Nov 5, 2020
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Hello! Looking to get some feedback. I am currently in the first semester of a Psych NP program and am having some serious doubts at times about whether I actually want to pursue this track. I do attend a reputable program that is heavier on pathophysiology and the sciences without much nursing fluff but I do still feel that I am shortchanging myself by not pursuing medical school. I have been working as a Psychiatric RN for awhile and realized that I have no interest in any other field except psych so decided to go back to school (NP). I feel that I should stick out my program since I am getting scholarships and financially I am in a great position with little to no debt. I have been researching and frequently read a lot of negative comments about NPs in general which is discouraging, but in person, the Doctors are all usually pretty supportive. As a potential future Psych NP what are some tips to be as competent as possible or what separates a bad NP from a good NP? I have been working very hard to study as much as possible including extra readings etc. and working closely with the Psychiatrists at work to see their patterns and rationale too. Way back in undergrad I was pursuing medical school for a bit but didn't commit for a variety of reasons which I do regret sometimes. One option that feels extremely daunting would be to pursue medical school in the future but not sure retaking prerequisites, 7+ years schooling, and debt would necessarily be worth it at this point in my life. Thanks!
 
Mar 30, 2010
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What you are doing right now is what it takes to be a sharp NP. That’s it.

When you start your first job, you’ll essentially be cut loose to do your own thing. You might have a physician or an experienced NP nearby to bounce questions off of, but to handle the workflow and be remotely productive, you’ll need to have your ducks in a row. Everyone else around you will be in their own offices seeing patients, and you won’t frequently catch them to run a patient by them in the heat of the moment. In most cases, on day 1 you are essentially independent. Given that fact, when choosing between psyche Np and psychiatrist, you should factor in how much money you want to make. If you want a bigger long term haul, then pursue medical school. The price paid for that is lots of time, both in school, as well as in time it takes to pay off your debt after school. At a bare minimum, you’ll be looking at possibly 2 years of school for prereqs (if you are lucky). Those prereqs are a beast, and will disrupt your life as you work and go to school at the same time. That’s why I think it might take even longer than 2 years depending on how much regular life you want to have while you hammer them out. Then you have to figure out how to time your application process so that you don’t have a lot of wasted time while you wait the whole year before medical school starts. Then (unless you go to a 3 year medical school), you have 4 years of medical school, and 3 years of residency.

The expenses include medical school coming in at roughly 50k per year(?.... not sure how much it costs these days). Then living expenses, which with my lifestyle and family would probably cost at least $40,000 per year if we scaled things back a bit. Residency pays better these days, but it’s not the big money that makes a dent in your debt.

Psychiatry can be profitable, to the tune of averaging between $220k-$300k per year, and even more if you build up your own practice, or have some profitable side gigs. You can also hit the ground running at a fast pace and be really productive due to your training, which can bring in bonuses, or else just make it so you can move a lot of revenue through.

As a new NP, I was lucky to land a position paying north of $150k, and I don’t think that is a rarity, even in my low cost of living state. But working in an outpatient role for a large company will probably never pay me more than $180k, ever. I have great benefits, and a good work environment, with plenty of time off. They have very reasonable expectations for my workload. A side gig I have brings in close to $23,000 a year without a lot of time or effort on my part. But I know psychiatrists with side gigs pulling in a lot more than that.

I get the whole “respect” angle that people feel like they would miss out on by foregoing medical school. I guess it depends on how you see that “respect” being manifest. I work seeing patients all day at my job, then I go home. I interact with my provider colleagues, at lunch, meetings, and briefly in passing. I’m treated well, and don’t feel like a second class citizen. On a day to day basis I’m actually more of a money maker because my wages are lower, but reimbursement is similar. Maybe among doctors there is a satisfaction amongst themselves in conversations knowing that they all went through the same hell of medical school, and they can have that exclusive club to themselves while I stay out of those conversations when they come up. Apart from that, a lot of docs have said things that border on envy regarding my pathway to doing what I do. I paid off my school my first year working. I paid off my house the second year. If I go private practice and work for myself and manage to make what my friend does, I should be able to take home over $300k. I won’t do that, but I could. If I hire some NPs and counselors, I could make even more. I do my job and take pride in it. I don’t crave any envy or anything beyond basic respect from any doctors or from the general public. For me, any added glory I’d obtain by being a physician would be a Pyrrhic victory given what I would have to go through to achieve it.

