Jun 5, 2009
29
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Just had a thought. Are PTs used in collegiate and professional athletics? I know they're their for rehab and post practice treatments, but I'm thinking in terms of being at the actual meets, games, etc. I was just wondering, because I was watching a beach volleyball match where one of the players wore kineseotape (although i know many athletic trainers can tape also), so I'm sure someone must have put that on the player prior to the match.So have PT's gone to help out in the olympics, etc, or do they just send MD's to that?
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
The short answer is defintiely yes!

If you even look at the Olympic website, you will find that PTs are able to volunteer their time with olympic teams. I know many PTs whom have served as medical staff at the olympics and other events. (John Kavanaugh from HSS in NYC works with the US swim team and was in Beijing with them. Todd Elenbecker works for the USTA as well as for Physiotherapy associates). The list goes on and on.

I even get to work with the US Ski and Snowboard Teams and get to travel with them.

Most PTs serve as consultants to major sports teams, but there are PTs that work specifically for teams. Overall it helps to be a PT with an ATC degree but not necessary if you have the right training and knowledge.
 
OP
P
Jun 5, 2009
29
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
that's definitely great to know... it's something i think i'm really interested in and am definitely going to look into it. i was also looking into getting an ATC, but don't really know when I'd be able to get that. I already got my bachelors degree so I guess my only option would be a masters in athletic trainer... but I also hear that there are other organizations that offer athletic training certificates without the degree.. has anyone heard of any in particular, but are they credible?
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
There are Masters in AT, however, you can't practice as an athletic trainer unless you put in the hours on the field and pass the NATABOC, which isn't provided in many of the masters programs designed for those already working as full time professionals in another field (eg. PT). I've thought about doing a master's in AT but each program has told me that I would have to do the hours to be able to sit for the NATABOC (which makes sense). Thus, the only way to practice is going a bachelors or masters route that provides the on-field hours (which is very tough to do while working as a PT). They used to have an internship route but phased that out a few years ago.

There are some PT schools that have a dual degree in ATC/PT so you may want to look into those. For the most part, most PTs won't go back to get ATC after receiving their MSPT/DPT. May as well work towards a SCS (sports clinical specialist).
 

atstudent

Certified Athletic Traine
7+ Year Member
Jun 3, 2009
243
16
Waterloo, IL
mnhopper1s.wordpress.com
Status
Non-Student
There are some PT schools that have a dual degree in ATC/PT so you may want to look into those. For the most part, most PTs won't go back to get ATC after receiving their MSPT/DPT. May as well work towards a SCS (sports clinical specialist).
As a SCS, you still cannot function as an athletic trainer would dealing with the treatment of acute injury and emergency situations.

I know there are some professional organizations and some bigger universities who employ PT's to do their daily rehab.
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
As a SCS, you still cannot function as an athletic trainer would dealing with the treatment of acute injury and emergency situations.

I know there are some professional organizations and some bigger universities who employ PT's to do their daily rehab.
Of course! That's mainly the scope of the ATC. Most PTs don't want that responsibility. Point of my statement was that most practicing PTs would rather progress to the SCS (and make more money) than to go back and spend more money for more schooling as an ATC.

Like you said and I have pointed out, there are many professional orgs that will have either a PT or ATC on staff. And if that person is a PT (without and ATC), he/she better know their acute, on field assessments!
 

MJHUSKERS

10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2009
163
1
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
How about PT's with strength and conditioning or human performance backgrounds? I'm planning on taking the CSCS before PT school and hopefully do a internship with S&C coach like Mike Boyle or Eric Cressey to get some experience.

I think you will see a lot human performance places begin to hire more and more PT's. Check out athlete's performance in Temple, AZ. They train all kinds of pros there and the have a whole team of PTs...obviously their job is different than the S&C coaches.
 
OP
P
Jun 5, 2009
29
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
i'm kind of confused... do you have to be an ATC to become a certified SCS? i was looking at the apta website:

http://www.apta.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Certification2&Template=/TaggedPage/TaggedPageDisplay.cfm&TPLID=206&ContentID=60265

under the neuro, othro, peds and sports download and it said that one of the requirements was an ATC. or am I just looking at somethign totally different. If so, can someone send me the info on the SCS. As for the CSCS cert. what are the requirements to take the test. Is there a course necessary for that?

I've heard that attaining your emt certification is also highly recommended if planning on going into that direction since emergency care may be necessary when on the field/events etc. CSCS
 

MJHUSKERS

10+ Year Member
Apr 12, 2009
163
1
Status
Pre-Rehab Sci [General]
To get your CSCS, all you have to do currently is pass the test. I have completed a couple of courses on the subject matter; a lot of programming classes.

Soon NSCA will require much more to get the CSCS. I've heard they will require an exercise science degree and full time internship with a strength coach. So it's best to get the CSCS now.
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
No you don't have to be an ATC to become an SCS. You do, however, need to be certified in one of 3 things to take the board exam (for SCS only). 1) ATC 2) Emergency Responder 3) EMT/Paramedic. Most PTs will take the Emergency Responder courses offered by the SPTS. Also, you need to have 2000 hours of sports PT or on-field coverage. Best way to do this is through a residency (which are limited and very selective), but by no means do you have to go through a residency.

I too have heard they are going to make the CSCS a little more tough to take. Basically, all you need is a college degree to take it but they recommend any exercise science. I have thought about taking the CSCS as I rehab a lot of high level athletes, but just haven't taken the time to study for it.
 

