you are in dental school you'll not only be exposed to a lot more information concerning each one but you'll discover, through your preclinical and clinical work, what piques your interests. Best of luck!

Until about 10-15 years ago, pros was divided into fixed or removable prosthodontics such as bridges or dentures. That is why older prosthodontic faculty at dental schools focus in either discipline. Today prosthodontics are all three years in length and most programs offer the Masters degree in addition to the certificate. A maxillofacial prosthodontist plays a vital role in rehabilitation of the patients after having cancer removal. If you like to combine art and science as well as making a big impact on patient's life, consider becoming the maxillofacial prosthodontist. DP
 
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I haven't heard of a Maxillofacial Pros, but it sounds like an amazing specialty!
 

SugarNaCl

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This specialty is REALLY interesting! Thank you everyone for the information! I appreciate it so much.
 

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This specialty is REALLY interesting! Thank you everyone for the information! I appreciate it so much.

Hmm, reading up on it makes it seem fairly interesting indeed. The outlook is pretty good for pros too considering the frequency with which implants are being tossed into people :)
 

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Hmm, reading up on it makes it seem fairly interesting indeed. The outlook is pretty good for pros too considering the frequency with which implants are being tossed into people :)

Pros is NEVER a "dying specialty" or having a poor outlook. Dentistry is 90% restorative unless you are OS, endo or ortho. Being a prosthodontist makes you very marketable because you will have a deep understanding of the restorative procedures and you can do complicated cases without fear. Believe me, after you complete a good residency program, you will have a much deeper understanding about restorative dentistry that no GP can get just by doing CE courses. Ofcourse there are always exceptions but if someone tells me that just by doing more cases and attend CE classes that a GP can be as competent as a prosthodontist is hard for me to buy. DP
 

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Pros is NEVER a "dying specialty" or having a poor outlook. Dentistry is 90% restorative unless you are OS, endo or ortho. Being a prosthodontist makes you very marketable because you will have a deep understanding of the restorative procedures and you can do complicated cases without fear. Believe me, after you complete a good residency program, you will have a much deeper understanding about restorative dentistry that no GP can get just by doing CE courses. Ofcourse there are always exceptions but if someone tells me that just by doing more cases and attend CE classes that a GP can be as competent as a prosthodontist is hard for me to buy. DP

besides arn't they teaching prosth residents to place implants now too (or at least at some programs?)

but ya prosth definitely isn't a dying specialty, there are a lot of people who are happy with dentures
 

Dr. Dai Phan

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besides arn't they teaching prosth residents to place implants now too (or at least at some programs?)

but ya prosth definitely isn't a dying specialty, there are a lot of people who are happy with dentures

Nowadays placing implants are no longer in the hands of the periodontists or oral surgeons but is open to everyone. If you can screw a screw, you can put in an implant. Just know your dental anatomy and you will be fine. I still remember the days where OS draped the patient from head to toes, pulse oximeter, head loupes and acted like they are doing neurosurgery on a single tooth implant. Still makes me chuckle till this day.... DP
 

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MD degree is only for OMFS.

it is probably less competitive than OMFS and Ortho, about as competitive as pedo & endo, and more competitive than perio.

just a guess tho...

Prosth is probably the least competitive specialty of all of them. Endo and pedo are far more competitive.
 

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Prosth is probably the least competitive specialty of all of them. Endo and pedo are far more competitive.

Agree. But why do you think US grads don't find that specialty apealling? Is it the nature of the residency (long hours after work in the lab?), high overhead costs, boring procedures? DP
 

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Agree. But why do you think US grads don't find that specialty apealling? Is it the nature of the residency (long hours after work in the lab?), high overhead costs, boring procedures? DP

After my initial exposure to it and other specialties I think the above play a strong role, not to mention the tedious and technique sensitive nature of many of the procedures (the array of impressions, try-ins, visits, etc.) and the associated skill sets can sometimes turn people off (then again, virtually all of dentistry can fall into this category). For example, many of my classmates break out in a rash if you mention the word 'dentures' or 'multi-unit bridge'. I also think that there is a measure of percieved prestige that is often assigned to specialties - not because one is innately better than the other - which is based in part on income potential, degree of schooling, nature of work, public opinion and awareness, and the like, all of which can heavily influence student's choices.
 

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After my initial exposure to it and other specialties I think the above play a strong role, not to mention the tedious and technique sensitive nature of many of the procedures (the array of impressions, try-ins, visits, etc.) and the associated skill sets can sometimes turn people off (then again, virtually all of dentistry can fall into this category). For example, many of my classmates break out in a rash if you mention the word 'dentures' or 'multi-unit bridge'. I also think that there is a measure of percieved prestige that is often assigned to specialties - not because one is innately better than the other - which is based in part on income potential, degree of schooling, nature of work, public opinion and awareness, and the like, all of which can heavily influence student's choices.


When I was in my first year, I wanted to become a pedodontist. I did my summer research with the Pedo director and was a guru when comes to Pedo points. And I HATED pros!!! I thought the pros. instructors were damn " a-al retentive" and I just cringed everytime I was about to do a pros. procedure. But after an incident of having vomited upon in Pedo rotation, I said to myself that you got to be a Saint to deal with this kind of c___. I also realized that I can do preps in 1/5 of the time it required my classmates to do. So I look into pros and I can tell you that if it is not for this field, I would have changed major long time ago.

I find pros is extremely rewarding when I see the results of my work improve the patient's appearance such as full mouth rehab or delivery of a mid face prosthesis coupled with obturator for patients undergone maxillectomy. It is nice to know that I can do these kinds of services and for some others they can't do it. DP
 

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When I was in my first year, I wanted to become a pedodontist. I did my summer research with the Pedo director and was a guru when comes to Pedo points. And I HATED pros!!! I thought the pros. instructors were damn " a-al retentive" and I just cringed everytime I was about to do a pros. procedure. But after an incident of having vomited upon in Pedo rotation, I said to myself that you got to be a Saint to deal with this kind of c___. I also realized that I can do preps in 1/5 of the time it required my classmates to do. So I look into pros and I can tell you that if it is not for this field, I would have changed major long time ago.

I find pros is extremely rewarding when I see the results of my work improve the patient's appearance such as full mouth rehab or delivery of a mid face prosthesis coupled with obturator for patients undergone maxillectomy. It is nice to know that I can do these kinds of services and for some others they can't do it. DP

lol! oh no. I'm thinking of pedo and that's the only thing I would do if I specialize. I'm a dude, and I like kids (and little cute animals) and people told me i'm good with them. I mean, did you like kids when you stepped into that pedo rotation? or everyone has a breaking point? I think I can deal with the vomit.
 
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