I’m kind of a corporate guy. I like parking in my special parking space and walking into a big building, dealing with large HR, dealing with large IT when I have computer problems. Eating in a large cafeteria every day. Going home and not thinking about anything else until I walk into work the next day. I feel like I get a bit of tempered respect from physicians who at times look at me and feel like they should have gone that route. My guess is that they then look at their cash flow, and it assuages a lot of those pangs of longing. Over the years, I got to spend a lot of time with my family though, and it was quality and quantity. We are lucky enough to live in a place and time when it’s reasonable to achieve a great standard of living. If I made more money, it wouldn’t add much to my standard of living, I’d just have more and nicer things. But I feel like I live better now than a millionaire did 20 years ago. I keep score a different way than a lot of folks.
 
Mar 30, 2010
1,477
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  1. Other Health Professions Student
Oh, and yes, in person, you will never encounter any of the kinds of disparagement about NPs you are witnessing on an anonymous forum. If anyone disses you in private, then that says a lot about them.

I don’t invite invective at work because I don’t puff myself up, or throw criticism out at others, and thus, I have never encountered anything other than respect from those around me. I walk into a room and have a look that doesn’t portray me as not being straightforward, and I follow that up with how I talk to and about people. Physicians that I deal with look at my documentation and my results with their patients and see that their patients are in good hands.

I think people underestimate how much respect you gain by never talking too much smack about folks. Doesn’t mean holding back an opinion, but it means being fair to them. From what I see on forums, there’s a good population of people who talk big, and then in real life they dial it down a ton. If they don’t, then you can imagine how awesome it is to work around them. But the logic that someone can be a prick on a forum and be delightful in-person doesn’t really add up to me either.

While there are docs that try to steer their patients away from the crazy cat lady NP who mixes in weird concoctions along with “wellness” services, or away from the NP that has never worked as a nurse, I know very few docs that would hesitate to send me the lion share of their patients if they knew anything about me. Your goal should be to work toward that kind of reputation if you decide to be an NP. The notion that you automatically get respect these days based on your pedigree is something that leads to a hollow sense of accomplishment. The respect people have for you might start higher at first, but it can easily go up or down from there.
 
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Nov 5, 2020
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Thanks for the reply! Lots of good advice here and really appreciate your time to provide some valuable feedback. I am a pretty motivated and hard worker, so my time right now is best spent learning as much as possible and making sure I am as competent as possible. I think I have pretty similar goals in what you are describing and honestly, money really isn't a big concern for me. I do pretty well working as an RN but had an opportunity to basically go back to school for free. I just want to be good at what I do and provide good care to people. I would prefer to work under a Psychiatrist and I wouldn't think of my self as "less" but just providing some good services from a different angle. As long as I am providing good care, the title of being a mid level doesn't bother me at all since I am not an egotistical or envious person in general. Thanks for the reply! Good luck with everything
 
Aug 27, 2019
164
80
What you are doing right now is what it takes to be a sharp NP. That’s it.