_FNG_

PT, DPT, OCS
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 15, 2006
133
0
Status
DPT / OTD
No you don't have to be an ATC to become an SCS. You do, however, need to be certified in one of 3 things to take the board exam (for SCS only). 1) ATC 2) Emergency Responder 3) EMT/Paramedic. Most PTs will take the Emergency Responder courses offered by the SPTS. Also, you need to have 2000 hours of sports PT or on-field coverage. Best way to do this is through a residency (which are limited and very selective), but by no means do you have to go through a residency.

I too have heard they are going to make the CSCS a little more tough to take. Basically, all you need is a college degree to take it but they recommend any exercise science. I have thought about taking the CSCS as I rehab a lot of high level athletes, but just haven't taken the time to study for it.
Did you get into your Sports Residency? Howard Head?
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
Actually, I did. I was so stoked about it. Unfortunately, a couple days after I accepted, something happened (no fault of mine nor the residency) and I had to take it back. I was so devastated (was so looking forward to covering the X-games this year!) Oh well, I have a feeling I will have good chances to get into a residency the next time around....Only problem is going from a decent salary to a resident salary...which is why I recommend doing it right outta PT school.
 
OP
P
Jun 5, 2009
29
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
do you mean a sports residency through pt school clinicals, or something entirely different.
 

_FNG_

PT, DPT, OCS
10+ Year Member
7+ Year Member
Dec 15, 2006
133
0
Status
DPT / OTD
Only problem is going from a decent salary to a resident salary...which is why I recommend doing it right outta PT school.
This is something that is quite variable. I've looked at residency programs that go as low as 25k/year to 45k/year which is quite a range especially since billable time was fairly consistent. Any idea on how many applicants applied? Any tips for someone in the process?

/thread hijack
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
do you mean a sports residency through pt school clinicals, or something entirely different.
Nope, residency occurs after PT school. It is a focused route of practice that prepares you for board certification in certain areas (sports, ortho, neuro, peds, etc). Has nothing to do with PT school as you have to be a licensed PT.
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
This is something that is quite variable. I've looked at residency programs that go as low as 25k/year to 45k/year which is quite a range especially since billable time was fairly consistent. Any idea on how many applicants applied? Any tips for someone in the process?

/thread hijack
LOL about hijacking the thread. Sorry to the OP. Ya, the salary is quite variable. Which residencies are you looking into? Feel free to message me if you need to.
 

truthseeker

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
Sep 2, 2004
1,001
311
Status
Clarification:

CSCS= Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist - this is a separate designnation that does not require one to be a PT or an ATC. It is a credential that has good credibility among strength coaches and personal trainers. It indicates some actual knowledge of exerciseo physiology. This does NOT include managing on field injury, rehab etc . . . it is more like straight up performance enhancement and injury prevention.

SCS = Sports clinical Specialist - this is a credential offered by the APTA for physical therapists. MinnDasota indicated the qualifications needed to become a SCS. First, you must be a physical therapist, then you must have one of the three things listed.

I think that things were getting confused between the two since their letters are nearly identical. Although the training overlaps some between the two credentials, they are very, very different scopes of practice.
 
OP
P
Jun 5, 2009
29
0
Status
Rehab Sci Student
Clarification:

CSCS= Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist - this is a separate designnation that does not require one to be a PT or an ATC. It is a credential that has good credibility among strength coaches and personal trainers. It indicates some actual knowledge of exerciseo physiology. This does NOT include managing on field injury, rehab etc . . . it is more like straight up performance enhancement and injury prevention.

SCS = Sports clinical Specialist - this is a credential offered by the APTA for physical therapists. MinnDasota indicated the qualifications needed to become a SCS. First, you must be a physical therapist, then you must have one of the three things listed.

I think that things were getting confused between the two since their letters are nearly identical. Although the training overlaps some between the two credentials, they are very, very different scopes of practice.


thanks for clarifying that. so ill probably get my cscs after taking my exercise physio class just to get some review... but in terms of getting the SCS, what is the usual timeline to get that. in terms of graduating from PT school.. since i'm just starting, i want to make sure i do everything at the right time and not delay or start attaining it too early. I was thinking about going through getting the emergency responder route, but I'm not too sure at which point I will get it. I'm really interested in working for some university sports programs int he future and maybe eventually hopefuly for the olympics, but want to make sure I get everythign I can possibly attain to do so.
 

MinnDasota

10+ Year Member
Apr 10, 2008
446
0
NYC
Status
DPT / OTD
Good idea, get your cscs now, especially before they change any of the requirements. You sound like a carbon copy of me when I was in PT school!! :)

As for the SCS, you will need the 2000 hours of "sport-specific" practice by the time you register for the exam. So it may take you at the least 1 year after PT school working full time in sports rehab before you are eligible to take the board exam. The test is only given once a year (I think in Feb/March) and you have to had registered by the end of July the previous year.

Once you're registered, you have as much as 7 months to study (July to Feb). However, there are no specific books to study like with the PT boards or the GRE. That's why the clinical experience is so important.

The sports residency is the other route in which the requirements have been brought up in previous posts. Some residencies start in the fall while others start in January. They can last anywhere between 12 to 18 months from what I've seen. Some programs also require you to work for them for a year following the residency (eg. Pitt). In the end, you get sports-specific rehab training and are eligible for the boards after finishing. It's a great way to get mentored in the sports field as opposed to learning via continuing ed, reading books, and trial & error. Pay is much less as a resident but you should be able to defer your loans for a year. I know a few people who have gone through sports residencies and each one said it was well worth the experience.

As for the Olympics, I believe you need to be practicing for 5 years before you can go through their "volunteer" route. Check out this website:

http://teamusa.org/content/index/3623

It is not the only way to volunteer (of course if you know the right people or have the right training, there are ways to streamline through this process).

Hope that helps to plan your career timeline!