Mar 8, 2010
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So, I have just recently thought about possibly changing my major from Biology with an emphasis in Cell and Molecular. I'm not exactly sure what I would want to change too, maybe psych/soc. But, after talking to my advisers from this point I would have to lessen the science based courses and focus on just the pre reqs and then the courses to fulfill my bachelors.

So my point being, did the upper level courses microbiology, physiology, anatomy, and such really help and make a difference on the MCAT's? A couple of friends I have talked to said yes and the other no, so I was wondering what everyone here thinks about it? I'm not totally set on changing majors, but its more of a what if factor, and what I would do if I change my mind or don't get in.
 

armybound

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no, the upper levels aren't that useful for the MCAT. they don't require them for the MCAT because outside knowledge of the material is not tested on the MCAT.

if there is material on the MCAT related to those topics, it will be a new synthesis or comprehension type of question that won't require prior familiarity with the material.
 

Appless

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it made very little difference to me. The only way it even helped was that when iwas taking these advanced courses, they forced me to recall the basics used on the mcat. Thats about it. I guess human physio/cell bio helped me a bit but even then not a whole lot.
 

AH3

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it made very little difference to me. The only way it even helped was that when iwas taking these advanced courses, they forced me to recall the basics used on the mcat. Thats about it. I guess human physio/cell bio helped me a bit but even then not a whole lot.
This is right. And my physiology course helped a decent amount. Also, at my undergrad the lower level science courses are pretty weak, so I could get by with much less. Upper level courses in Biology forced me to understand the material and "put it all together". That type of thinking and basic knowledge background helped me on the MCAT.

Another thing to consider- that major will probably best prepare you for medical school. While any major is okay for getting in, I would guess that someone who's had physiology, biochemistry, anatomy, microbiology, etc. would have a better background for their medical classes. As opposed to someone who simply takes the required prereqs and majors in something unrelated to medicine.

There is value in other majors though, so I don't think you can really go wrong. Go with what you enjoy- you will learn what you need to learn in medical school. Another thing- you can always take electives. So you could major in Biology and take Psych/Socio courses or vice versa.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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This is right. And my physiology course helped a decent amount. Also, at my undergrad the lower level science courses are pretty weak, so I could get by with much less. Upper level courses in Biology forced me to understand the material and "put it all together". That type of thinking and basic knowledge background helped me on the MCAT.

Another thing to consider- that major will probably best prepare you for medical school. While any major is okay for getting in, I would guess that someone who's had physiology, biochemistry, anatomy, microbiology, etc. would have a better background for their medical classes. As opposed to someone who simply takes the required prereqs and majors in something unrelated to medicine.

There is value in other majors though, so I don't think you can really go wrong. Go with what you enjoy- you will learn what you need to learn in medical school. Another thing- you can always take electives. So you could major in Biology and take Psych/Socio courses or vice versa.
No major will prepare you for medical school. It'll say that a bio major takes maybe 3 classes that'll actually help you in medical school. That advantage will last for about 2-3 weeks, before your as mind blown as everyone else. My friend for example took cell biology and molecular genetics, and the medical versions went so far beyond all of that. So it barely helped him.
Take a major on the bases that you'll be getting a good gpa in it and will enjoy it as well as seeing it as a back up in case medical school fails. Not to attempt to be ready for medical school. Hell, some people on SDN have had medical school professors and deans tell them to avoid taking upper level classes because they'll learn it the wrong way.
 

osumc2014

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only switch majors if the new major really interests you, otherwise there is no point. Like an above poster said, some of the topics you learn in upper level classes do pop up on a passage, but think about how many upper level classes you would have to take to cover all the topics? IMO, not worth it, I took all the upper level classes and what, one passage was on mol gen when i took it.