When you start your first job, you’ll essentially be cut loose to do your own thing. You might have a physician or an experienced NP nearby to bounce questions off of, but to handle the workflow and be remotely productive, you’ll need to have your ducks in a row. Everyone else around you will be in their own offices seeing patients, and you won’t frequently catch them to run a patient by them in the heat of the moment. In most cases, on day 1 you are essentially independent. Given that fact, when choosing between psyche Np and psychiatrist, you should factor in how much money you want to make. If you want a bigger long term haul, then pursue medical school. The price paid for that is lots of time, both in school, as well as in time it takes to pay off your debt after school. At a bare minimum, you’ll be looking at possibly 2 years of school for prereqs (if you are lucky). Those prereqs are a beast, and will disrupt your life as you work and go to school at the same time. That’s why I think it might take even longer than 2 years depending on how much regular life you want to have while you hammer them out. Then you have to figure out how to time your application process so that you don’t have a lot of wasted time while you wait the whole year before medical school starts. Then (unless you go to a 3 year medical school), you have 4 years of medical school, and 3 years of residency.

The expenses include medical school coming in at roughly 50k per year(?.... not sure how much it costs these days). Then living expenses, which with my lifestyle and family would probably cost at least $40,000 per year if we scaled things back a bit. Residency pays better these days, but it’s not the big money that makes a dent in your debt.

Psychiatry can be profitable, to the tune of averaging between $220k-$300k per year, and even more if you build up your own practice, or have some profitable side gigs. You can also hit the ground running at a fast pace and be really productive due to your training, which can bring in bonuses, or else just make it so you can move a lot of revenue through.

As a new NP, I was lucky to land a position paying north of $150k, and I don’t think that is a rarity, even in my low cost of living state. But working in an outpatient role for a large company will probably never pay me more than $180k, ever. I have great benefits, and a good work environment, with plenty of time off. They have very reasonable expectations for my workload. A side gig I have brings in close to $23,000 a year without a lot of time or effort on my part. But I know psychiatrists with side gigs pulling in a lot more than that.

I get the whole “respect” angle that people feel like they would miss out on by foregoing medical school. I guess it depends on how you see that “respect” being manifest. I work seeing patients all day at my job, then I go home. I interact with my provider colleagues, at lunch, meetings, and briefly in passing. I’m treated well, and don’t feel like a second class citizen. On a day to day basis I’m actually more of a money maker because my wages are lower, but reimbursement is similar. Maybe among doctors there is a satisfaction amongst themselves in conversations knowing that they all went through the same hell of medical school, and they can have that exclusive club to themselves while I stay out of those conversations when they come up. Apart from that, a lot of docs have said things that border on envy regarding my pathway to doing what I do. I paid off my school my first year working. I paid off my house the second year. If I go private practice and work for myself and manage to make what my friend does, I should be able to take home over $300k. I won’t do that, but I could. If I hire some NPs and counselors, I could make even more. I do my job and take pride in it. I don’t crave any envy or anything beyond basic respect from any doctors or from the general public. For me, any added glory I’d obtain by being a physician would be a Pyrrhic victory given what I would have to go through to achieve it.

I’m kind of a corporate guy. I like parking in my special parking space and walking into a big building, dealing with large HR, dealing with large IT when I have computer problems. Eating in a large cafeteria every day. Going home and not thinking about anything else until I walk into work the next day. I feel like I get a bit of tempered respect from physicians who at times look at me and feel like they should have gone that route. My guess is that they then look at their cash flow, and it assuages a lot of those pangs of longing. Over the years, I got to spend a lot of time with my family though, and it was quality and quantity. We are lucky enough to live in a place and time when it’s reasonable to achieve a great standard of living. If I made more money, it wouldn’t add much to my standard of living, I’d just have more and nicer things. But I feel like I live better now than a millionaire did 20 years ago. I keep score a different way than a lot of folks.
What you are doing right now is what it takes to be a sharp NP. That’s it.

When you start your first job, you’ll essentially be cut loose to do your own thing. You might have a physician or an experienced NP nearby to bounce questions off of, but to handle the workflow and be remotely productive, you’ll need to have your ducks in a row. Everyone else around you will be in their own offices seeing patients, and you won’t frequently catch them to run a patient by them in the heat of the moment. In most cases, on day 1 you are essentially independent. Given that fact, when choosing between psyche Np and psychiatrist, you should factor in how much money you want to make. If you want a bigger long term haul, then pursue medical school. The price paid for that is lots of time, both in school, as well as in time it takes to pay off your debt after school. At a bare minimum, you’ll be looking at possibly 2 years of school for prereqs (if you are lucky). Those prereqs are a beast, and will disrupt your life as you work and go to school at the same time. That’s why I think it might take even longer than 2 years depending on how much regular life you want to have while you hammer them out. Then you have to figure out how to time your application process so that you don’t have a lot of wasted time while you wait the whole year before medical school starts. Then (unless you go to a 3 year medical school), you have 4 years of medical school, and 3 years of residency.

The expenses include medical school coming in at roughly 50k per year(?.... not sure how much it costs these days). Then living expenses, which with my lifestyle and family would probably cost at least $40,000 per year if we scaled things back a bit. Residency pays better these days, but it’s not the big money that makes a dent in your debt.

Psychiatry can be profitable, to the tune of averaging between $220k-$300k per year, and even more if you build up your own practice, or have some profitable side gigs. You can also hit the ground running at a fast pace and be really productive due to your training, which can bring in bonuses, or else just make it so you can move a lot of revenue through.

As a new NP, I was lucky to land a position paying north of $150k, and I don’t think that is a rarity, even in my low cost of living state. But working in an outpatient role for a large company will probably never pay me more than $180k, ever. I have great benefits, and a good work environment, with plenty of time off. They have very reasonable expectations for my workload. A side gig I have brings in close to $23,000 a year without a lot of time or effort on my part. But I know psychiatrists with side gigs pulling in a lot more than that.

I get the whole “respect” angle that people feel like they would miss out on by foregoing medical school. I guess it depends on how you see that “respect” being manifest. I work seeing patients all day at my job, then I go home. I interact with my provider colleagues, at lunch, meetings, and briefly in passing. I’m treated well, and don’t feel like a second class citizen. On a day to day basis I’m actually more of a money maker because my wages are lower, but reimbursement is similar. Maybe among doctors there is a satisfaction amongst themselves in conversations knowing that they all went through the same hell of medical school, and they can have that exclusive club to themselves while I stay out of those conversations when they come up. Apart from that, a lot of docs have said things that border on envy regarding my pathway to doing what I do. I paid off my school my first year working. I paid off my house the second year. If I go private practice and work for myself and manage to make what my friend does, I should be able to take home over $300k. I won’t do that, but I could. If I hire some NPs and counselors, I could make even more. I do my job and take pride in it. I don’t crave any envy or anything beyond basic respect from any doctors or from the general public. For me, any added glory I’d obtain by being a physician would be a Pyrrhic victory given what I would have to go through to achieve it.

I’m kind of a corporate guy. I like parking in my special parking space and walking into a big building, dealing with large HR, dealing with large IT when I have computer problems. Eating in a large cafeteria every day. Going home and not thinking about anything else until I walk into work the next day. I feel like I get a bit of tempered respect from physicians who at times look at me and feel like they should have gone that route. My guess is that they then look at their cash flow, and it assuages a lot of those pangs of longing. Over the years, I got to spend a lot of time with my family though, and it was quality and quantity. We are lucky enough to live in a place and time when it’s reasonable to achieve a great standard of living. If I made more money, it wouldn’t add much to my standard of living, I’d just have more and nicer things. But I feel like I live better now than a millionaire did 20 years ago. I keep score a different way than a lot of folks.
Awesome info here. What would you say a realistic starting salary for Pysch NP’s would be? How about salary 5-10 years out? Is it possible to work a side gig at night or weekends to make extra money? Lastly, do you think this field has a chance to get saturated in the future? Thanks!
 
Mar 30, 2010
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458
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  1. Other Health Professions Student
Awesome info here. What would you say a realistic starting salary for Pysch NP’s would be? How about salary 5-10 years out? Is it possible to work a side gig at night or weekends to make extra money? Lastly, do you think this field has a chance to get saturated in the future? Thanks!

A lot depends on what venue you work in. I consider anything between $130k-$160k to be excellent starting wages as an employee psyche NP. The wage situation is interesting in that there can be a lot of stasis unless you factor in your ability to become more productive over time. The wage I stated at will probably continue to be near my wage in 5 years, but my productivity improves, along with some other adjustments to reimbursement. At least that’s where my current situation stands. I’m content to be an employee because my benefits are fantastic, and I don’t have to worry about anything but seeing patients. I have friends that have their own practices, and they also do very well... above $250, and even higher. It’s pretty much unheard of to learn of those kinds of wages for NPs that are working as employees for someone else. But with the high wages comes high taxes, and the headaches of running a business. Some folks thrive in that environment.

I personally don’t know any NPs in psyche who have told me that their wages are less than $140k. That’s classmates, colleagues, friends, etc. I know of quite a few practices that want to pay much lower than that, but none of those places have been able to find someone willing to work lower than that $140k threshold. I’m sure there are folks out there working for lower wages, I just don’t know any personally. On the flip side, I don’t know many psyche NPs making north of $180k at one job as an employee. But I do personally know several outliers as well who are pulling in $220 and above.

I have a side gig that pays well for what I have to put into it. There is no shortage of work out there to pick up, but what limits you is your time to devote to it. You easily come to the point where you are questioning whether or not your time with work the extra money.
 
Aug 27, 2019
164
80
A lot depends on what venue you work in. I consider anything between $130k-$160k to be excellent starting wages as an employee psyche NP. The wage situation is interesting in that there can be a lot of stasis unless you factor in your ability to become more productive over time. The wage I stated at will probably continue to be near my wage in 5 years, but my productivity improves, along with some other adjustments to reimbursement. At least that’s where my current situation stands. I’m content to be an employee because my benefits are fantastic, and I don’t have to worry about anything but seeing patients. I have friends that have their own practices, and they also do very well... above $250, and even higher. It’s pretty much unheard of to learn of those kinds of wages for NPs that are working as employees for someone else. But with the high wages comes high taxes, and the headaches of running a business. Some folks thrive in that environment.

I personally don’t know any NPs in psyche who have told me that their wages are less than $140k. That’s classmates, colleagues, friends, etc. I know of quite a few practices that want to pay much lower than that, but none of those places have been able to find someone willing to work lower than that $140k threshold. I’m sure there are folks out there working for lower wages, I just don’t know any personally. On the flip side, I don’t know many psyche NPs making north of $180k at one job as an employee. But I do personally know several outliers as well who are pulling in $220 and above.

I have a side gig that pays well for what I have to put into it. There is no shortage of work out there to pick up, but what limits you is your time to devote to it. You easily come to the point where you are questioning whether or not your time with work the extra money.
Thanks so much for your response. Would you say salary is geographically dependent? In addition it seems that pysch np’s make significantly more than other np’s in different fields. Why do you think that is true? Is saturation as bad for psych as it is for FNP?
Thanks!
 
Mar 30, 2010
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  1. Other Health Professions Student
Thanks so much for your response. Would you say salary is geographically dependent? In addition it seems that pysch np’s make significantly more than other np’s in different fields. Why do you think that is true? Is saturation as bad for psych as it is for FNP?
Thanks!
Salary seems to be across the board to some degree, but counterintuitive in certain respects. I have classmates who are making over $180k working in extremely rural locales. Living in a desirable city can lead to a pay cut because of some degree of saturation. The disruption to the industry that I see in the horizon is the impact that telehralth might have on wages, because workers will not be bound by geography, which will likely lead to diluted value. I also see concerning signs of more desperate FNPs practicing in psyche and prescribing psyche meds. Having prior psyche experience as a psyche nurse on a mental health floor helps a lot to understand how to deal with psyche patients, and what drives them in the moment. I’m much more valuable and intuitive because of my work on a high acuity mental health unit prior to getting my psyche NP degree. Folks that worked in primary care and then think they can make the jump to psyche don’t hold a candle to what I bring to the table. Might not make me better at everything, but it’s experience that is almost impossible to match through any other means. However, administration shot callers can often be found appreciating other qualities that are more easily quantifiable.... as in money, and obtaining it in the near term.

Why do psyche NPs tend to make more (and yes, we tend to make a lot more)? We’ve been rare for a long time. The stigma of the mental health field keeps a lot of folks out of it. The difficulty of being truly good at it can chase away people that aren’t cut out for it. There is a huge need for mental health prescribing everywhere, even through the margins aren’t nearly as lucrative as almost anything else. Since it needs to be done, but still remains an afterthought for most healthcare entities, a lot of them are content to simply share the wealth just to have it out of the way and dealt with. Kind of like “sure, take what you want and leave me alone so I can hire a bunch of NPs and Docs to work cardiology where the big money is.” But plenty of folks are making money on psyche, it’s just not a spigot.
 

TikiTorches

MD Attending Physician
Sep 12, 2010
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What you are doing right now is what it takes to be a sharp NP. That’s it.

When you start your first job, you’ll essentially be cut loose to do your own thing. You might have a physician or an experienced NP nearby to bounce questions off of, but to handle the workflow and be remotely productive, you’ll need to have your ducks in a row. Everyone else around you will be in their own offices seeing patients, and you won’t frequently catch them to run a patient by them in the heat of the moment. In most cases, on day 1 you are essentially independent. Given that fact, when choosing between psyche Np and psychiatrist, you should factor in how much money you want to make. If you want a bigger long term haul, then pursue medical school. The price paid for that is lots of time, both in school, as well as in time it takes to pay off your debt after school. At a bare minimum, you’ll be looking at possibly 2 years of school for prereqs (if you are lucky). Those prereqs are a beast, and will disrupt your life as you work and go to school at the same time. That’s why I think it might take even longer than 2 years depending on how much regular life you want to have while you hammer them out. Then you have to figure out how to time your application process so that you don’t have a lot of wasted time while you wait the whole year before medical school starts. Then (unless you go to a 3 year medical school), you have 4 years of medical school, and 3 years of residency.

The expenses include medical school coming in at roughly 50k per year(?.... not sure how much it costs these days). Then living expenses, which with my lifestyle and family would probably cost at least $40,000 per year if we scaled things back a bit. Residency pays better these days, but it’s not the big money that makes a dent in your debt.

Psychiatry can be profitable, to the tune of averaging between $220k-$300k per year, and even more if you build up your own practice, or have some profitable side gigs. You can also hit the ground running at a fast pace and be really productive due to your training, which can bring in bonuses, or else just make it so you can move a lot of revenue through.

As a new NP, I was lucky to land a position paying north of $150k, and I don’t think that is a rarity, even in my low cost of living state. But working in an outpatient role for a large company will probably never pay me more than $180k, ever. I have great benefits, and a good work environment, with plenty of time off. They have very reasonable expectations for my workload. A side gig I have brings in close to $23,000 a year without a lot of time or effort on my part. But I know psychiatrists with side gigs pulling in a lot more than that.

I get the whole “respect” angle that people feel like they would miss out on by foregoing medical school. I guess it depends on how you see that “respect” being manifest. I work seeing patients all day at my job, then I go home. I interact with my provider colleagues, at lunch, meetings, and briefly in passing. I’m treated well, and don’t feel like a second class citizen. On a day to day basis I’m actually more of a money maker because my wages are lower, but reimbursement is similar. Maybe among doctors there is a satisfaction amongst themselves in conversations knowing that they all went through the same hell of medical school, and they can have that exclusive club to themselves while I stay out of those conversations when they come up. Apart from that, a lot of docs have said things that border on envy regarding my pathway to doing what I do. I paid off my school my first year working. I paid off my house the second year. If I go private practice and work for myself and manage to make what my friend does, I should be able to take home over $300k. I won’t do that, but I could. If I hire some NPs and counselors, I could make even more. I do my job and take pride in it. I don’t crave any envy or anything beyond basic respect from any doctors or from the general public. For me, any added glory I’d obtain by being a physician would be a Pyrrhic victory given what I would have to go through to achieve it.

I’m kind of a corporate guy. I like parking in my special parking space and walking into a big building, dealing with large HR, dealing with large IT when I have computer problems. Eating in a large cafeteria every day. Going home and not thinking about anything else until I walk into work the next day. I feel like I get a bit of tempered respect from physicians who at times look at me and feel like they should have gone that route. My guess is that they then look at their cash flow, and it assuages a lot of those pangs of longing. Over the years, I got to spend a lot of time with my family though, and it was quality and quantity. We are lucky enough to live in a place and time when it’s reasonable to achieve a great standard of living. If I made more money, it wouldn’t add much to my standard of living, I’d just have more and nicer things. But I feel like I live better now than a millionaire did 20 years ago. I keep score a different way than a lot of folks.
There's no 3 year med school i know of. And residency for psychiatry is 4 years long.
 
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There's no 3 year med school i know of. And residency for psychiatry is 4 years long.


I could go on with many more links regarding the growing trend of 3 year programs, but I also think I did a good enough job clarifying that 3 year med schools were probably not the norm, but a possibility. Hence I said “then, unless you go to a 3 year medical school....”. But yeah... you are wrong I guess.

But you are right that psyche residencies are indeed 4 years these days. Unless one wants to practice psychiatry with something like a primary care residency. So that’s possible.

squeakyporches.... sigh.
 
Jun 23, 2019
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Thanks so much for your response. Would you say salary is geographically dependent? In addition it seems that pysch np’s make significantly more than other np’s in different fields. Why do you think that is true? Is saturation as bad for psych as it is for FNP?
In generally it does depend on geographical location. PMHNPs in the southeastern states get offers in the $90-110k's while those in Bay area typically get near $200k. Psych is a specialty that's historically undesirable, leading to low number of practitioners. That is changing rapidly as everyone knows about the compensation. It's not just RNs, but anyone with a remote association with psych are going into psych NP (e.g. counselors, therapists, social workers, psych majors, and other random folks). Online nursing forums are flooded with PMHNP inquiries.

Thus, I do think psych NP job market will saturate in 5-10 years. Uncertain as to how saturate it will be or whether telepsych will alleviate some of that (more even workforce distribution). Also to keep in mind, psych NPs can practice in ~23 states without physician supervision, which means your livelihood theoretically is not tied to job openings. You can build your own patient panel with some hard work.
 
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TikiTorches

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Sep 12, 2010
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What


I could go on with many more links regarding the growing trend of 3 year programs, but I also think I did a good enough job clarifying that 3 year med schools were probably not the norm, but a possibility. Hence I said “then, unless you go to a 3 year medical school....”. But yeah... you are wrong I guess.

But you are right that psyche residencies are indeed 4 years these days. Unless one wants to practice psychiatry with something like a primary care residency. So that’s possible.

squeakyporches.... sigh.
Looks like the three year program are more for people going into primary care
 
Mar 30, 2010
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  1. Other Health Professions Student
Looks like the three year program are more for people going into primary care

Nope.... you just don’t know at all what you are talking about. In fact, before I brought it to your attention, you didn’t even know such a creature as a 3-year U.S. medical school existed on our good green Earth. You produced your own appeal to authority fallacy by weaponizing expert opinion (conveniently
provided by you) as fact, and it blew up in your face.


Let’s revisit what you said:
There's no 3 year med school i know of.
But you didn’t close the door entirely I guess. You said that no medical school “that you know of” offers a 3 year program. Ok. Whatever. So now you know that they exist. Thanks for your expertise.
 

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